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Gyuto and Sujihiki

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 

So I'm looking to pick up a couple new knives sometime between now and Christmas.  I am a line cook and work the fish station.  I'm looking at Misono Sweden, Kikuichi, and Konosuke.

 

Suji:

When working on the line during service, I like to keep my board clean and uncluttered, so I want just one knife to keep on the board, and I'm thinking the a suji might be a good choice.  Pretty standard knife work during service like mincing/chiffonade herbs, slicing cooked and raw (sashimi grade) tuna and salmon, etc.  Right now I'm using a chef's knife, but I feel I could and should get something better.  My main choice for this right now is the 270mm Misono Swedish Steel.  It's about $250, which is the max I want to spend on a suji.  I hear this is the best Suji out there (for the price at least), is there truth to this?  What other knives are on par or better than this one?  Also, how prone to chipping is this knife.  I'm not worried about it being abused as no one else uses my knives, but can I use this for breaking down a 15lbs+ salmon without worrying?  If not, I have other knives for the job.

 

Gyuto:

For just about all of my prep work. Max price range is about $200.  I have thick heavy SS german knives now, so I would like a much thinner and lighter (laser?) 240mm carbon knife.  I work morning shift, so I do a lot of prep, and found that those heavy knives can get tiring when doing hours of knife work.  So my choices currently are:

1.  Konosuke White #2

2.  Kikuichi Carbon Elite

3.  Misono Swedish Steel, but it's more than I want to spend

4.  Masamoto Virgin Carbon (at Korin, I think it's the HC?) but i don't think it's the laser i want

So, I am mainly looking between the Konosuke and Kikuichi.  Does anyone know the type of steel used in the Kikuichi?  How do the Konosuke and Kikuichi compare in terms of steel quality, reactivity, ease of sharpening, edge retention, thinness, weight, etc?  I plan on letting a natural patina form, but will I be able to cut tomatoes, onions, and citrus with these knives without any effect to the food?

 

My current knives that I use most often are:

10" Messermeister Meridian Elite sharpened 70/30 (main knife)

10" Forschner chef (for heavier work)

10" Forschner Breaker

9" Carbon Dexter Filet (just got it and so far I like it)- replaced a 9" Nogent Filet that I just could not get a good edge on, very disappointing

150mm Misono 440 Petty (also fairly new, and really like it)

Forscher bread and pairing knives

Henkels Fine(?) steel

1000/4000 stone from Korin, planning on getting a 220 and a finer polishing stone soon

 

Even though most of my knives are SS, I always clean them after use, especially during service I wipe them off after everything I cut, I feel it's just a good habit to have. I sharpen my Messer twice a week, and everything else once a week.

 

I think that's all the necessary info haha.  Thanks!

post #2 of 42

Green Guy, if you use a Suji, you should use a less finesse knife for the fish prep work.

 

I have broken down many whole fish including 10-25 lb salmon (steaking and fileting). Just my opinion but you already have a nice knife for that ... the Forschner Breaking knife ... thin slices will be much nicer with a Suji/slicer type of knife.

 

I may be also on the look out for a Suji, for home use (incl. catering and bbq comps) though and much less expensive than your budget.

post #3 of 42

The Misono Sweden is an excellent yo-suji.  Best is another question.  Best for whom?  Best for what?  There's lots of competition in carbon sujis at the price, including  Masamoto HC, Kikuichi Elite Carbon, Konosuke White #2 to name a few. 

 

A suji is a poor choice for breaking large fish.  You want something (a) which won't chip on bones, and (b) which is quite a bit stiffer.  On the other hand, it's an optimal choice for portioning.

 

The Kikuichi Elite alloy is NKS-52, aka SKS-5 tool steel.

 

On your list of gyuto, only the Konosuke is a laser.  It is also the only yo-gyuto on your list, and as far as I know the White #2 series gyuto are not available with a wa handles.  However, the HD, semi-stainless series is.  

 

Nothing against the Kikuichi, but the Konosuke is a better knife in every other, objective respect.  Although not a laser, the Masamoto HC is also an exceptionally good knife, and far better than the Kikuichi, with a great, Sabatier-like profile.  It and the Konosuke are the class of the field of knives on your list. 

