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Autumn Soup Season Shall Be Kicking Off - Page 2

post #31 of 48

Siduri-

 

I'm quite surprised that,  as a Bostonian,  you have not at least raised an eyebrow at Margcata's expressed preference for Manhattan eek.gif  Clam Chowder.   

 

Don't you have an old family recipe for an honest-to-God Boston chowdah to offer her?  Just as a suggestion, of course. cool.gif

 

If not, I would be happy to offer my old family recipe, developed after spending 12 years around Boston as a student.

     Well, copied from The New England Cookbook, actually.

 

Just as a suggestion, of course.

 

Mike wink.gif

 

Hint: there are no tomatoes involved!

travelling gourmand
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post #32 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeLM View Post

Siduri-

 

I'm quite surprised that,  as a Bostonian,  you have not at least raised an eyebrow at Margcata's expressed preference for Manhattan eek.gif  Clam Chowder.   

 

Don't you have an old family recipe for an honest-to-God Boston chowdah to offer her?  Just as a suggestion, of course. cool.gif

 

If not, I would be happy to offer my old family recipe, developed after spending 12 years around Boston as a student.

     Well, copied from The New England Cookbook, actually.

 

Just as a suggestion, of course.

 

Mike wink.gif

 

Hint: there are no tomatoes involved!

I wish i did have a recipe for Boston Chowda, but my "old family" is from Italy - both parents born (bawn) in northern (nawthin)  Tuscany, brought to the states in the 20s as kids. I was born (bawn) and raised in Boston, though, and culturally I'm a bostonian, more than an Italian in many ways.  I do enjoy chowda, but never made it, since it wasn;t in my family's tradition.  I still speak bostonian after 37 years in Rome - not the bostonian of Kennedy, but the bostonian you might find in south boston,  the north (noth) end or in medford (meffid) (where i was born (bawn). 

 

Manhattan clam chowder, never much liked it - not least because it calls itself chowder, which is a word that implies a thick milky soup. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #33 of 48
Thread Starter 

Mike and Siduri,

 

 

Mike, offering a New England style Clam chowder;

 

I am not much of a "creamy or milk" texture Pasta Sauce, Soup, Chowder or Stew person as I have an intolerance to cow milk; I appreciate your kind offer for a recipe, however, cannot medically.

 

Besides I really do prefer Evoo, shallot or spring onion, a bit of garlic, dried red chili pepper, herbs or capers & anchovy based & / or Tomatoes or classic pinenut and basil Pesto or Puttanesca or Bolognese or Marinara. Fresh Tomatoes. I am Milanese on paternal and French on maternal.   

 

I like my Manhattan Clam Chowder, and since we rarely get over to Manhattan since my dad passed on in 2010 I have learnt to make one we all like once in a great while.

 

Have a lovely Labor Day Wkend.

Marge.  


Edited by margcata - 8/30/12 at 2:09am
post #34 of 48

Siduri-

 

Well, you certainly haven't lost your feel for the Boston accent!  lol.gif

 

And Margi, I can easily see how a milk allergy would hamper your enjoyment of any New England style chowdah.

God knows how one made with soy milk would taste.  crazy.gif

 

Anyway, I hope you both have a nice Labor Day weekend (to the extent you celebrate that.)  We're going over to our son's house for a cookout, even though the remains of former Hurricane Isaac are due to arrive in Chicago Saturday morning. His grilling and dining spots are both under cover.

 

Best, 

 

Mike

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post #35 of 48

not one mentioned of a kurbis suppe  or pumpkin soup.   here in Austria i have learned they take there pumpkins serious.  and a kurbissuppe mit kerbiskernöl und kurbiskern is a normal item on any menu during the fall season.  roast or fry the pumpkin with onion in butter and olive oil well but with no color then add a stock or clear chicken soup or water.  cook, puree, strain if you are in a fancy restaurant, but if you are in a local gausthaus the dont strain.  season, finish with cream, and top with roasted pumpkin seeds and a bit of good quality pumpkin seed oil.  the best oil  i have ever tasted comes from stiermark in Austria.  like i said they take there pumpkins serious here.

post #36 of 48

kurbissuppe mit kerbiskernöl und kurbiskern - google translate says Roasted Pumkin soup with kerbiskernöl und kurbiskern ?? Pumkins seeds and cream??

