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whole egg or egg yolk?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I bake a lot and make my own short pastry, sweet and savoury.  I love new recipes and try everything I like at least once, if I'm successful I make pastries and pies over and over. That is why I'm surprised that I have never thought about the difference between using whole egg in a pastry against just an egg yolk. Recently I made a Tarte au Citroen the recipe called for just an egg yolk in the pastry, but a Key lime pie I made called for a whole egg in the pastry.  Are there any chefs out there who can explain the science of using one against the other?

post #2 of 8

Easiest way to think of eggs, for pastry at least, are 'whites=structure and strength' and 'yolks=richness and tenderness'. 

 

Egg whites are almost entirely protein, and as a result will lend strength, a certain forgiveness in mishandling the pastry, a bit of lift in the oven, and some crispiness - too much though, and it can make pastry tough (think angelfood cake). 

 

Egg yolks will make everything richer and tender - they are mostly fat and protein, and will lend your pastry some of that 'melt-in-your-mouth' texture. However, yolks can make the pastry harder to work with, and in crusts it might not be strong enough to hold up to heartier fillings.

 

A whole egg has a nice combination of the two - tender AND strong, which is a good balance for every-day work.  Play with ratios between white vs yolk to find YOUR happy balance.  Eggs also work the same way in cookies, cakes, and bread doughs, for future reference.

 

'Hope that helps!


Edited by CowtownBrewster - 9/22/12 at 4:44pm
post #3 of 8

Cowtown  == Good answer

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

It goes to show you're never too old to learn, I'm 66.  Thanks for that, it helps a huge amount.

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

Cowtown  == Good answer

+1

post #6 of 8

Barb your a baby, I am 70

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #7 of 8

Best answer,chef.gifrollsmile.gif  and he is a beverage expert,  not pastry chef (based on titile)..  I like that.  Sounds like he is not a health food fanatic,  otherwise he will give an answer that would not make sense.licklips.gifdrinkbeer.gif

 

Good to know some people are more into GREAT creations and not for "health care"  purposes..  I do not create what I would not eat. bounce.gif 

post #8 of 8

chefedb, Barb, Kippers, glad I could help, and thanks for the commendation!

 

Prettycake; for the record, it's 'she' is a beverage expert wink.gif, and brewer (ie. beer) to be more precise.  I've dabbled on and off as pastry chef and-or baker for several years, so I take a tenuous prerogative to post in the pros' side of things.

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