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Apprentice/Commis Chef

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I just realised I probably posted in the wrong section, could someone remove my thread from the culinary school section, please?

 

Hi guys.

 

I'm not exactly in a culinary school but I am training to be a professional chef whilst doing a level 2 apprenticeship in professional cookery. I currently work 5 days a week in a busy restaurant as a commis and do a day release each week to college to learn more.

 

Ive been doing my apprenticeship now for around 5 months and I recently invested in some half decent knives. I bought myself a Global Cooks and Prep knife. A Victorinox Pastry, tomato, chef and prep knife. Im after some advice on sharpening. Ive heard a few things mentioned especially about sharpening Global knives but the stones seem so expensive. Is it worth buying a global branded stone or will any whetstone do? Also what's best for sharpening Victorinox?

 

Finally, any tips from professional chefs for me whilst I study to become a chef? Books to buy? Essential recipes to know?

 

Many thanks, Danny.

post #2 of 6

where are you working and going to school???

I have always provided stones in a every kitchen I've run knowing as a line cook you can not afford the investment.

Honestly if you do not know how to properly use a stone a 2 step would be your best tool for "sharpening" your knives. Incorrectly using a stone will ruin your knives.

Recipe?? What's that??? HA! You just need to cook and practice any time you can, this will help you develop necessary knowledge of smells and flavors that you need to be a good cook or chef.

post #3 of 6

Any good stone will suffice. Just do me a favor, somehow mark all your tools so you can identify them as yours. And good luck on your apprenticeship. In my humble opinion better then any school. Instead of buying books, go to library take 1 or 2 out when you find one you really like then buy it.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys.

I'm working in Derbyshire. I feel my apprenticeship is better than school too, I'm getting all th experience as well as knowledge from my college days. Plus I get a half decent wage too even though I'm an apprèntice.

I'll shop around for a sharpening tool and check the library for books. Are the 2 steps worth buying? I've never used one..
post #5 of 6

Get some stones if you can.  The sooner the better.  Your knives are your livelihood as a cook and they deserve to be sharp, taken care of by you and only you.  Hate to sound like a hippie, but they are an extension of yourself.  I go with a #1000 and #6000 set of stones.

 

Books are up to you.  Browse the library, bookstores, online.  You'll find whats right for you.

 

As far as recipes go, if you want to be well versed there are dozens of recipes to 'memorize'.  And by that I mean retain RATIOS.  Most of the stuff I talk about is all about doing by repetition; a basic pasta, gnocchi, biscuit, mousse, ice cream base, mayo/aioli, even a basic white cake or muffin recipe.  Even knowing a ratio of sugar to salt for a basic, say, bacon cure is great knowledge.  All this stuff comes with time, but is well worth it.

 

p.s.  write everything down.  Seriously, you'll be ahead of the game if you do.

post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the great advice.

I try to write everything down that I do. Certain recipes, techniques etc.
I like your idea of knowing some basic ratios. I'll definitely look some up.

I'm lucky to work with a good chef too. Although I am an apprèntice, I do sweets, mains, starters and plating up during service. It's all good experience!
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