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glazing cake with ganache

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
last night i made a pound cake and decided to fill. then i decided to make ganache... 1.5 pounds chocolate, 1 pound cream, 2 oz corn syrup.

i then took the cake and put some buttercream icing on it, chilled it and then poured the ganache over it. the cakes that i have seen that were glazed with ganache were so pretty but when i did it, it sucked. i was wondering if anyone had any tips on glazing.

thanks
Chef Isaac... Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com
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Chef Isaac... Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com
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post #2 of 11
What was wrong with it?
post #3 of 11
What kind of chocolate did you use?

Couverture is a good choice for it's ease of handling.
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
it didnt have a nice sliky look to it... like i have seen before.

i just used chocolate chips from the store.
Chef Isaac... Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com
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Chef Isaac... Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com
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post #5 of 11
Choc chips will never look shiny (all that other stuff in them)...use the best chocolate you can. Never made mine with corn syrup. If you add about 2 T. of butter instead it wil be nice and shiny.
post #6 of 11
Isaac,

Couverture works best because of it's high percentage of cocoa butter—from 32 to 39 percent. This extra cocoa butter makes it easier to work with the chocolate in melted form, and it can be used to form a thinner, more delicate shell to enrobe things.

As for the butter instead of the corn syrup, I agree. Some use honey.

Whichever works for you, the basic ingredient for success being the Couverture IMHO.
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #7 of 11
I've seen recipes that include butter, corn syrup, or a combination of both. Mine is just couverture and cream. I take off the cream just before it boils, and pour it into the melted chocolate. Whisk gently (but thoroughly) and strain. Silky everytime.
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
yea.. i will try the straining suggestion. that might work well. might try butter too. you dont replace all the cream with butter do you? just add a little... right?

thanks
Chef Isaac... Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com
Reply
Chef Isaac... Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com
Reply
post #9 of 11
I glazed a cake today using Callebaut chocolate. I've always used chocolate, cream, and honey. Don't strain though. Turns out great.

I used 3/4#chocolate
1 1/4 cup cream
1 oz honey
post #10 of 11
One or two tablespoons butter will do, Isaac.
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #11 of 11
Here's what Thomas Keller has to say about ganache:

«ganache is the perfect example of chocolate's greatness, versatility and simplicity. The fancy French name denotes simply this: equal parts chopped chocolate and hot cream, stirred until they are incorporated into one another.

By itself, the result is perfect in texture and purity of flavor. Use it on ice cream, with cake or with fruit. Furthermore, it is easily flavored. Infuse the cream with citrus zest, vanilla (which enhances the chocolate flavor), ginger or cinnamon, or enhance the final sauce by adding oils such as hazelnut or walnut. Or you can offset the sweetness with the cool acidity of creme fraiche. Cooled and left to set, ganache can be rolled into balls and dusted with cocoa to make chocolate truffles.

(The French Laundry adds corn syrup to the cream for texture, 1/12 of the basic ganache recipe by weight.)

Add chopped nuts or raisins to give those truffles another dimension.

Beat room temperature butter into ganache and you have a beautiful glaze for cakes.

Fold in whipped egg whites and you have a delicate mousse.

Alter the density by adding more cream and you can whip this ganache into soft peaks.

Add some ganache to a mug of hot milk and you have extraordinary hot chocolate.»
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
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