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yeast

post #1 of 2
Thread Starter 

I recently ran out of my favorite yeast and now I have to use  my back up, Red Star yeast.  I am not crazy about it, I noticed that I have to have tempts hotter than with the other yeast and sometimes it takes a long long time for my dough to rise.  Do I need to use more of the red Star yeast than I normally would? And if so how much more?  I do not enjoy yeasty tasting bread. I do use a bread flour and not AP, AP is for cookies in my mind. I usually use about 2 and a quarter tsp. also I noticed that when the bread is done baking it feels heavy, like it is  under cooked, but it is cooked through.  Do I need to knead the dough more?  I usually knead until the dough feels silky and elastic. I also make a good quantity of bread at times, should I put the dough in the refrigerator while I work with my first batch, to slow the rise on the rest so that it does not over proof?

 

Thank you

post #2 of 2

Have you tried increasing the amount of yeast? Maybe you won't get a bad taste in your bread.

 

If you lower yeast activation temperature (even if the dough takes longer to rise), does the dough still feel heavy?

 

Have you considered changing proofing temperature for your dough? Your strain of yeast may like a higher temperature.

 

Have you tried preferment?

 

Have you tried different brands of yeast besides Red Star? There are many out there for sale online. Red Star may just happen not to like your mix of ingredients.

 

Finally, if you bake often, have you considered maintaining your own dough starter once you find a strain of yeast that you like?

 

Many kinds of bread taste better with AP flour. Bread flour can easily make your bread too tough. Your bread may benefit from extra gluten in bread flour if you weigh the dough down with heavy ingredients such as whole grains, coarse rye flour, etc, but otherwise it's not really necessary. AP flour has a good amount of gluten.

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