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health issues

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

wondering how most of you guys stay in shape and good health in the kitchens. Do you guys have a workout regiment? I am 33 and have gain weight am at 240 pounds at 5'9 in height. I use to lift weights alot and in good shape at about 190-200 pounds. Now I am always tired.

post #2 of 29

Don't smoke or drink, get regular rest, run, eat healthy.. it's not rocket science, good luck.

post #3 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrelRJ View Post

Don't smoke or drink, get regular rest, run, eat healthy.. it's not rocket science, good luck.


Word

post #4 of 29

Easier said than done.

post #5 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post

Easier said than done.

Based on what? not smoking and drinking is easy if you have any will power or self control.

 

Getting enough rest and running are, as well, you just have to commit to any of these things.

post #6 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrelRJ View Post

Based on what? not smoking and drinking is easy if you have any will power or self control.

 

Getting enough rest and running are, as well, you just have to commit to any of these things.


Based on years and years of medical research that shows that breaking an addiction is very hard. The body develops a dependance on and an actual physical need for the substance. Your casual dismissal of something as serious as a smoking or alcohol addiction means you know absolutely nothing about what you're talking about. Quit trying to be mr. tough guy with your flippant responses to everything you reply to.

Apprentichef - Six stitches to go home early and you can't die until your shift is over.

 

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Apprentichef - Six stitches to go home early and you can't die until your shift is over.

 

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post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apprentichef View Post


Based on years and years of medical research that shows that breaking an addiction is very hard. The body develops a dependance on and an actual physical need for the substance. Your casual dismissal of something as serious as a smoking or alcohol addiction means you know absolutely nothing about what you're talking about. Quit trying to be mr. tough guy with your flippant responses to everything you reply to.

 

I think the OP was about how to stay healthy in this industry, not having to do anything with addiction and substance abuse.  RJ was simply replying to that question.  Although RJ's replies are sometimes 'tough guy' and 'flippant', I think he just tries to cut through the BS that floats around here, trying to stay on topic and focus on the actual thread.  You might try the same.
 

post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apprentichef View Post


Based on years and years of medical research that shows that breaking an addiction is very hard. The body develops a dependance on and an actual physical need for the substance. Your casual dismissal of something as serious as a smoking or alcohol addiction means you know absolutely nothing about what you're talking about. Quit trying to be mr. tough guy with your flippant responses to everything you reply to.

Don't talk to me about addiction, I know firsthand more about it than you ever will. Don't ever start smoking or drinking, and nobody would put themselves in such a position. Nobody is forced to use drugs, friend.

 

 

Don't like my replies? get over it and ignore me, i'm here for industry and food questions, not to weed through grab bag off topic threads.

post #9 of 29

Quitting smoking is not easy, BUT possible.

I did it 33 years ago . After My first heart attack my cardiologist pointed at a sign he had put up behind his desk.

 

"Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later ;

Only the smart ones do it while they are still alive ! ! !

 

For 7 years he pointed at this sign and asked me every time if I am too stupid to read  ? Back home in Germany we have an old  saying that tells you that once you reach the age of 40 you are considered to be grown up and therefore smart .

A few weeks before my 40th birthday I did become a nonsmoker.  I am not sure yet if I turned smarter on my 40th, but I do  very well without my cigarettes

I did the same with drinking alcohol ten years later when the same cardiologist told me I had to exercise to loose weight. I simply stopped the beer,wine and booze and did loose weght the lazy way.
I told myswelf at the time that beeing a drunk tor 50 years was enoungh and I promised myself a case of Don Perignon should I reach 100 .

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

Reply

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

Reply
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by berndy View Post

Quitting smoking is not easy, BUT possible.

I did it 33 years ago . After My first heart attack my cardiologist pointed at a sign he had put up behind his desk.

 

"Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later ;

Only the smart ones do it while they are still alive ! ! !

 

For 7 years he pointed at this sign and asked me every time if I am too stupid to read  ? Back home in Germany we have an old  saying that tells you that once you reach the age of 40 you are considered to be grown up and therefore smart .

A few weeks before my 40th birthday I did become a nonsmoker.  I am not sure yet if I turned smarter on my 40th, but I do  very well without my cigarettes

I did the same with drinking alcohol ten years later when the same cardiologist told me I had to exercise to loose weight. I simply stopped the beer,wine and booze and did loose weght the lazy way.
I told myswelf at the time that beeing a drunk tor 50 years was enoungh and I promised myself a case of Don Perignon should I reach 100 .

Congrats on both accounts.

post #11 of 29

Thank you,

And I did it cold turkey both times ,  and  now hope I can afford my Dom Perignon and still  be well eough to enjuy it too

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

Reply

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

Reply
post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrelRJ View Post

Don't talk to me about addiction, I know firsthand more about it than you ever will. Don't ever start smoking or drinking, and nobody would put themselves in such a position. Nobody is forced to use drugs, friend.

 

 

Don't like my replies? get over it and ignore me, i'm here for industry and food questions, not to weed through grab bag off topic threads.

 

I understand what you're saying, but sometimes, saying things a different way can get you more acceptance.  Sometimes people need to just realize that they need to do stuff, but beating them over the head over and over again doesn't help.

post #13 of 29

I'm going to agree with Apprentichef  here.  Now, as with many other replies of yours SquirrelRJ,  you come off very aggravating with your attitude.  As far as smoking and/or drinking issues, I sure as sure don't need any "tough guy" or "flippant" anybody telling me anything.  It's not an easy fight to quit habits such as these, and I'll also include "over-eating".  It's also not so easy to stop from choking the bageebies out of every smartyclown telling me to quit.  

 

Quote:
I know firsthand more about  << any given thing >>  than you ever will.

