or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Marinated Roasted Red Peppers, What Did I Do Wrong?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Marinated Roasted Red Peppers, What Did I Do Wrong?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

This is the recipe that I found and followed.

  • 4 pounds firm, fresh, clean red bell peppers
  • 1 cup lemon juice (bottled is recommended)
  • 2 cups white vinegar (5%)
  • 1 cup olive oil + additional for roasting the peppers
  • 2 cloves garlic, quartered
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 3 pint canning jars

 

 

 

I followed the canning process, 15 minute boiling water bath…

And this is what I got as an end result.

 

So here we are a month later, I cracked one of those puppies open and made up an antipasti plate for our snack this evening.

It’s a no go on the Peppers, AGAIN!

I tried to do this last summer, with no success.

What I’m trying to achieve is the peppers that DH's

Italian-from-Italy-Grandmother would ‘put up’ and then line her basement wall with jars full of the ruby-colored goodness.  I have no MIL or any in-law to help me out with a how-to or recipe, nothing!

DH says that you NEVER use vinegar, WHAT? 

How am I suppose to can them and have them sit in the cabinet to ‘marinate’ if there’s no acid.  He tells me that it’s suppose to be just the Pepper, Olive Oil, Garlic and just a small pinch of Red Pepper for heat.

How is that NOT going to create a perfect environment for little nasties to grew in the jars?

Now I have 5 jars (I threw out the one I just opened) of Peppers that are 'sour' and he will not eat them.  I am not a fan, I made them for him!

HELP!!!

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 15

really with that recipe, it'd be the garlic you'd worry about nasty little creatures...

 

but i see no details on what exactly went wrong. hard to say what's wrong with the recipe without that piece of information.

post #3 of 15

so i searched you and read some of your old posts, assuming you are talking about the italian sweet peppers you tried before...

 

couple observations i see here, you've got a lot of vinegar, a LOT of lemon juice, and no sugar.  When I'm putting something in a jar i dont think of it as marinade, i think of it as "brine"  The recipe you have sounds good for maybe a 1 or 2 day marinade in the refrigerator. what i think you want for your canning would be a brine.  so the absence of sugar, the very small amount of salt, and and no spices that would compliment a "sweet" flavor make me say you should go back to the drawing board on that recipe.  even for 3 jars that sounds like way too much lemon juice for me. also the sweet peppers im used to eating are still crunchy. maybe roasting them isnt the way to go?

post #4 of 15

I think to much total acid. I would knock out the lemon juice. Acid will tend to soften and break pepper down a little much.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #5 of 15

Marinating red peppers is very common in the Mediterranean.

 

If you have vinegar, one does not need lemon juice, too acidic and I would reduce the amount of vinegar too.

 

Furthermore, I use a very light Evoo, 100% Hojiblanca Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Additionally, the sugar is missing.

 

 

I would like to mention Evoo or Olive Oil should be light Evoo and preferably Italian, Spanish or Greek.

 

Kaneo, why don´t you try utlising a different classic Mediterranean recipe ?


Edited by margcata - 8/25/12 at 6:10am
post #6 of 15

Just my 2 cents...

 

- most traditional mediterranean recipes are very simple (DH is right), they contain only olive oil ,sometimes some herbs (ex. oregano), and no acid whatsoever (no lemon, no vinegar). At least, that's how I always ate them. Commercial versions usually do contain some acid additive though (citric acid I think?), for safety reasons, butnot to the point of tasting "acid".

. one should sterilise carefully the cans, the best way being pressure sterilisation (it is my understanding that pressure sterilisation can address satisfactorily the botulism issue?) - but some people know much better than me in this area

- sugar is not necessary IMO

- If you want to use acid, other posters are right, the recipe calls for too much lemon / vinegar

post #7 of 15

Colombochute,

 

Very perceptive, and thanks for the informative data.

 

I have a tiny jar of Roasted Red Peppers. in my hand at this very moment while typing this note, I am in Italia; here are the ingredients:

 

red peppers

salt

garlic

sugar

Evoo

citric acid

 

So we are both correct;  no vinegar and no lemon, however, a very very very tiny amount of sugar ... and salt ... and citric acid.

 

Margaux.

post #8 of 15

Marg..Citric acid in your jar of peppers is a preservative. Since it is last ingredient listed it is least of anything added. Ed

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 

I probably should have been a bit more informative.