That sounds pretty good to me!!  is it a heavy cream or soured?  I like sour cream & fresh chives along with the seeds

post #37 of 48

Gazpacho

Ingredients

  • 6 ripe tomatoes, peeled and chopped
  • 1 purple onion, finely chopped
  • 1 cucumber, peeled, seeded, chopped
  • 1 sweet red bell pepper (or green) seeded and chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 1-2 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 Tbsp chopped fresh chives
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
  • 6 or more drops of Tabasco sauce to taste
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce (omit for vegetarian option)
  • 4 cups tomato juice

Method

Combine all ingredients. Blend slightly, to desired consistency. Place in non-metal, non-reactive storage container, cover tightly and refrigerate overnight, allowing flavors to blend

post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by snake666 View Post

Gazpacho

 

 

The least you could do when copy/pasting stuff from another website is cite your source: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/gazpacho/

post #39 of 48

I think Cullen Skink is one of the great fish soups as long as its made with finnan haddie.http://www.scottishrecipes.co.uk/cullenskink.htmhttp://www.scottishrecipes.co.uk/cullenskink.htm

post #40 of 48
Thread Starter 

French Fries, Kippers, and Snake666;

 

Thanks for all your contributions on your fave soups.

 

Please note: I live in the Madrid Capital Centre for professional commitments.

 

About a month or two ago, I have posted two recipe variations on the Gazpacho cold tomato soup in the Recipe Section.

 

One is the classic served throughout the country at restaurants and Tapas Bars, and there is a photo I had taken on this Soup Thread as well;

 

Additionally, I posted a modern take on the classic Gazpacho posted in Recipes and served with a scoop or dollop of Avocado Pesto on top.

 

Snake666:  In Spain, Worcestshire is not an ingredient employed in classic Málagueño ( of Málaga,Andalusia ) Gazpacho nor Salmorejo which is the Cordóba Province pastoral variety of the cold tomato soup and is prepared differently. Salmorejo is prepared without the vegetables and is served with hard boiled egg chopped finely on top, day old bread sautéed croutons and viruta strips of Iberian Air Dried Acorn Fed Ham.

 

Have a lovely Labor Day Wkend,

Marge.


Edited by margcata - 8/31/12 at 2:10am
post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by kostendorf View Post

not one mentioned of a kurbis suppe  or pumpkin soup.   here in Austria i have learned they take there pumpkins serious.  and a kurbissuppe mit kerbiskernöl und kurbiskern is a normal item on any menu during the fall season.  roast or fry the pumpkin with onion in butter and olive oil well but with no color then add a stock or clear chicken soup or water.  cook, puree, strain if you are in a fancy restaurant, but if you are in a local gausthaus the dont strain.  season, finish with cream, and top with roasted pumpkin seeds and a bit of good quality pumpkin seed oil.  the best oil  i have ever tasted comes from stiermark in Austria.  like i said they take there pumpkins serious here.


Thanks for that. I have a friend who's wife absolutely loves pumpkin. Almost obsesses over it. A couple years ago there was a pumpkin shortage due to some climate condition. She was running around like a mad woman buying up all the canned stock she could find! I just ordered her a gift.. I had no idea there was pumpkin seed oil. I found Styrian pumpkinseed oil on amazon. smile.gif I am thinking a drizzle of it would be good on her soups and roasted fresh pumpkin dishes. I have one question, a reviewer mentioned it was thick like motor oil... should she thin it with another oil? Any recommendations on using it?

post #42 of 48
Thread Starter 

Chef Kostendorf,

 

Thank your for your Austrian soup recipe contribution.

 

Ciao,

Marge Cintrano.

post #43 of 48
Thread Starter 

Buon Giorno,

 

For those interested, I had found a treasure on soups;  

Book titled:

Zuppa, Soups From The Italian Countryside

Author: Anna Bianchi

 

*** note: zuppa is soup in Italian.

 

Have lovely Labor Day Wkend.

