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Eating in private vs. public - Page 3

post #61 of 75

oh lord no kk...not at all!....i was talking about nancy mitchell on ordo's dining etiquette video...you did watch it didn't you? i just dubbed her miss manners cuz it seemed to fit......

so sorry that you even thought anything other....ain't my stylewink.gif

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #62 of 75

Miss KK, I think Joey was referring to the gal in that etiquette video, not you I'm sure!

all of us here are goddesses!  So I guess that means that it doesn't matter how eat sit at the table, how we eat our food that we are all so passionate about...

because we're all goddesses!

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply
post #63 of 75
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

oh lord no kk...not at all!....i was talking about nancy mitchell on ordo's dining etiquette video...you did watch it didn't you? i just dubbed her miss manners cuz it seemed to fit......

so sorry that you even thought anything other....ain't my stylewink.gif

joey

 

No problem, I did think that everyone might get a bad impression of me when numerous posts told me to chill out but I'm really not that bad.  After psychoanalyzing myself I've realized that I have to dislike someone already for them to annoy me at the dinner table to that extent.

 

I wonder how we'd all get along at a real dinner table.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #64 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

 

I wonder how we'd all get along at a real dinner table.

 

 

I'm pretty sure that we're all  more mannered than we're willing to accept  in the forum.
That's before drinking... After drinking, not sure, but who cares?
post #65 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

 

I wonder how we'd all get along at a real dinner table.

ooh kk, what a fabulously fun idea....let's all plan a virtual dinner party!!! everyone's invited, everyone brings something...appetizers,bar, dinner, dessert, wine....

one thing for sure.....ordo, you're the bartender! or perhaps a moving course party...a different course at a different house....hmmm, anyone game?

what would we talk about?       EVERYTHING!!!!!

joey

 

welcome to autumn everyone...hope it's fabulous where you live.  it is here...

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #66 of 75

isn't that an interesting thought... how would we behave at the table?  I know for me, I'd have a hard time finishing my plate in a timely manner mainly becasue I'd be talking too much...  Joey, I like the progressive dinner party idea! I'm all in!

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply
post #67 of 75

A virtual party? Not sure. I'm so bad using chopsticks it would be embarrassing:

 

post #68 of 75

When I'm out with my girl friends, we yak so much we hardly even eat.  I noticed recently we left the whole basket of bread untouched, which would NEVER happen if I were out with a man or another family member.  

 

 I don't really avoid most things, except drippy stuff if I'm wearing something that I think will be irreparably harmed.   But I've certainly been embarrased before trying to deal with something.   Like Calamari in Sausalito one day.  It was just like eating rubber bands, and I didn't know what to do with them.   Looking back, I should have sent them back.   I also got this HUGE taco one day, local Mexican restaurant.  I couldn't quite figure out how to attack it so that I wasn't wearing most of it.  Finally went for the knife and fork.   And we have an outstanding local Deli, but they pack their sandwiches with WAY too much meat.  I cannot eat all that.  so I buy a package of egg buns from their excellent bakery, slit the meat in half and take it home and have a sandwich (or two) later.  I feel kind of conspicuous de-constructing the sandwich and asking for a container for what I take off of it..

post #69 of 75

sometimes when faced with eating sushi rolls in public i opt for a knife and fork which is not how they are intended to be eaten for sure.  i find sometimes they are too big for one bite and putting the whole thing in my mouth at once would look and feel ghoulish and very, very unattractive...then with the whole thing in your mouth, how do you chew or talk or swallow or drink? unless i know the place and how they make them, sadly i just don't order them out anymore.....how do you sushi?

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #70 of 75

I guess it is the same principle as what my father used to say when we entertained, "If you don't have leftovers, you didn't have enough."   But being from the USA, I have zero problem with people cleaning their plate, and then saying "no thank you" to offers of more.  I figure they know when/if they are full and who am I to question it?  In fact, even though I'm sure it is a time-honored custom, I think it is a bit arrogant to inspect people's plates.  I respect them enough to assume they know what they want.  But if I were in Italy (and I've heard about this custom before) I'd leave a little something.  But here in the US, I think it is up to foreigners to learn and accept our customs.   