 

T-I's factory edges on the Nogents run the gamut from not very good, to very bad, to horrible, to "Edge?  What edge? I don't got to show you no stinkin' edge."  If you still have the knife you might want to try creating a new edge from scratch.  Reprofile to a flat bevel, 15* on both sides, with a slight 60/40 asymmetry, make sure you deburr thoroughly, and see if that doesn't work for you. 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 10/20/12 at 9:49am
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post #4 of 42
Thread Starter 

I was considering the other suji's you mentioned as well.  At $100 less then the Misono, the Kikuichi seems like a good deal.  Of the four you mentioned, are any considerably better/worse than another, or are they pretty much all on same level?  If the Kikuichi will still take a great edge, then that might be what I am looking for.  It's really only going to be used for a couple hours during service and probably for portioning as well.  Most of my day is spent prepping.

 

For the gyuto, the handle on the Konosuke was putting me off a bit, but everything else about it fit what I wanted.  Are there any other similar knives with a western handle?  Does not have to be a laser I guess, but definitely much lighter and thinner than my messermeister.  Also, how does the HD steel compare to White #2? 

 

And yeah, I typically use my breaking knife for larger fish, but was wondering if maybe a suji could also replace that, but i wasn't sure if it would be to prone to chipping.

post #5 of 42

How does HD compare to White #2? 

  • They're very close.  HD feels like carbon on the stones, very pleasant, very smooth.  Konosukes are so thin that with a good knife and edge geometries play more of a factor than the alloys' potentials for absolute sharpness, which are very close anyway.  I treat all my knives as though they were carbon, so -- for me -- maintenance is about the same except that I don't rub the HDs down with baking soda every time I sharpen.   I have nothing but praise for either alloy. 

 

Is the Kikuichi Carbon Elite "as good" as the other, more expensive sujis? 

  • That's a question I can't answer.  So much depends on your own preferences, how far you let an edge go before sharpening, your sharpening skills, and your maintenance routine.  It's a very good knife, which would work well in a professional environment, but which wouldn't be near the bottom of my personal short list.  Even if I would consider a yo-suji, I'd spend the extra few bucks for a more prestigious alloy.  My advice?  Don't worry about my personal short list, worry about yours.

 

BDL

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post #6 of 42
Quote:
My advice?  Don't worry about my personal short list, worry about yours.

Have to admit I miss your way of wording things crazy.gif I really need to find time to get back here more often.

 

Much as that is good advice I believe there is still something to be learned by the preference of others, and especially in respect to products you don't really know about.

 

It is sort of weird but after you read enough replies from different members you can sort of figure out certain things and in some way put things into a "online" perspective.

 

I remember when I first found this site and was trying to get a handle on what would be a suitable first J knife etc I found a post by a member on one of the brands being considered very helpful as it was from his view from using it everyday at work etc. Not that I intended to have the same use as I had not worked in the business for around 20 years, but adding his input to what I had already from so many others just allowed a better understanding etc.

 

Since I am trying to add a suji myself I am finding the comparisons here helpful as well, and since I may not be able to spend on another Konosuke HD (my preference from my experience with the gyuto I already have) I am really curious how the carbon ones compare, and if there are any true standouts that are priced lower enough to make it a no brainer etc..

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

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"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

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post #7 of 42

There are important things going beyond edge taking and holding properties, geometry and comfort, like aesthetic appeal and "pride of ownership," which go to making a good fit between knife and owner.   I know from my own experiences of seeking advice, that someone rating a bunch of knives 1, 2, 3 makes things more confusing than doing much illumination, because -- after all -- who can you trust?  So many people who give advice want you to use whatever they chose for themselves that after awhile you realize the recommendation is more about them than the knife because they would have liked almost anything they'd bought equally well, so the recommendation becomes meaningless. 

 

For a lot of people -- specifically the type of people who seek "expert" advice in knife and cooking forums -- figuring out which recommendations can and cannot be trusted is impossible.  At this stage of the game, you've figured out that when someone says "my XYZ knife stays sharp enough to shave with for a year with only an occasional trip to my Spyderco Sharpmaker," quotes Alton Brown, or -- well a lot of things -- that's someone to avoid.  But most people haven't figured that out, because they simply don't know enough about knives, knife skills, sharpening, sharpening skills or internet self-proclaimed experts. 

