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Deciding between 3 Sujihikis--Konosuke, Hattori, Moritaka

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

 

After reading reviews and recommendations on this site and others over the past couple of months, I've narrowed down my choices for a Sujihiki to Konosuke, Hattori, and Moritaka.  If there's something similar I overlooked, please let me know.

 

 

I currently have a set of Mac's which I enjoy greatly. They sharpen easily, are lightweight, and fit great in my hand. I'd like to get something which can take the edge of a Mac but to another level, and stay sharper longer. I've been intrigued by the Moritaka for its high HRC of 63, and 50/50 angle. 

 

These knives are not available in stores so I don't have the chance to try them out and get an idea for their F&F, weight distribution, and handle.

 

 

What do you guys think?

post #2 of 8
Thread Starter 

Has anybody tried at least two of these knives to compare?

post #3 of 8

I can't say much about the Konosukes except to say they have a stellar reputation.  I've had several each of the Moritakas and Hattoris.  The Hattori knives have really terrific fit and finish, both the HD and the FH/KF.  The steel Hattori uses is a pretty pedestrian VG-10 (albeit with a great HT).  Personally I won't pay Hattori pricing for vanilla VG-10 anymore.  It's not bad by any means but it's been surpassed IMO.  VG-10 is somewhat difficult to sharpen (takes a long time to develop a burr, then longer to de-burr). The ultimate sharpness is mediocre, and edge retention won't blow you away.  Still, if you're coming from a German knife you'll probably be very impressed.

 

Moritaka knives (at least the Supreme line that you generally see) uses Aogami Super for the hagane, a far, far superior steel to VG-10 performance wise.  The Moritaka will sharpen more easily, get sharper and stay sharp longer.  It will also patina easily and develop red rust if you leave it wet.  While I don't want to overstate it, I do have to say that it's not at all uncommon to find quirks or minor flaws with the grind of a Moritaka.  They sometimes require a little TLC to get 'em ship shape.  A Hattori will be perfect out of the box. 

 

You may want to check into the Kagayaki CarboNext from JCK, too.  I have a 300mm CarboNext suji and couldn't be happier.  The edge wasn't great out of the box but it will take a fantastic edge with a bit of work.  It gets within a whisker of as sharp as any carbon I've seen (White #1, White #2, Aogami or Blue #2).  Edge retention is very, very good and it's not difficult to sharpen.  It's not full stainless but it doesn't rust easily.  It's semi-stainless tool steel that will take an attractive patina with time.

 

I hope someone with some hands on experience with the Konosuke will come along.  I've never heard a single bad word about them.

 

If I wanted a fairly low-maintenance knife for line use I'd go with the CarboNext.  If I wanted a razor and was okay with babying it a bit I'd opt for the Moritaka.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #4 of 8

What Phaedrus said is gospel.  Let me add the best wa suji I've used is a 300mm Konosuke HD, and the best yo suji was a 270mm Masamoto Sweden.  The Konosuke shirogami is as good as the HD; but is, of course, carbon.

 

  • Are "monosteel" carbon knives a possibility? 
  • Wa or yo handles? 
  • Price range?
  • Current sharpening kit and skill level?
  • Do you use a suji much? 

 

BDL

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post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

The recommendations on the Konosuke keep making it look like the better and better choice...

 

Also, I noticed a spelling error on my behalf. I did not mean Hattori, but rather Hiromoto--which I've heard great things about, specifically the Hiromoto AS super slicer, which is possibly discontinued??? From what I hear it sharpens easily and holds the edge for a long time. That being said, thank you for the detailed info on the Hattori as I had read about them as well. I'll take it out of the running for sure, even though it was on the periphery. 

 

Wa or yo handle is ok either way.

Price is not really an issue for these knife brands. Of course there are $1000 knives out there, but I'm not an Iron Chef. Let's say $400 or less. 

The sujihiki would probably replace my yanagi if I like it enough. I'd sell the yanagi. I'd use the knife for proteins (raw and cooked). 

Sharpening kit is a 1000/6000 mizuyama combo stone and a stone fixer. I'm not an expert sharpener but I'm able to get a burr, deburr, etc. I have no problem getting a coarse or high finishing stone at affordable prices to keep the knife going. 

 

I'm not sure what monostell is....

post #6 of 8

The Hiromoto is also a superb knife.  The hagane (the core that actually cuts) is Super Aogami that's clad with stainless.  This gives you the best of both worlds, in a sense- only the edge is exposed so it resists corrosion.  Of course, being clad it's a tad thicker than some.  And some people claim that clad knives are "dead" feeling.  I respect that some knowledgeable guys (such as BDL) feel that way but it doesn't bother me at all.  Fit and finish is pretty good overall on the Hiromotos.  I eventually sold mine but it was just because I had an itch that I couldn't afford to scratch without selling a few knives off.wink.gif

 

"Monosteel" just means one steel.  Many knives, such as the Shun lines, are laminated.  They use a hagane (core) steel and clad it with a softer steel.  This increases durability and flexibility and makes the knife cheaper to make.  Mono-steel knives are made out of just one steel.  The CarboNext (as well as the Ichimonji TKC) are mono-steel knives.

 

A yanagi and a suji really serve different roles, so I'm not sure you'd replace on with the other.  But the suji is great for carving, slicing, meat cutting and general line use.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the feedback once again.

 

I purchased the yanagi thinking I could use it for more purposes, but quickly realized it was solely made for sashimi. At the time I was doing sashimi style cuts at the restaurant, but I've come to realize a nice sharp sujihiki can pretty much do the same if your technique is decent, plus also do meat. Therefore, the reasoning behind going after a sujihiki.

 

 

Are these knives sold in stores anywhere, or are they solely online orders only?

post #8 of 8

The CarboNext is exclusive to JCK (link:  http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/KAGAYAKICarboNextSeries.html ).  In my neck of the woods I have to order everything.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
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