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Recommended Line Up of Knives Based on Core Knives

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

 

Long-time lurker on the various forums since I started heavily researching J knives a few months back.  I won't go into my background now, or ask too much of the typical "what brand" questions.  The lurking has answered many of those questions and I'll save the rest for another thread.

 

This question is about what styles/sizes of knives to pick in order to work on building a complete set without redundancies.  I'm not one to have six 240s when 1 or 2 would do.

 

I made the jump with a 120mm Tojiro ITK Shirogami Petty and 165 Nakiri.  The purpose of these knives was to be introduced to real Japanese steel and carbon steel.  I plan on using my 120 as a large paring knife/small petty, and the nakiri was mainly to practice sharpening, and experimenting with cutting styles with the flat edge.  They were inexpensive and I plan on practicing with them and building a set around them.

 

I know the nakiri will be redundant once I build up a collection, but it'll serve its training purposes till then.

 

I'm debating on whether I want to pull the trigger on the Konosuke 240 gyuto or go with the JCK Inazuma line or Ginga or Sakayuki etc.... I will be getting that size next when I figure out what I want to spend according to my skill.

 

Finally, the main point of my post:

 

I want to know the core list of sizes and shapes I should get when my set is complete-ish.

 

I'm considering these sizes:

120mm petty

150mm honesuki or petty

180/210 petty

240 gyuto

270 suji

rounded out at the end by the bread knife and possibly a deba.

 

The problem I'm running into is the middle part.  Is a honesuki really necessary? I do like to buy whole poultry and break it down, but would a dedicated 150 honesuki be redundant with my 120 petty and a petty in the 180/210 range? I could use it as a stainless knife for citrus slicing and bar work as well.

 

With the 120 petty/parer I have now, what would the next size petty be? 180/210... I would use it for slicing steaks to fan for plating, for other small slicing tasks, for trimming if I didn't get the honesuki, and other small slicer tasks (coring peppers/whatever) when the 240 wouldn't be practical.

 

Should I even get a 210 petty if I eventually want the 270 suji? Would that size be awkward slicing a small steak? I just used my western 10.5" slicer on seared tuna and could really have used a proper edge for that.  However, the length was great and with the slight clearance benefit from the wa handles I want a J suji would have been great.

 

What knife would I use for fileting small fish (fish you would buy whole for home use, not tunas or salmons).  I'm thinking I could lop the head off with a german chef's and filet with the 180/210 suji.  Is that what people do without mioroshis or debas?

 

Sorry for the long winded post, but I wanted to give as much of the basic info I could to help the answers. I need help narrowing my list so I can pull the trigger again. What should the next size up be from the 120 based on the uses I illustrated? Honesuki or just the next size up and skip 150 altogether?  Although not necessary for my post, for what its worth, I have the Bester, Beston, Suehira stone set and am practicing with the Tojiros.

 

Thanks for making it through my redundant post about avoiding redundancy in knives. :)

post #2 of 6

Andrew,

Consider working backwards, looking at how you cook and then selecting the best knives for the job.  As a home cook it's likely you'll expand your cooking repertoire and use more advanced cooking techniques based on your high performance knives.  

 

If you break down a lot of poultry and want to make chicken or duck ballotine, then a 150 honesuki is great.  I also use one for squaring off racks of ribs and Frenching chops.  A lot of people grab it from the knife rack to cut veggies.  

 

Your 120 petty and 185 nakiri should eliminate the need for a 150 petty.  But you have to decide if the extra 30mm is that important.  A 180 may be a more practical jump in size.

 

A 180/210 petty is a terrific knife and an excellent small slicer.  I love my 180 Konosuki HD and agree it may be the right size if you're getting a 270 suji.  

 

Your nakiri should be great for all the thin veggie work the a Kono HD 240 gyuto is so good at.  Maybe go with a robust gyuto for thick skinned fruits, squash and other appropriate tasks, 

 

A 270 suji is another great knife to have and a lot of folks prefer a 300 if they have the counter space.

 

JMHO

post #3 of 6

double post

post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mano View Post

 

 

A 180/210 petty is a terrific knife and an excellent small slicer.  I love my 180 Konosuki HD and agree it may be the right size if you're getting a 270 suji.  

 

 

Thank you for your reply. Your advice helped me confirm my "want list."  As a follow up, if I didn't want to get a 270 suji in the near future (reserving a like new 10.5" German slicer that I'll tune up) would the 210 petty be just as useful as the 180? Or slightly too large for some petty tasks?

 

Andrew

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewbernst View Post

Thank you for your reply. Your advice helped me confirm my "want list."  As a follow up, if I didn't want to get a 270 suji in the near future (reserving a like new 10.5" German slicer that I'll tune up) would the 210 petty be just as useful as the 180? Or slightly too large for some petty tasks?

 

Andrew

Not having a 210 I couldn't say.  I was searching for a 210 petty -which some people use as a primary knife- but got a deal on a 180 and haven't looked back.  For practical purposes I'd be hard pressed to say the difference would be significant, especially since you have a slicer.

post #6 of 6

The two knives I reach for most are my 240 Gyuto and my 150 Petty.  Besides those I have a 300 Yanagi, a 180 Deba and a 150 Honesuki Maru.  I don't consider the Petty a stout enough boning knife the way I use one.  I also have a heavy cleaver for carcass work.  All these extra blades are handy to have and serve a purpose as I break down a lot of meats, but for every day meal prep it's the Gyuto and the Petty.

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