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How to get the roast chicken spiced?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

Hi,

 

I hope you can help me with one frustrating cooking attempt of mine - get the roast chicken with the flavor, spices and salt I have rubbed it. I never get the chicken meat so good as the preparation I have done with the spices and even marinate. Last time I had the salt crushed with rosemary, thyme and chilli. I used that to season the butter and then rubbed that in the whole chicken. But, in despite of that effort, the skin was good but "inside" the spices didn´t achieve. The chicken is always well roasted and cooked but never tasty enough.

How do you do??

 

Thanks!!

 

Sirlene

Sir
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post #2 of 27

The skin is not particularly permeable to flavor. Rub the spices under the skin and inside the cavity works better.

post #3 of 27

^^What phatch said^^  I like to rub a mixture of garlic, cayenne, thyme and butter under the skin. Be gentle when separating the membrane from the flesh :)

post #4 of 27

also stuff but not overstuff the cavity with orange and onion wedges, whole garlic cloves and dry vermouth. a sprig of fresh herb is nice if you have it..... i like rosemary or thyme.  when you rub the spices/garlic/butter etc. under the skin, rub it under ALL the skin...breast, thighs and legs.

 

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #5 of 27

If you REALLY want to get flavor into your roast chickens you are going to have to brine them in my humble opinion.

post #6 of 27

Would you mind sharing the recipe for "my humble opinion"? I have never tried that brine! lol.gif

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #7 of 27

I agree, rub the spices under the skin.  Me I don't mind if the skin is super tasty and the meat is kind of bland.  I make up for it with a nice jus.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #8 of 27

I vote for brining as well.  You can spice your brine up to your liking and the flavor will permeate your bird.  For crisp skin you must get the skin dry.  Brine over night, dry over day and it should be good to go.

post #9 of 27

You can also inject part of the spiced (and filtered) brine into the chicken.

Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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post #10 of 27

perhaps the chicken you are using itself is the problem. fresh? frozen? young? old? free range? kosher? organic? 

fresh, young and free range is best...well, kosher is if you can get it. i would buy the best chicken you can afford. the better the bird was raised and fed, the better the taste.... in this case size does matter...a smaller chicken is better. use a roaster for roasting...not a fryer or a stew hen...lastly, a simplier alternative to brining is to just sprinkle kosher salt all over the chicken and refreigerate for a few hours or overnight. it almost does the same thing without all the muss......

 

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #11 of 27

I'm a fan of salting 24 hours in advance. Don't add the salt to a spice mixture or butter. Apply the salt to the chicken in advance. Before you cook the bird, add your spiced butter underneath the skin of the bird, all around in a thin layer.
 

post #12 of 27

Brine them in what?

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #13 of 27

salt water.....or rather salted water......not sea water! rolleyes.gif

 

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #14 of 27
Thread Starter 

Cavity was perfect filled with 1/4 lemon, fresh thyme, rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper. No problem there.

Seasoned butter was also rubbed under the skin, but only above the breast.. I was afraid of damaging it a bit .. That I can improve!! Thanks!!smile.gif

 

THANKS TO YOU ALL!! smile.gif


Edited by SIRLENE - 10/9/12 at 6:50pm
Sir
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post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twyst View Post

If you REALLY want to get flavor into your roast chickens you are going to have to brine them in my humble opinion.

 

What is your brine recipe?? I have tried many even with "cachaça"! smile.gif

Sir
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post #16 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

also stuff but not overstuff the cavity with orange and onion wedges, whole garlic cloves and dry vermouth. a sprig of fresh herb is nice if you have it..... i like rosemary or thyme.  when you rub the spices/garlic/butter etc. under the skin, rub it under ALL the skin...breast, thighs and legs.

 

joey

 

You got me!! I did it only for the breast! biggrin.gif

Sir
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post #17 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeepsouthNYC View Post

I'm a fan of salting 24 hours in advance. Don't add the salt to a spice mixture or butter. Apply the salt to the chicken in advance. Before you cook the bird, add your spiced butter underneath the skin of the bird, all around in a thin layer.
 

 

I must try that! Thanks!

Sir
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post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

perhaps the chicken you are using itself is the problem. fresh? frozen? young? old? free range? kosher? organic? 

fresh, young and free range is best...well, kosher is if you can get it. i would buy the best chicken you can afford. the better the bird was raised and fed, the better the taste.... in this case size does matter...a smaller chicken is better. use a roaster for roasting...not a fryer or a stew hen...lastly, a simplier alternative to brining is to just sprinkle kosher salt all over the chicken and refreigerate for a few hours or overnight. it almost does the same thing without all the muss......

 

joey

Free range, frozen. Interesting this alternative of sprinkling the salt in advance. Seems to be my next attempt! Thanks!!

Sir
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post #19 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post

You can also inject part of the spiced (and filtered) brine into the chicken.

 

Another one who got me!!  biggrin.gif

I did a mess once using my brand new " german injection apparat" because I did not filtered my brine! But the result was better than without it, I agree.

Thanks!!