DH says that the "Italian Red Peppers" that his Nonna would 'put up' in her basement had no vinegar!

So yes, this recipe is out the door.

What I'm trying to achieve, I think, is not possible here in the middle of the desert.  I tossed and turn all night long about this.

Grandmother's basement back in Philly, which I do not have, was quite cool and she was able to keep her peppers for eggs&sausage sandwiches and Antipasti plates, without 'canning' or refrigeration.

I'm thinking:

She charred the peppers

Added Garlic and maybe a pinch of Salt and Red Pepper flakes

Peeled and jarred them

pour hot EVOO over them to cover

Sealed them

Waited for that "pop"

and then stashed then downstairs

?????????????????????

post #10 of 15

Did you covered the roasted peppers completely with the oil?

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #11 of 15

Chef Ed,

 

Yes, citric acid is a preservative. Thanks.

Margi.

post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Soooooo...
What I'm looking for, if it's possible, is some sort of guidance in making roasted red bell peppers using only extra virgin olive oil, garlic and a pinch of red pepper flake. Once I char the peppers, skin them and place them in the jars along with the raw, peeled garlic cloves, should I heat the EVOO ( no I, never use any "light" olive oil, we do not care for the taste of the chemicals) ? Do I add maybe a drop or two of lemon? Can I 'can' these peppers this way in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes for shelf life or just through them in the 'fridge? I don't want to poison DH!!!!!
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 

Okay...

So I went back to the green grocer, who fortunately still

had Sweet Red Bell Peppers on sale 3 for $1.00

I got 2 dozen and went to work.

It has taken me 5 hours to blister the peppers

remove the skin, ribs and seeds

jar them with raw garlic cloves and a pinch of sea salt

topped each of the six jars with hot evoo

heated (oh, and sterilized the jars too) the lids

to soften the seals

and I just heard two 'POP' from the kitchen

I'm just going to toss them into the 'fridge (when they're cooled)

where I have cleared a shelf in the door just

for DH's peppers.

In about 2 weeks I'll make him that beloved

Peppers/Eggs/Hot Italian Sausage sandwich on a hard roll

post #14 of 15

My mother in law used to make all sorts of things in jars with olive oil.  Some had vinegar, some didn't.  The ones that most freaked me out were sausages - hung to dry and then put simply into jars and covered with olive oil.  No sterilizing.  The quantities of oil were amazing.  Sausages are fatty and then the oil.  Well, anyway, not my taste.  But they ate them for generations. 

 

There were carrots which were first blanched in water with some vinegar and then packed in oil with garlic, origano.  No sterilization.  Tasty but i refused to eat them after a couple of days. 

 

There were artichokes.  Heaven forfend that i put even an opened jar in the fridge - she would freak out.  They had to be at room temperature.  I don;t remember peppers but she probably did those as well.  None were put in a water bath, none for certain were pressurized. 

 

My son's girlfriend's mother is in Puglia and she makes the most wonderful paper-thin eggplants, packed in jars with garlic.  The eggplant have a little vinegar in them but barely.  Again, "don't put them in the fridge!!!"  The jar she brought them in was a wide jar made and sold for this purpose with a plastic screw on lid (like you'd get on a jar of instant coffee). Obviously no water bath, seal or anything.  The oil is supposed to preserve them.  Tastier than you can imagine.

 

Why isn't everyone dead of botulism?  I don't know.  I imagine botulism is a rare occurence (though when it hits, watch out!).  Thirty years ago i was at the house of my friend whose husband was a doctor.  He had a can of peaches that was swollen.  He was going to eat them.  I started freaking out and said don't eat those, there's a risk of botulism!  He looked at me like i was crazy. I finally convinced him to look in his medical books, and lo and behold, there it was "botulismo" - he was flabbergasted, didn;t remember ever hearing of it!!!!!  a doctor!!!!   

 

So probably your husband's nonna's peppers were without any vinegar. 

 

all i can say is "Boh?! " (the verbal italian equivalent of a shrug.)

Bear in mind that Italian women are the longest living people on earth!  so i read. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thank sooooo much Siduri, I was hoping that you would post on this thread.  Botulism is a huge concern for me and without the acid and/or water bath 'canning' process ...

Here in the middle of the desert, I don't know if it's cool enough to keep the jars in the cupboard, so if I stash the beauties the 'fridge, what will happen to them?  Does it change the flavor profile?  

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Marinated Roasted Red Peppers, What Did I Do Wrong?