 

I don't care whether you make the same choices I do or even follow my advice about which knife to buy.  The idea is to give you enough information so that you can figure out what's most important to you, what will work best for you in your situation, and avoid an expensive mistake so that you can better enjoy cooking.  It's just perspective. 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 10/27/12 at 10:05am
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post #8 of 42
Thread Starter 

I had a chance to go to NYC today and got to check out some knives at Korin.  I compared mostly the Misono Swedish and Masamoto HC and found that out of those I liked the Misono gyuto, and the Masamoto suji.  I also found a store that carries Kikuichi, but unfortunately did not have the carbon suji's in stock. While I was there I looked at some knives with Japanese style handles.  The Suisin Inox gyuto handle seemed too big/awkward and I think that has turned me off of the Konosuke White #2, assuming the handles are the same.  So, I think I narrowed down the gyuto to the Konosuke HD and Misono Swedish, and the suji to the Masamoto HC and Kikuichi, and possibly the Misono, but the price is a bit high.  Thank you for your input.

post #9 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

There are important things going beyond edge taking and holding properties, geometry and comfort, like aesthetic appeal and "pride of ownership," which go to making a good fit between knife and owner.   I know from my own experiences of seeking advice, that someone rating a bunch of knives 1, 2, 3 makes things more confusing than doing much illumination, because -- after all -- who can you trust?  So many people who give advice want you to use whatever they chose for themselves that after awhile you realize the recommendation is more about them than the knife because they would have liked almost anything they'd bought equally well, so the recommendation becomes meaningless. 

For a lot of people -- specifically the type of people who seek "expert" advice in knife and cooking forums -- figuring out which recommendations can and cannot be trusted is impossible.  At this stage of the game, you've figured out that when someone says "my XYZ knife stays sharp enough to shave with for a year with only an occasional trip to my Spyderco Sharpmaker," quotes Alton Brown, or -- well a lot of things -- that's someone to avoid.  But most people haven't figured that out, because they simply don't know enough about knives, knife skills, sharpening, sharpening skills or internet self-proclaimed experts. 

I don't care whether you make the same choices I do or even follow my advice about which knife to buy.  The idea is to give you enough information so that you can figure out what's most important to you, what will work best for you in your situation, and avoid an expensive mistake so that you can better enjoy cooking.  It's just perspective. 

BDL

I couldn't agree more.

Reading through the BS takes time, but identifying what is BS is time consuming.

I think once anyone figures out how to ID self praise, and fanaticism and can then avoid or question those comments it does make things easier.

Only problem is that some (certainly not many or most) products are actually so good or offer such a value that they can be popular among various users etc and that can make it tough to really know what to believe and what to question.

But hey this is all part of the fun lol.

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

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"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #10 of 42
Thread Starter 

Did Konosuke and Masamoto both raise their prices?  I think I saw a note from CktG about Konosuke prices being raised, but I also noticed that Korin raised their prices on the Masamoto Virgin Carbon, and the 270mm suji is now $280...way more than I would spend on that knife.

post #11 of 42
Just want to add that the misono swedish sujihiki is a great knife!

I have zero complaints.

Cuts very well, very light, and I forced a nice dragon scale patina on the back using toothpicks and a LOT of time drawing the individual scales on there.

Trying to accent the inside of scales with blood to force blue patina inside grey outline.
post #12 of 42
Thread Starter 

Wow, that sounds like an awesome looking patina.  I was actually thinking that I might get the Misono Swedish gyuto, and the suji is between the Misono and Kikuichi carbon, but leaning towards the Kikuichi because it's cheaper, and will be used primarily on the line.  Has anyone used the Kikuichi TKC gyuto?  I've heard it was just a more expensive Carbonext.  Not sure if I still want a "laser" but definitely something on the thin/light side.  Thanks.