Marge.

post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by margcata View Post

... Snake666:  In Spain, Worcestshire is not an ingredient employed in classic Málagueño ( of Málaga,Andalusia ) Gazpacho nor Salmorejo which is the Cordóba Province pastoral variety of the cold tomato soup and is prepared differently. Salmorejo is prepared without the vegetables and is served with hard boiled egg chopped finely on top, day old bread sautéed croutons and viruta strips of Iberian Air Dried Acorn Fed Ham ...

 

Marg,

As English is my first language and Hawaiian my second,

I was wondering if you could translate this for me.

When I did a Goggle Translate, but well, let’s just say that it gets lost somewhere.

TIA,

K~girl

(once again, Kane means Man, and k~girl kind of explains that part)

post #45 of 48
Thread Starter 

Kaneo,

 

 

Photo 1:  Salmorejo de Cordóba, Andalusia ( Tomato Cold Soup from Cordóba )

 

Ingredients:  Fresh tomatoes, day old bread, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Salt, a pinch of Sugar, and Sherry Vinegar with a splash or shotglass of Spanish Brandy.

 

Garnishes:  Can be bread croutons, virutas or strips of Iberian air dried acorn fed Ham, hard boiled egg sliced finely and / or minced bell red roasted pepper, garlic, onion, and / or cucumber.  

 

Designation of Origin: Cordóba, Andalusia - Southern Spain.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo 2:  Gazpacho - Classic Cold Tomato Soup of Málaga.

 

Designation of Origin:  Málaga, Andalusia, Southern Spain.

 

Ingredients:  Fresh tomatoes deseeded and peeled, diced cucumber, diced red bell pepper, diced green pepper, onion, Extra virgin olive oil, Sherry vinegar, bread croutons from day old bread, Spanish Brandy, salt and freshly ground black pepper with a pinch of sugar.

 

Garnishes:  bread croutons, diced onion, green or red bell pepper and cucumber diced.  

 

 

 

 

Kaneo: The two tomato cold soups are quite  different in Texture and Color; the hue of Orange Red in the the Salmorejo can be quite Orange in tone, is due to the Brandy, Bread Croutons, and in some homes, they blend in the Ham and Egg as well. This is a pastoral cold soup that has been prepared for centuries in a land locked mountainous province.

 

The Gazpacho which is much finer in texture yet thicker than a tomato juice, is a deep red orange tone and this is due to the red bell pepper and tomatoes. Some people leave out the green pepper which would alter the color, and add only red bell pepper.

 

There are many modern versions of this cold tomato soup throughout Spain.

 

Hope this assists.

Marge Cintrano.

post #46 of 48
Thread Starter 

Kaneo,

 

In Classic Spanish Gazpacho:

 

Worcestershire Sauce ( Lea & Perrins, one of the most known manufacturers ) has been used in  modern version Gazpachos to make it spicy and has never  been a classic  ingreident of the Gazpacho.

 

Modernist takes on the Gazpacho also include the use of fruit instead of tomatoes, and other vegetables. Another classic Gazpacho is Almond & Grape Cold Soup called Gazpacho Blanco as the Chilled Soup is White.  

 

According to wikipedia; Lea and Perrins, Worcestershire is made of :  tamarind, anchovies, vinegar, garlic, onion, black pepper, cloves, lemon amongst other ingreidents.

 

Hope this assists.

Marge.

post #47 of 48

So Marg, could I use any type of Brandy, also any type of Ham?

And then you refer to ‘Classic Cold Tomato Soup of Malaga’ , why is it called Classic?  You used classic a few times, in different context and posts.

Lastly, is Gazpacho exclusive to Spain, that seems to be your meaning, but I might still be getting lost in the translation. 

 

TIA,

K~girl ( kane is man in Hawaiian, after all I am a girl, k~girl is best )

post #48 of 48
Thread Starter 

Kaneo,

 

1) Classic is veered toward  traditional;  not modern or fusion. 

 

In the European Union countries, especially Spain, Greece and Italy; the Governments promote their classic traditional gastronomy, historical hotels and wines to increase tourism.

 

These two types of cold tomato soups are Spanish Government National Traditional or Classic Dishes, as Paella is; and the Government Tourism Industry promotes its regional gastronomy and regional wines.

 

2)  I would never employ a non Spanish Brandy nor Ham in my Spanish Gazpacho. 

 

If you wish to do so, that is your individual decision to eat as you enjoy.  

 

Have nice labor day.

Marge.

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