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Trussing chicken: French method (trussing needle) or simply twining it?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hi all, I've been wondering if the French method of trussing a chicken with needle is better than the conventional method of just tying loops and knots and all.  The chicken which I'm using will have to be poached by the way.  Thanks.smile.gif

post #2 of 11

There's a YouTube video of French Laundry Chef Thomas Keller trussing a chicken with string and nothing else. He makes it look so simple and easy. Check it out.

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks Chefross.  Might be doing away with the needle at practical tomorrow (just assuming it's more complicated that way).  I'm not sure what the chef instructor will think of me using a different technique from one taught at demo. But if it's as effective as trussing with needle then non probleme, i guess.
 

post #4 of 11

I've never used a trussing needle.

 

 

But you should first think about what your instructor really is interested in:  a trussed chicken (any way that works) or a trussed chicken that was trussed his/her way.

post #5 of 11

Pretty sure Chef is trying to make sure his students learn the basics (done in the classical manner).

What if someday you are seeking a position in a five star kitchen and you are asked to truss using a needle?

OOPS?

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

Noted. It's always good to know different techniques.  Found a video demonstrating on how to truss a chicken with needle.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0Qn960YCZ4

post #7 of 11

If he is teaching the needle method there is a reason - even if it is just historic.  But as mentioned it's a good thing to have in your "tool kit".  Say you were going to bone and stuff a chicken - then you might want to sew it up no?

post #8 of 11

You get a tighter, more compact bird using a trussing needle properly.  Whether or not it makes a difference when roasting, braising or poeling a chicken which is not stuffed is a different question.  In my opinion, the differences are slight, primarily cosmetic and not worth the effort. 

 

It makes no difference poaching.  

 

Nevertheless, perform tasks the way you're taught.  

 

BDL 

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post #9 of 11

It is impossible to truss a chicken properly and NOT use a needle.  If you don't know the difference or can't tell the difference then get busy.  There's a difference.

 

I think trussing with a needle is far, far easier. 

post #10 of 11

It boils down to what you have been taught as BDL mentionned. 

Don't most schools teach with a needle ? For those that can do it with knots, why not ?  Why should it matter if the desired result was achieved in the end ?

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Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

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Wine and Cheese
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post #11 of 11

I do it with knots, it's much simpler IMO, no needle to thread, no puncturing the skin, no needle to clean and dry and store etc. Then again it depends on the bird, I think with most smaller chickens you don't need a needle, but maybe for bigger birds or tougher birds, the needle may help. 

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