post #13 of 42
Thread Starter 

Okay, so Korin has their 15% off sale for December, which brings the Misono suji to $200, so I will probably get that.  I've been looking around a bit more at gyuto's, and now I'm more unsure of what I want.  Right now I am considering:

Misono Sweden $172 (sale at Korin)

Gesshin Ginga White #2 $250

Sakai Yusuke $210 (sale at Cktg)

Konosuke White #2 $238

 

The only knife I have held in my hand is the Misono, and my concern is ordering a knife I have never seen in person.  I like the wa-handles on the traditional japanese knives, but not really the bigger bulkier ones found on some of the gyuto's I've seen (suisin).  I think everyone but the Misono would be "lasers."  What are the pros/cons of a laser?  Like I said before, I'm not too sure if I still want a laser.  How much thinner/lighter are some of these knives compared to the Misono?  Thanks again.

post #14 of 42
Well it seems I'm having a problem replying via android as thought I posted here twice, but for some reason they are not here. Guess it could be a service issue as we have had problems on and off since Hurricane Sandy whooped our butt's here. Oh well hope this one sticks.

First I'm also a fan of the dragon design on the Misono but somehow much as it was a great idea on their part never purchased one yet, but I'm starting my list for a slicer/suji or maybe yanagiba so maybe could be one in my future.

So I'm also very interested in replies concerning this as well.

I am not going to be as long winded as in the previous posts that had problems but basically I find no issue with the laser at all. Sure it is much thinner behind the edge than the non laser gyuto I have but spine thickness is not as exaggerated and though it is more flexible it is not as much a difference as I expected and less of difference than comparing my. Fujiwara to my previous Henckels Pro-S.

When used properly the blade on the Konosuke HD I have is absolutely fine bit also the edge makes it the best cutter I own, and I honestly would sacrifice even more flexibility for the effortless cutting it affords.

My only possible concern is that thinner also seems to promote additional sticking when cutting. Especially potatoes where if your fast they can end up all over the board wink.gif

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #15 of 42

The Misono Sweden is a very nice knife indeed.  It takes and holds a great edge; has a very comfortable handle; a nice profile; and of course there's the dragon -- which makes the knife especially nice for ceremonial occasions at home; and for a pro's carving station and buffet use.  The only knock against the knife I can think of is that it's extremely reactive compared to other high-end yo-sujis.  IMO the Masamoto HC is a slightly better knife overall, and a K-Sabatier or Nogent is its (very different) equal.

 

All hail the Sweden! 

 

However, it's not a laser.  The Misono is a thin knife, but -- at pain of repetition -- it's not a laser.  What's the big deal about lasers?  Thin, thin, thin; and that makes them seem sharper.  To help you understand what I mean let me explain the difference between what I call absolute sharpness and perceived sharpness.  "Absolute sharpness is a measure of how thin at the apex (very sharp edges run between 3/1000" and 1/1000") and how true the edge is.  "Perceived sharpness" is a measure of sharpness in practice; i.e. how sharp does the blade cut, how sharp does the blade feel in the cut, etc. 

 

Everything else being equal, as a product of their thin bodies lasers will give you more perceived sharpness.  The trade off is that they're so thin they flex a lot -- which means you have to keep them square to the cut, square in the cut, and square to the board.  If you torque the knife it will bend and bind, and consequently won't cut straight. 

 

Laser gyuto aren't a great idea for high pressure prep or use on the line, unless you have excellent skills; mostly because time pressure makes for a tight grip, which makes for torquing; which in turn causes binding and unintentional steering; which in turns makes for uneven, non-straight cuts.   But for anyone with solid skills or a home cook who has the luxury of taking the time to get things right and correct them when they first start to go wrong -- not a problem.  That's something of an evolutionary idea in that when lasers first became popular they were recommended for "experts only."  But it seems nearly everyone likes them, so...  We can't all be wrong, can we?  Okay, we can, but...

 

Almost everyone LOVES the Suisun Inox Honyaki wa handle.  It is large, though.  FYI the usual solution to a too large handle is too soften your own grip and stabilize the handle more with your finger tips than by wrapping your fingers all the way around it.  But there are always exceptions and some handles just don't work for some people.  If you don't like the Suisun handle, you don't like it -- and besides there's no particularly good reason to pay Suisun Inox Honyaki prices anymore. 

