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Creme brûlée with a convention oven

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
As a new pastry chef I have learn and corrected my technique and continue to learning new ways and making my own sublime delicious pastries. Yet I find myself in a dilemma with the creme brûlée on a convection oven. No matter how long or temperature it go not set or I over book it to the point of explosion( yes) all over. My recipe simple as 1 qt cream, 1 vanilla bean, 10 yolks, and 1 cup sugar. At the school as well at home using regular still ovens no problem but working in this hotel they only have electric convection ovens and using the traditional 350*f or 325*f for 30 to 45 min do not do me justice and the creme still too runny and not custard like. Any recommendations or corrections on what can I do to solve this problem? Thank you!....
post #2 of 12

Our convection oven cooks at 25 degrees higher than the temp dial says. Try turning down your temp and cook for a longer time for a slower coagulation so that the top and edges won't overcook before the center is set.

post #3 of 12

The fact that as you say "It's all over"" is not do to an explosion . It is that the fan and forced air is blowing the liquid out of its dishes

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 12

it will set when it is very cold.  I put mine in the fridge for hours b4 we eat it..   It is one of those where it has to get very cold and chilled b4 it sets...

post #5 of 12

Prettycake he can't get anything cold if there is nothing left in the ramiken or dish.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #6 of 12

Have you tried covering the pan with foil?  I usually always bake my brulees in a covered water bath.  My assistant bakes brulee without a cover and in a convection oven at 300.  The oven he prefers has the option of turning the fan on or off.  I believe he uses the fan at the beginning and then turns it off to finish.  If the fan is causing an explosion, a cover might be the option.

post #7 of 12

I always cover my baked custards, altho do have to uncover after it sets since condensation from water bath keeps it too wet.

Along the lines of covering water for pasta, just moves things along a bit faster.

Lauren has a point, tho.

Need to reduce the temp as convection's main claim to fame is faster bake time.

post #8 of 12

Convention Oven + a Water Bath / Bain Marie ?

 

The water bath / bain marie is not needed because the even circulation of air insulates the custard from the direct heat.

 

The fan is causing the problem, as Ed said,  " forced air is blowing the liquid out". 

 

I have both ovens here and this is the first time I hear about this type of problem with Crème Brûlée

 

We agree that convect cooks food more quickly, but it can also thoroughly cook food at lower temperatures.

 

The average time saved when cooking with convect is about 20 % of the food's normal cooking time....IMHO, lower the temp and cook for longer. I suggest a small trial run to see what this gives you.

 

Petals.


Edited by petalsandcoco - 9/27/12 at 9:37am

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #9 of 12
I have always serran wrapped then tin foiled my hotel pan to keep it air tight also. My recipe is different. You can use try mine if you like. Has always worked for me.

2L 35 percent
16 egg yok
3 vin beans
4C sugar

3O minutes if mix is hot at 325 or 45 minutes at 325 if mix is chilled. Ramikin size are 2oz or 4oz add another 5 minutes if you choose 4oz.
Let set for 3 hours in the fridge after cooking.

I hope this helps.
post #10 of 12

From the Brulee' King...I use 12-15 yolks to 2 qt H.cream, 2 cp sugar, vanilla and liquor flavor of choice and always water bath with plastic wrap and tight foil. 325 for 45 min is good to go. Gelatinous when done with a nice jiggle. Uncover counter top cool on rack and than in cooler. Rapid cool will crack tops. Keep temperature away from TDZ. Fan or no fan cover for a nice smooth top w no skin, discolor or cracking. I use baker rack in the water bath pan during baking as well sometimes.  Always use Turbinado sugar or Sugar in the Raw to finish off the top just before serving. Brown and hold for quick service later robs your clientele of a fire show and is just nasty.   

post #11 of 12

Well let me toss in the way I do it as it seems lime i do it differently than alll the other posts so far.  Basic reciepe is for me,  1 ltr. of cream 40%  1 fresh vanilla bean, split and scraped, add to cream. 100gr regular sugar, add to cream, warm cream,sugar, vanilla to about 65C.  10 fresh egg yokes in a seperate bowl wisked, temper cream to egg and bring back to 65C..  I split this into 12 portions. Place ramikins onto a sheet pan and cover tightly with plastic.  Into a 100C convection over( 212F) cook until you have just a bit of jiggle in the middle and remove from oven,  let cool covered for 15 min the cool to room temp uncovered. The cook time varies depending on the depth of ramikin you use.  I serve my cream brulee unchilled and topped with raw sugar doubble burnt  eg sugar, burn, more sugar, burn again. We make enough brulees to service about 3/4  of our expected patrons every night and  give the staff any left over at the end of service, thus  fresh  everyday.

post #12 of 12

I've had to change the way I bake brulees every time I've gone into a different kitchen or used a different oven. In one, I found if I covered with foil or plastic wrap then vented by making several slits to let the accumulated steam escape it worked fine. Not so much in a different oven. It's trial and error a lot of the time, but temp is the key.

 

And since the ramekins are so short, I found that if I put side towels on the bottom of the hotel pan and soaked them in water I didn't have to worry about water sloshing into the custards when we took them out. My very tall assistant at the time had a habit of putting the trays on the higher racks in the big ovens. I'm not as tall and had trouble keeping them even when I pulled them out. It worked very well and kept the ramekins from sliding around, too.

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