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adding spice to tempered chocolate

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hi all, I have been reading this forum for weeks and finally decided to sign up for an account to get all my doubts answered.

 

I am looking to add some favoring to my tempered chocolate by using infusing method. However some questions in regards to this,

 

1) to infused butter for used in tempered chocolate, should i use only cocoa butter? or can i use unsalted butter? So far, i have done only with cocoa butter. am curious if an unsalted butter works the same way inside tempered chocolate?

 

2) i am looking to do up a chili chocolate bar. is there any other methods to achieve that? i have tried many ways such as infusing chocolate and straining the chili out, but find that this way create a lot of wasted chocolates. I have also tried adding chili powder inside, but it doesnt seem to melt together with the chocolate.

 

Am hoping that anyone with such experiences could share some tips with me.

 

Thanks.

 

Chocolate Girl from Asia.

post #2 of 7

For the butter, have you considered simply adding chunks of softened butter to the tempered chocolate?

It works. Unsalted for me.

Second...try pureeing fresh chili's until quite ground up, then placing this mixture in a strainer. Allow gravity to strain the liquid and use this to add to your tempered chocolate.

post #3 of 7

What do you want to do with the chocolate?

 

If you are using  dairy butter, you have to remember that it

 

1) has  a significantly lower melting point than cocoa butter

and

2) Contains about 18% water

 

The "chocolate" with incorporated dairy butter will not set hard like tempered couverture.

 

You can grind the chilli very fine in  a spice mill or electric coffee grinder and mix this powder in the couverture, which is what I do with my chocolate.

 

Hope this helps

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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

For the butter, have you considered simply adding chunks of softened butter to the tempered chocolate?

It works. Unsalted for me.

Second...try pureeing fresh chili's until quite ground up, then placing this mixture in a strainer. Allow gravity to strain the liquid and use this to add to your tempered chocolate.


Thanks for that. I have tried grounding fresh chili padi (chili padi is a real common food spice in Asia) however, it seize my chocolate within seconds of adding it in.

 

As for the butter, do you use dairy?

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

What do you want to do with the chocolate?

 

If you are using  dairy butter, you have to remember that it

 

1) has  a significantly lower melting point than cocoa butter

and

2) Contains about 18% water

 

The "chocolate" with incorporated dairy butter will not set hard like tempered couverture.

 

You can grind the chilli very fine in  a spice mill or electric coffee grinder and mix this powder in the couverture, which is what I do with my chocolate.

 

Hope this helps

 

I am looking to create a spicy chocolate bar. Would like consumer to taste the spiciness with just one bite. And not the after-effect spiciness which I have been achieving all these while.

 

Two simple question,

1) If i add in more cocoa butter to tempered converture, will it cause the chocolate to be more buttery. Personally I felt that my chocolate texture is different in the mouth after I have added my infused cocoa butter into it.

 

2) in regards to grinding.. how find is considered fine? i bought grounded chili powder off e shelve, and it doesnt mix well with the converture.

 

Sorry for the many questions but would greatly appreciate all advice. :)

post #6 of 7

Yes, adding in more cocoa butter will make the chocolate melt much faster in your mouth.

 

Grind as fine as you can, I like to use a cheap electric coffee grinder.  Scoop some melted chocolate into a bowl and stir in the chilli, mix as well as you can.  Then strain the whole thing back into the pot of tempered couverture.  I find it helps to let the chocolate sit for a day or two with the spices before pouring into molds.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #7 of 7
What recipe did you end up using for your chocolate?
I am desperate for a good chilli chocolate bar recipe as I am in yr12 (australia) doing my hsc ...finishing school, this is very important and my teacher will be tasting it. so far, i am UNSATISFIED!
i am making a theoretical cadbury line extension product to rival Lint's excellence chilli chocolate bar

Please, any hints or tips ?
It has got to be really good! And I am not a bad cook so ill be able to whisk up anything any professional or knowledgeable person has to offer.
Very grateful.

Also, thanks for this post smile.gif
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