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Transporting Guacamole

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I'm bringing a guacamole to a vegan party later this week but not sure how to transport it.  Will it get brown by the time I get to the party? 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #2 of 18

Yes but put a plastic wrap right on it and mix it up when you get there.

post #3 of 18

And make sure the plastic wrap makes contact with the guacamole itself, making sure there's no air at all between the guacamole and the plastic wrap. If you do it right it will not go brown. I sometimes keep guacamole that way overnight and it's still vibrant green the next day. 

post #4 of 18

2 things....i put thin slices of lemon on top of the guac if making ahead and it's always good even if made the day before...just pull the lemon slices off when you get there and give it a quick stir to incorporate any juice from the lemons...the mexicans leave the avacado pit in the bowl which works too, but tightly saran wrapped is key to whatever you do

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #5 of 18

Cartouche. Just make a wax paper round that sits on the surface of the Guac, pat it down to get air bubbles out, and then wrap it from there. Just a simple way of keeping the air off it.

~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 

I think I'll try all of that.  Except I'll put lime slices on it instead.  Thanks!

 

Any favorite guac recipes?  Mine is simple, diced tomato, red onion, cilantro and lime.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #7 of 18

Cryovac or even plain old foodsaver is the best way if its available.

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

 

Any favorite guac recipes?  Mine is simple, diced tomato, red onion, cilantro and lime.

haas avacados, tomatoes( small dice),white onion(small dice),fresh garlic(processed) salt, cilantro, jalapeno(extra small dice) and squeeze or two of lime or lemon 

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

the mexicans leave the avacado pit in the bowl which works too

I think I read on this very forum that this was an old wive's tale. 

post #10 of 18

It may be, but I have been doing it for years and that and a dash of fresh lemon juice keep it bright and green.
 

post #11 of 18

i used to work with a mexican woman and she always put the pit in the bowl....in mexico when/if you buy guacamole at the farmers market, you often find the pit in the container.....hard to argue with that!

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #12 of 18

Harold Mc Gee made the experiment and concluded that leaving the pits in the guacamole has the same effect as, say, leaving a light bulb in the guacamole:

 

Quote:

Dr. Harold McGee, a professor at Yale, conducted an experiment to find out what was really going on, as detailed in his book The Curious Cook: More Kitchen Science and Lore. He found after significant exposure to the air, only the area of the guacamole directly under the pit had not undergone oxidation. Replacing the avocado pit with a lightbulb had the same effect! Dr. McGee concluded that it was just the physical blocking of the avocado pit that prevented of oxidation.

 

 

More there: http://thescienceofcooking.tumblr.com/post/4637524324 

 


Edited by French Fries - 9/11/12 at 2:24pm
post #13 of 18

interesting french fries...thanks for researching and sharing that.... who knew?  funny how the old ways of doing things still get passed along and down.......do you want to be the one to break it to the mexicans?!!!! maybe it'll be easier in french, oui?wink.gif

truly though, thanks...

joey


Edited by durangojo - 9/11/12 at 4:36pm

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #14 of 18

You always hear that putting lime juice or lemon juice on avocado will keep it from turning.  Try this and you'll be surprised at the results!!  Buy just one avocado, cut it in half.  You can leave the pit in one half if you like, it won't make a difference.  Now, put a little lime or lemon juice on just one half.  Put absolutely nothing on the other half.  Remember which half is which.  Place each half in a zip loc bag and put in the refrigerator.  Check your avocado halves in a couple of hours, then check again a few hours later, or even the next day.  The half with the juice turned way darker than the half with nothing on it!!!!  For keeping guacamole as green as you can, place some type of saran wrap right on top of it so there is no air between the guacamole and the wrap.  Then put the cover on the container.

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

interesting french fries...thanks for researching and sharing that.... who knew?  funny how the old ways of doing things still get passed along and down.......do you want to be the one to tell the mexicans?!!!!

truly though, thanks...

joey

I have a Mexican friend, he always comes early when I make a barbecue party so he can prepare his guacamole on site. He always leaves the pits, and he always explains proudly to everyone who will listen that it prevents oxidation. I never said a word, never will. wink.gif

post #16 of 18

nice....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

Harold Mc Gee made the experiment and concluded that leaving the pits in the guacamole has the same effect as, say, leaving a light bulb in the guacamole:

 

Quote:

Dr. Harold McGee, a professor at Yale, conducted an experiment to find out what was really going on, as detailed in his book The Curious Cook: More Kitchen Science and Lore. He found after significant exposure to the air, only the area of the guacamole directly under the pit had not undergone oxidation. Replacing the avocado pit with a lightbulb had the same effect! Dr. McGee concluded that it was just the physical blocking of the avocado pit that prevented of oxidation.

 

 

More there: http://thescienceofcooking.tumblr.com/post/4637524324 

 

.

Very true. I put half an avocado into a bag and vacuumed sealed it and toss in the fridge. Over a week went by with no sign of browning

You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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post #18 of 18

So this is an easy extra step that you can take to help slow down the browning process.  At my restaurant we go through avocados pretty quickly for use in a salad.  One of the sous chefs found (i think from TK) that if you ever so slightly cook the avocados it kills the enzyme that causes browning. Similar to artichokes.  We circulate them in a water bath at 40 celcius (about 104 fahrenheit) for 20 minutes.  Most households have water from the tap that is this hot.  Get your avo's in a vessel, turn the tap on to a steady stream and let them go for 20.  Or you can bring a pot up to about 110, drop in your cold avocados and then turn the heat off.  Whichever way you use, I bet you'll find a difference.  Then all you have to do is make sure its wrapped well enough not to spill in your car :)

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