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California now allows home baked goods to be sold, :)

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I am excited about this.  Governor Jerry Brown signed it last friday allowing home bakers to sell what they can bake at home.  BUT,  not everything though.  As long as it has NO meat or some specific dairy product.  I have no problem with this..  I only do meat for home consumption,  I am a pastry person.  Cakes and things like that...  But I still need a permit,  which I am happy to oblige.  Its about time.  bounce.gifbiggrin.gif

post #2 of 10

Read the AB 1616 bill CAREFULLY! 

http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201120120AB1616
 

Remember, it was written by the California legislature crazy.gif

 

Only non-PHF can be handled, see the list in the bill...

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Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
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post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
post #4 of 10

PHF = Potentially Hazardous Food, Health Department speak for stuff to worry about.
 

Chef,
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post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Oh yeah !  I saw that..  Are you trying to discourage me ?  smile.gif biggrin.gif  what I will be selling will be much lower price since I have no overhead expenses..  I know creams and meats are not allowed.  I have been baking for 19 years.  NOT a single person got sick on me.....  yet !!  bounce.gif Did  U read the link/News I attached above ?  Not sure if this is bad news to some Bakeries or pastry shops or restaurants.. I'm sure it was not signed by the Governor for no reason or made too difficult for home bakers to deal or comply with.

post #6 of 10

I noticed the list of Non PHF  in the legislation doesn't include "cakes"; and that makes me curious if that's the sort of thing that will be up to the local BoH.  The omission is significant, I think because if each BoH will be approving the "menu" for a cottage food producer, it leaves a lot up to the discretion of each town.  For example, can you use a ganache filling (cream) or not in anything?  How would they define "buttercream" (such as a meringue-based buttercream which would have dairy, eggs, which are PHF but one made with just shortening and confectioners sugar would not have any PHF in it)?

 

With the gross sales limits imposed by the bill, I don't think bakeries or restaurants are going to be in any trouble.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

I would not be using ganache or whipped cream.  I have already decided the things I'll be making.  I will be researching about it more.  I'm not just gonna jump into it right away.. Thank U

post #8 of 10

what permit exactly do you need to get to be able to sell goods from you home?rolleyes.gif I was wondering because i am looking for a quick little job to make some money. 

post #9 of 10

what permit do you need to sell baked goods from you house?

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokokakes View Post

what permit do you need to sell baked goods from you house?

Well, it depends on where you live within California. For starters:

  • Check with your local health department, generally the County Health & Human Services, no idea what the fee will be but estimate $100-$300
  • Check with your local zoning administration, either county or city planning/zoning, many residential zones prohibit commercial activities
  • Check with your local business licensing authority, you will probably need a home business permit or the equivalent
  • Check with the Board of Equalization to get a resellers permit (sales tax #), this is a requirement!
  • Check with your homeowner's insurance agent, you probably will have to modify your coverage or get a commercial policy add-on
  • You WILL have to obtain a Food Safety Manager's certification (that is NOT a Food Handler's card) from ServSafe, NRFSP, or the equivalent, your local health department will guide you. It is an 8 hour class and a proctored exam that will cost $120-$250.

 

I live in Porterville, Tulare County, California and am Vice Mayor, in case you are wondering how I know the above lol.gif

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