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A Nice Jewish Boy Needs Help With His Brisket

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone. I'm trying to impress my Jewish mother who thinks she can make the only brisket that is worthy of eating. I have a great recipe (I made one last year and it was surprisingly impressive), unfortunately she wasn't here to witness it.

So here's my question. The recipe that I am using says cook it at 350 degrees for 3- 3.5 hours, for a 5 pound brisket...but here's the catch. I wasn't able to get a 5 pound brisket and have two 3.5 pound briskets (which are marinating in the same roasting pan). I am planning on cooking them together.
So how do I figure out how long to cook them for?

I'm stumped, my briskets are each less than what the recipe calls for, but are gross more...please help me!

post #2 of 15

At the 3 hour mark place a skewer in center of brisket. If it comes out easy it is done ,if you have to tug at it is is not. Keep in mind after you take it out, it will cook for at least 15 minutes more. If overcooked it will be stringy and fall apart and you do not want this. Make some Latkas with it.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #3 of 15

Your original recipe called for @ 39 min/lb (3.25hrs) so at 3.5 lbs ea. that should be 2.3 hrs roughly.  I would check them like Ed says at the 2 hr mark and eye on them.  Don't forget to temper the meat - they should be room temp when you put them in the oven. 

 

Also keep in mind that no matter how good they turn out they will never be as good as your mothers.  That's life  lol.gif

post #4 of 15

For most home cooks, using most home stoves, in typical quantities -- which includes YOU, yours, and yours -- time meat by the weight of the individual roast, not the total weight. 

 

Thus, you're timing for 3.5#.  However, make sure the meat is at room temp and your oven is THOROUGHLY preheated before putting the meat in. 

 

Your old recipes called for approximately 35 to 45 min/lb.  For a 3.5 lb roast:

  • 35 min/lb is around 2 hours;
  • 40 min/lb is around 2 hours and 20 minutes (h/t Mike); and
  • 45 min/lb is around (wait for it) 2 hours and 40 minutes. 

 

Use a thermometer.  The meat's internal temp should be between 190 and 195F.  If you don't have one, buy one.  An inexpensive "instant read" is fine.  If you want to keep an electronic probe in one of the roasts during the entire cook -- better still.

 

Even though your roasts will almost certainly cook at the 40 min/lb rate, use 3 hours (45 min/lb plus 20 minute rest) to figure serving time (and don't forget the time it takes to temp the roasts, preheat the oven; not to mention allowing time at the end to defat the juices for gravy, and slice and plate the meat).  Brisket takes a long time to rest.  When you remove the roasts from the oven, keep them tightly covered and you can rest for up to an hour without the meat getting too cold. 

 

Do nott attempt to slice the brisket until it's well rested.

 

Brisket does not need to be "piping hot" at service. 

 

You can use your knife to correct for minor imperfections in the cooking time.  If the meat is a bit overcooked and wants to fall apart, slice thick.  If the meat is a bit tough, slice very thin. 

 

Always slice brisket across the grain.

 

Latke, not latka.  Latka one of Andy Kaufman's characters on Taxi

 

Otherwise, Ed was right.

 

A bi gezunt and shenah tovah.

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 9/18/12 at 2:49pm
post #5 of 15

For those that don't know Latke s  are potato pancakes.    (pot roast ,brisket, sauerbraten and Bee a la Mode are cooked almost same times)  Pot roast, sauerbraten is usually Bottom Round or Chuck, Shoulder  Most are Browned on top of stove then finished in oven in liquid, herbs and mirepoix are added.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #6 of 15

Agreeing with all the above I would think cooking at 300 would render a better brisket, assuming they are flats there is not a lot of fat (marbling) in there. 

post #7 of 15

I was thinking the same thing - 350 seems high for some reason.  300 - 325 would be my temp choice and adjust cooking time accordingly. 

post #8 of 15

Oven is not automatic and can be turned down manualy  towards end if need be.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #9 of 15

350F might seem high if you're used to cooking brisket outside in a smoker.  I run my smoker at around 270F - 285F for brisket; roast brisket indoors at 300F or 325F; and  cook gedempte fleisch (braised brisket) at 325F.  My feeling is that the lower temperatures allow the meat to "cook past well done and into tender" by better converting the connective tissue proteins.

 

But... BUT... BUT...

 

The OP didn't ask for a recipe, he asked a question about how to convert times for a recipe he's already used successfully.  I tried to answer his question and provide coherent instructions for slightly refining his method.

 

FWIW, a so called "high and fast" 350F  is used by a number of barbecue stalwarts including Ray Lampe and Myron Mixon. 

 

Outdoors or in, I don't think it's a good idea to lower the heat towards the end of the cook.  Sometimes I'll raise my smoker's temp to 300F if I notice the meat stalling.   

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 9/18/12 at 3:02pm
post #10 of 15

You are talking a smoker I am talking an oven. Traditional Jewish style brisket or Deli Brisket is not smoked, not that smoked is not good but it is not Jewish style.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #11 of 15

Posted by chefedb View Post

You are talking a smoker I am talking an oven. Traditional Jewish style brisket or Deli Brisket is not smoked, not that smoked is not good but it is not Jewish style.


Oy Ed.  Read all the words in the post.  I wrote about indoor roasting and indoor braising (gedempte fleisch) as well as outdoor smoking and mentioned the different temperature treatments.

 

I know you worked in a kosher restaurant and the news will come as a surprise.  You shouldn't plotz.  But -- go figure -- people who were merely raised in Jewish families and  taught to cook by their mothers and grandmothers actually know something about preparing Jewish food too. 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 9/19/12 at 7:44am
post #12 of 15

Original post says" kid is trying to impress his Jewish Mother." I never heard of impressing a Jewish mother with smoked brisket maybe you have. He never even asked about smoking. Because you like smoking does not mean whole world does. Plus I was married to a nice Jewish girl for many years, and although we were married and I am not of the Jewish Faith, she was relegious as were her parents. My daughter was brought up Jewish Her parents  were not to thrilled when we got married but I didn't marry them and thats par for the course.Also I never worked in a Kosher restaurant.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #13 of 15

Oy.

 

So if all this tummeling didn't scare the boychick off, I'd like to know how his brisket turned out? I hope his mammele did the right thing and ate every batampte (tasty) bite! licklips.gif

 

Shanah Tovah U'metukah! A good and sweet year!

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post #14 of 15

I've read all the posts and noticed that there was one tip missing.  I was taught to cook it at least the day before. Some of my friends even cook it and freeze it a few weeks before needed. I just do it up to three days before. Cool and place the gravy (whatever you braised it in) and the whole cooked brisket in a 11 x 13 Pyrex dish. Refrigerate overnight.The next day, skim off the cold fat and slice the brisket, put back in the gravy, cover w/ foil, and reheat. Your brisket will be tasty and tender. Enjoy!!

post #15 of 15

Something I've been fooling with for a year or so.  Watching Mixon cooking at 350 gave me an idea.

 

Right now, I preheat the smoker to 250.  Add the briskets (12ups) and set the temperature to 200.  Then, timing after pit hits 200:

 

One hour at 200

One hour at 225

Two hours at 250

Then finish cooking at 325 'til done.  Works out better for me than cooking hot all the way from start to finish.  I pull the meat off the smoker between 190 and 200.  Usually takes around 7-8 hours to cook.  I don't trim at all.

 

It's working pretty good, but still playing with it.

 

Any opinions or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.  I've been doing this stuff at the restaurant for over twenty years and have yet to be satisfied completely with my results. 

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