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first time poaching an egg

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

so i for the first time i tried poaching an egg. in a few simple words, FAIL BOAT! i tried it 2 differnt ways. first i brought water to roiling boil then swirled water into a vortex and dropped an egg from a ramekin into water. next i tried the same thing just without swirling water. both times the most of the egg whites pulled away from the yolk leaving very little whites around it. i know u r going to loose some whites but trust me when i say i lost to much whites. did i forget to do something or do i just need more practice?

post #2 of 23

Drop the water temperature to a simmer, i.e gentle tiny bubbles, 160°-180°F, you are poaching, not boiling!
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
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post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
I guess that would make more sense LOL good to know thanx
post #4 of 23

Pete is correct. Only thing I do different is add a dash of vinegar to water

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #5 of 23

Yes the vortex method doesn't work very well if the water is boiling.  Just don't add too much vinegar because then your egg will reek.  Use a slotted spoon to remove and place on a paper towel to dry.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 23

Oops redface.gif, forgot to mention the vinegar/lemon juice, the slight bit of acid helps the whites to coagulate around the yolk.

 

FWIW, I've found the "vortex method" more trouble that it is worth, and I am used to poaching 6-12 eggs at a time.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #7 of 23

Bigger the pot, the better the poach, too.  A larger pot keeps the temp up and gives the whites more time to set as it drops to the bottom, giving it almost a tear drop shape.

post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanx everyone! Ill make sure to try those tips next time although ill probly use lemon because I really really hate vinegar lol
post #9 of 23
Feq tips : poching eggs must be frash eggs !! If u nut do it witg
fresh eggs the whits gonne spred all over .
Open the egg on a small plate , n simmer water
in a pan 6 cups for 4 eggs , with a bit of acidty
lemon drops will make a very ggo work ,
Slide the egg into tge water cerfully , n let it
simmer until all the white coming to be firm
take the egg out with sallted spoon n strain it
n dry it on paper towel. In the professional poching the egg
white are covering all the egg n is look like an envelop ,
If u want ro do it so when u slide tge egg u need to cuttlle her
inside the water for the vegining until she gatinng the shape.
Goodluck man , n the frashnest is tge importents !!
post #10 of 23

OK.    This might be a Bohemian style of doing it but ...

 

I use a larger saute pan, maybe 2-inches of water, a few drops lemon/vinegar and the magic tool ... tuna can.   Yeah, I said tuna can.   Simmer the water and drop in the egg.  Wait for the right "look", pull up the can and scoop up/out the egg with a slotted spoon.  I can usually do four(4) at a crack.      NO problemmo. ​

post #11 of 23

Adding to my previous post, I use a 14" electric skillet with a sous vide controller set for 165°F, drop in an egg every 30 seconds, eight eggs around, when the eighth one goes in, the first one comes out and is replaced and repeated every 30 seconds, 120 poached eggs every hour for each skillet.
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
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post #12 of 23

OK. I'm curious. Where the hey would you need 120 poached eggs in an hour?      My first guess was aircraft carrier.

post #13 of 23

Very fresh eggs, max 2 days old.Bowl of iced water, crack eggs into gently boiling water and poach for exactly 2 mins, remove with slotted spoon and place in iced water.When cool trim the fine skirt and replace in water, keep in fridge till needed.Service place egg in gently boiling water for 60 seconds exactly, dry and plate.

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

OK. I'm curious. Where the hey would you need 120 poached eggs in an hour?      My first guess was aircraft carrier.

Sunday Brunch buffet featuring Eggs Benedict, Eggs Florentine, and Eggs with Smoked Salmon.

 

Gave the conveyer toaster a workout also crazy.gif

 

Oh, 300 covers in two hours...

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
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post #15 of 23

Not quite true. However the larger the cicumference of pot the better not the depth. If you have use a Brassierre type pot.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #16 of 23

Freshness of eggs is key, the older the egg the more the white is going to spread.

 

Another key is vinegar. I like using 15ml of cheap white vinegar per 1L of water.

 

Transferring the eggs to an icebath from the poaching pot if not being served immediately. Otherwise I do like to pass them through some regular non-acidulated water to remove the vinegar flavor. I also don't use salt when poaching eggs. I always reheat them in salted water for service.

 

My technique for poaching eggs at home versus for service varies slightly.
 

post #17 of 23
R u talking about sinttetic vinegar ??
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Yes the vortex method doesn't work very well if the water is boiling.  Just don't add too much vinegar because then your egg will reek.  Use a slotted spoon to remove and place on a paper towel to dry.

 

Or into an ice bath depending on the service. If you are serving immediately, leave them in the spoon, and just lay the spoon onto the towel, and let it rest, and serve with a quickness.

 

Best to shock them so the yolks don't continue to cook, and once you have then shocked, line 'em up on towels to absorb moisture. When it comes to putting an order out, simply reheat in the poaching water for 45seconds, remove with slotted spoon, dab on a side towel to remove excess water, and serve.

~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

OK. I'm curious. Where the hey would you need 120 poached eggs in an hour?      My first guess was aircraft carrier.

any halfway steady breakfast/brunch service. That's only 60 orders, in a place that seats over 120 heads, that is NOT unrealistic. 

~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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post #20 of 23

Jono when I was a kid I worked in London for my family food supply company. This meant I visited various top flight hotel and restaurant kitchen.I think it was the Savoy that produced Eggs B for a set lunch for up to 300+ covers at the weekend.The chef who explained the method I posted said that they would trim the eggs to the "Savoy" shape the day before, then heat and plate in batches of 50 so Eggs B number 300 would be to table 7 minutes after the first 50 arrived at table.

He also gave me his method of making the perfect scrambled eggs using a balloon whisk and a bowl over boiling water, you get the right consistency then beat in ice cubes of frozen cream to stop them cooking on. 

post #21 of 23

808 Jono202   In a commercial setting, if we laid them on towels, the health dept would write us a violation.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

808 Jono202   In a commercial setting, if we laid them on towels, the health dept would write us a violation.

 

 

While storing, they are on a lined sheet pan in a reach in( I see where my above post can be confusing), for service, we would simply warm them through, leaving the yolk nice and runny, pat dry, or while still in a slotted spoon, rest briefly on a towel(side/bar towel). I am not talking about storing them like that. 

~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kippers View Post

Jono when I was a kid I worked in London for my family food supply company. This meant I visited various top flight hotel and restaurant kitchen.I think it was the Savoy that produced Eggs B for a set lunch for up to 300+ covers at the weekend.The chef who explained the method I posted said that they would trim the eggs to the "Savoy" shape the day before, then heat and plate in batches of 50 so Eggs B number 300 would be to table 7 minutes after the first 50 arrived at table.

He also gave me his method of making the perfect scrambled eggs using a balloon whisk and a bowl over boiling water, you get the right consistency then beat in ice cubes of frozen cream to stop them cooking on. 

 

Damn, that is pretty awesome! I would be very interested in seeing how those scrambled eggs turn out!

~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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