 

Too weird about the Japanese thinking that pushing the calamari off the serving platter was rude.   How were they taking theirs?  With tongs one at a time?   

 

Other countries do have different customs, and I suppose we look like pigs to some foreigners.  I remember being in college and offended at the way the Norwegians ate.  I mean, they practically lined their mouths up with the edge of the plate and started shoveling .   So I suppose we Americans look that to other people.

post #71 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

sometimes when faced with eating sushi rolls in public i opt for a knife and fork which is not how they are intended to be eaten for sure.  i find sometimes they are too big for one bite and putting the whole thing in my mouth at once would look and feel ghoulish and very, very unattractive...then with the whole thing in your mouth, how do you chew or talk or swallow or drink? unless i know the place and how they make them, sadly i just don't order them out anymore.....how do you sushi?

joey

 

Sushi etiquette 101 says that you are to eat in one bite, it's rude not too. I feel you on this though, as some nigiri I feel STUFFED trying to manage in one bite. . . if you can't do it in one bite, don't put the left over bite on your plate either, just hold it in your chopsticks and finish once you have swallowed the first bite. Eating with a knife and fork is often an insult, as it sends the message the fish is too tough, or the roll is prepared poorly.

 

Also, pick up sushi pieces with the thick(butt end) of the sticks, and eat with the tips.

 

Don't add soy or wasabi, or ginger to the pieces as it's an insult to the Itamae. Use the ginger to cleanse the palate between bites. And if you do soy, dip fish side down. . . and I have heard that a LOT of sushi chefs get pissed to see people mix soy and wasabi, and it's a Westernized" thing.

 

There are like a million and six subtleties with Sushi. . .best to just enjoy it, and try not to over think it, unless you are in one of those $300 a head type places, and everything is ALL about the experience, the fish, and the Itamae is your guide for the evening.

~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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post #72 of 75

Oh my goodness! I break every sushi rule there is. And I still feel like it's something I should be eating in private. With my fingers. I have such a hard time biting something in half that I'm trying to hold onto with chopsticks and I can never manage it in a single bite. 

post #73 of 75
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoTerry View Post

Oh my goodness! I break every sushi rule there is. And I still feel like it's something I should be eating in private. With my fingers. I have such a hard time biting something in half that I'm trying to hold onto with chopsticks and I can never manage it in a single bite. 

 

Don't worry, I'd say about half of my friends are Japanese and they assure me that eating sushi with your hands is perfectly acceptable and many Japanese eat it like that themselves.  I heard it first hand so go on and eat it with your fingers! Just don't eat it with a fork and knife like Joey, that is indeed not good.  But I totally know what you mean about it being too big, I always eat each piece half at a time which can get awkward if the roll falls apart or the seaweed is too tough.   

 

I think the crazy rules of sushi are a lot more relaxed now.  I eat sushi at least once a week, I don't feel uncomfortable or out of place doing it my way, with lots of wasabi in my soy sauce.  And I know you're supposed to dip fish side down but I like to get the rice in there to sop up all the soy.  I've never been kicked out.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #74 of 75

My grandfather once said to me: "it is not shame to eat." He was poor and he knows it, when you're hungry is not important what you eat, where you eat or with whom you eat.
 

post #75 of 75

If you like a different sauce what's the problem? I think a lot of these "rules", like with sushi, are more questions of snobbery rather than good manners.  Good manners are meant not to offend, while behind snobbisms is the very INTENTION to offend .  Like the no cheese on fish pasta "rule" or the no red wine with fish "rule". They're intended to make people feel uncomfortable and "wrong".   Why would anyone take offense what sauce you put on it?  As long as you don't stuff five in your mouth at once letting rice and raw fish dribble all over the table and your shirt!  Or if there are four pieces of it for four people and you take three of them.    But if i make a wonderful dish and someone wants to put ketchup on it, at most that's their loss, not mine. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
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