Sir
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Sir
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post #20 of 27

One thing I've done for years is to carefully seperate the skin from the flesh, then stuff butter under the skin and massage it around, to coat the flesh as evenly as possible.  Thick keeps the chicken moist during cooking.  You can add herbs and spices to the butter before applying, to get a flavoured end product.  However, the flavour is usually imparted if you stuff the cavity with a herb blend of stuffing.  The way I make it is bread soaked with water, chopped onion, a herb mix and any spices required.  I also add a bit of butter for moisture while cooking.  Mix it all together, squeeze to remove water, then stuff chicken.

post #21 of 27

commercially we do not stuff for sanitation reasons but I do season and butter undr skin myself as well as putting parsley sprigs and lemon essence in cavity.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #22 of 27

Joey I used to buy the whole organic free range chickens the very day they were dressed out and still I could get almost no flavor, even putting the whole herb garden under the skin, unless I brined.   I happened to mention this to the farmer where I was buying and they were very insulted, never returned my calls again (I had to place an order and they called when they were ready to do the "deed").     The house would smell so good as it was roasting and then tasted so bland on the plate.   When I saw an Alton Brown show about brining, I was so grateful.  Suddenly I could make really good herbed roasted chicken too.

 

I still buy free range organic when I can, but I also buy frozen and still have to brine them all if I want flavor.

post #23 of 27

hey indygal,

salting the bird and refrigerating it uncovered helps to dry out the skin so it will crisp up when roasting...it is not to replace brining which goes deeper...it is only the 'fast and dirty' way...a shortcut if you will..... i don't know if you can have organic free range chickens since free range means they range and eat free, but are not fed hormones or antibiotics etc.... i'm not sure but i think organic infers that the birds eat only organic feed...don't know how that can be controlled if the chickens are free ranging...all i know is that organic chicken tastes like crap...i don't care what you do to it!...(of course, as always, this is only my opinion) wink.gif

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #24 of 27

Hi Joey,

 

I'm not too sure of nomeclature either, but I've seen the operation.  

 

They have huge chicken wire "kennel" things that they move every day.   Chickens are free to move around and eat naturally growing grasses, seeds, etc, in addition to locally grown pesticide & hormone free feed, so there isn't anything that could be considered non-organic, or am I definiing it differently than most people do?   They have two English Shepherds who force the chickens to move with the kennel things as the chickens would like to escape underneath it.  So it is more "free range type feed" than truly loose chickens.

 

I brined anywhere from a few hours to all day, I'm afraid.   I put herbs in the brine ant that allowed them to permeated and flavor the meat too.

 

One variety of laying hen they had gave little blue/green eggs, and those were the best poaching eggs I've ever had.  The whites were super firm and looke almost too pretty to eat!  But  they were small.

 

I still salt the grocery chickens before roasting too.   

post #25 of 27

hey indygal, 

as a funny aside to all this, i once had a dog in the islands that was accused of eating all the neighborhood chickens...i went to battle for this dog, but it became very hard when he(mutley) had chicken feathers and blood dripping from his mouth!!!!  i still defended him for some reason......yeah the blue eggs are beautiful to cook...i don't eat them, but when i cooked on the arizona ranch the past few winters and the fresh eggs were pulled every morning still warm, the blue ones were always coveted and they cooked up so purdy!....

 

joey

as for organic vs. free range vs. free range organic if there is such a thing,i thought i knew but now my thinking is that's it's all just another hype or scam or something just totally not honest...it's like when i found out about kfc chickens and how they are raised...OMG...god, don't get me started...what about all the turkeys for thanksgiving...raised so fat breasted that they need a walker...oh geez...guess the bottom line is...do you feel better eating what you are eating? and do you feel better better about not endorsing 'industrial farming/ agriculture' and supporrting your local farmer? sorry indy for the rant....but may the beat go on!...

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

hey indygal, 

as a funny aside to all this, i once had a dog in the islands that was accused of eating all the neighborhood chickens...i went to battle for this dog, but it became very hard when he(mutley) had chicken feathers and blood dripping from his mouth!!!!  i still defended him for some reason......yeah the blue eggs are beautiful to cook...i don't eat them, but when i cooked on the arizona ranch the past few winters and the fresh eggs were pulled every morning still warm, the blue ones were always coveted and they cooked up so purdy!....

 

 

OMG!  Poor chickens.   I understand believing that Fluffy would never do such a thing, but my girl I just had to rehome was a killer.  Squirrels, wild rabbits, possums, and even snatched birds right out of the hair.  TG she never had a chance at any chickens.  But she did attack and kill a grand champion angora rabbit of mine one day.  Viciously attcked her, and even when I got the poor doe out of her mouth, she was still trying for it.  She got a beating over tht one.

 

My brother had to put his own dog to sleep, she was escaping every single enclosure they came up with and going to the neighbor's barn and killing his fancy State Fair winning chickens.    Then she was caught in the barn of another neighbor having pulled the leg off of a (meat) rabbit through a hole underneath.  He shot her himself.   They tried everything, including chaining her to prevent it, but could not stop her.   She was a golden retriever mix, as sweet as anything when she wasn't out killing small animals.


Edited by IndyGal - 10/18/12 at 7:18am
post #27 of 27

The dogs that could get loose used to form packs in the winter and take down deer in the neighborhood I grew up in the foothills of Salt Lake. The deer would come down out of the mountains and eat up people's yards.

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