Yeah,  OK,  I'm happy for you. 

post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

I'm going to agree with Apprentichef  here.  Now, as with many other replies of yours SquirrelRJ,  you come off very aggravating with your attitude.  As far as smoking and/or drinking issues, I sure as sure don't need any "tough guy" or "flippant" anybody telling me anything.  It's not an easy fight to quit habits such as these, and I'll also include "over-eating".  It's also not so easy to stop from choking the bageebies out of every smartyclown telling me to quit.  

 

Yeah,  OK,  I'm happy for you. 

Yet again, I don't care how I am perceived by anyone, whether here or in my everyday life. My "attitude" has me where I am to this point, I think i'll stick with it.

 

Nobody said it was an easy fight, hence why I said don't start in the first place, it's a choice you made, deal with the consequences.

post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrelRJ View Post

Yet again, I don't care how I am perceived by anyone, whether here or in my everyday life.

People that truly feel that way don't take the time to proclaim it.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post

People that truly feel that way don't take the time to proclaim it.

Sure thing, Dr.Phil lol.gif

 

It definitely took a lot of time and effort to make the statement I did.

post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrelRJ View Post

 

It definitely took a lot of time and effort to make the statement I did.

Didn't say that it took a lot of time and effort.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post

Didn't say that it took a lot of time and effort.

Keep stirring that pot.

 

You can have the last word. rolleyes.gif

post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrelRJ View Post

Keep stirring that pot.

 

You can have the last word. rolleyes.gif

Yippee!!!

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrelRJ View Post

Yet again, I don't care how I am perceived by anyone, whether here or in my everyday life. My "attitude" has me where I am to this point, I think i'll stick with it.

 

There you go.    Make a really good statement.         I'm happy for you still. 

post #21 of 29

Ooookkkk boys.  Can we move on now?

post #22 of 29

Hi Guys, I know it seems I am not around much these days but I pop by more often then most think. So either get back to the topic of health in the kitchen or move on on to another thread. I am close to locking this one down.

 

 

Also IMHO, being a good healthy Chef is a hard thing. We eat too much at irregular times and most of it is fat and salt. my diet is horrible after sampling half a dozen things every morning, who wants to eat? by lunch it"s a mess the only thing I have real control over is my dinner and no. I don't always make myself the perfect healthy dinner.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #23 of 29

Getting proper rest can be problematic.

I cover a couple of dinner shifts, come in early for ordering, even earlier (up at 4am) to ensure Sunday brunch goes well, so my sleep schedule is quite erratic.

I recommend drinking lots of water, try to limit the coffee, and more importantly, sodas.

Get in the habit of doing a few push ups and crunches before work, daily or every other day.

Move briskly through the kitchen (as if you're not already).

It may sound counterintuitive, but even a little exercise, which initially drains you of energy, will give you more energy in the long run.

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Jim View Post

Getting proper rest can be problematic.

I cover a couple of dinner shifts, come in early for ordering, even earlier (up at 4am) to ensure Sunday brunch goes well, so my sleep schedule is quite erratic.

I recommend drinking lots of water, try to limit the coffee, and more importantly, sodas.

Get in the habit of doing a few push ups and crunches before work, daily or every other day.

Move briskly through the kitchen (as if you're not already).

It may sound counterintuitive, but even a little exercise, which initially drains you of energy, will give you more energy in the long run.

true enough, especially the water and exercise.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
post #25 of 29

I cut and split firewood for exercise. Stay away from white sugar and high fructose corn syrup. Eat lots of grains, vegies, fiber, and high protein low cholesterol food. For stress I practice cultivating choiceless awareness.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #26 of 29

The only thing I can recommend doing is start forming other healthy daily habits. Start with a small run at a time of day you can always do it. Humans are creatures of routine, and once you start setting better routines you will become healthier.

Apprentichef - Six stitches to go home early and you can't die until your shift is over.

 

Reply

Apprentichef - Six stitches to go home early and you can't die until your shift is over.

 

Reply
post #27 of 29

There is an old saying.....never trust a skinny Chef. I m 5'8 and am 178  It is important to understand that was said at the turn of the century and that most of those Chefs died at an early age or are in dire health. Look at Santi Santiago who died in his fifties,  and of course Chef Prudhomme who is still alive but had to change his diet around or he would have died.  I this profession it is our job to taste EVERYTHING.  What we need to maintain is control and understand that all things in moderation are what is best.  With that said we need to count all those tastings as our small meals here and there.  What i do is have a salad or yogurt before work i drink lots of water have my usual coffee- not more than 2 cups a day.  I f I need more zip i drink some green tea.  Its a little better source of usable caffeine for us.

Just remember keep things in moderation I don't smoke. (Three years now) That is a big thing for us as professionals. You will find that your energy level and your pallet will be better when you quit.  Smoking is a big thing to change however it is the best thing you could do to change your quality of life.

I try to exercise but work is my exercise during the week.  On weekends i go for a walk and relax. After work i drink some wine or champagne.  Again all things in moderation.  And drink lots of water. You will find your self feeling better.

 

Beuna Seurte Z 

post #28 of 29

That is good advices. I`m young and just read Daniel Boulud`s book, it have similar tips and for myself i drink water very much when i work. Are you drink mineral water or normal? I drink boths. Before shift i dont eat so much, maybe something light. Fruit and quark. What comes to drinkin coffee i drink it literally too much. I try too replace it with tea, but sometimes it just it`s easier to take coffee. I`m never smoke cigarettes, but does light sodas make your palates be worse than without? If i dont drink beer, i drink light sodas pretty much.

-Kalle

post #29 of 29

hes right, i used to be a smoker and a drinker... i smoked weed, cigarettes and drank, its alll will power and if u have the right mind set anyone can stop

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