 

All of the lasers on your list are extremely good.  Considering that you'll be using the knife for years, I suggest forgetting about the relatively small price differences and using more important considerations -- including looks. 

 

I have a Konosuke HD 300mm suji and love it.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 12/1/12 at 8:45am
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post #16 of 42
Thread Starter 

Very helpful replies Lenny and BDL, thanks.  LIke I said before, not being able to actually see these knives in person makes the choice much harder.  BDL, you said what I was thinking about with lasers in a pro setting.  While my knife skills are pretty decent (as the should be for a pro), I don't think I want something with too much flex because of the whole time pressure thing you mentioned, as well as I prep a lot of foods that would definitely cause the knife to flex if not completely square.  It's not something I want to think about when in a rush. The Misono seems to be the best balance, and it did feel great in my hand when I tried it.

 

Also, it's kinda stupid, but I like getting a variety of brands so I was looking to get different suji/gyutos, but it's for my job and I need to be practical and get the best tool for the job.  Maybe in a few months from now I will get one of those nice laser to use at home.

 

I think I am going to be getting the Misono for both, as they both seem to be the best fit for my needs and I know I will be happy with them.

 

So next, I may want to get a new stone.  I assume it's not a great idea to use a steel on these knives, so I would like to get a finer stone to use after every 1 or 2 shifts.  Right now I have a Sun Tiger 220 (just used it for the first time to try and thin out my messer and forschner chefs) and a combo 1000/4000 stone from Korin.  I guessing my next step would be either 6000 or 8000.  I was thinking this 8000 grit: http://www.chefknivestogo.com/na80grsust1c.html  Seems like a good stone to keep at work for quick touch ups.

post #17 of 42
Thread Starter 

So I e-mailed Mark at CktG, and he also suggested a Moritaka suji.  It is a lot harder (64ish) than the others, so it will probably take a very steep/sharp edge and hold it for a long time, but I am concerned that it may be too delicate for a line knife and may chip to easily for it purpose.  Also, is it thicker at the spine than the others?  Any thoughts on this?  I keep flip-flopping, but assuming the Moritaka is too prone to chipping for my needs, I think I will be getting the Misono gyuto, and the Kikuichi suji, so I can have the chance to try some different steels/makers.  Also, is this http://www.chefknivestogo.com/na80grsust1c.html a good stone for maintaining these knives on a daily basis?  Thanks again.

post #18 of 42

Knives:

Moritaka Suji:

Moritakas have a reputation for shoddy QC, especially the grind, and indifferent F&F.   But reputations don't always keep up with reality, and -- to make things a little more confusing -- the knife universe has an emotional split between Mark and Jon and some criticisms of Mark's stock may sound louder than they otherwise would.   So, it's something you should think of as more rumor than fact, but it's something I'd ask Mark about.  Anyway, I don't like them because they're san-mai.  I wouldn't be overly concerned about Moritaka sujis chipping, at least they don't have that reputation and sujis usually don't take the abuse that causes the problem.  But again that's more fodder for your conversation with Mark. 

 

While I love my Kono HD suji dearly, let me throw you a curve ball and suggest that you consider the Misono Sweden as your suji, and not as your gyuto. 

 

Misono vs Kono vs Gesshin vs ???:

You have to decide whether you're going wa or yo, and whether you're going laser or merely thin.  If you want a laser, you won't be getting one with a Misono Sweden.  In the non-laser class the Masamoto HC is a better knife than the Misono, even without the dragon. 

 

I've never used a laser yo-gyuto, but have used all of the brands you've mentioned as wa-gyuto.  The Gesshin and Konosuke are a push.  The Sakai Yusuke has slightly less good F&F, but if you buy from Mark instead of Blueway you overcome the biggest problem which is dealer support.  I think saving $40 for a knife you'll use everyday for a period of years is a false economy and would go with the Gesshin or Konosuke.  But that reflects my values and may not reflect yours. 

 

Stones:

My last polishing stone was a Naniwa SS  8K, which I bought used and wore out after about two years.  There are a lot of very nice things to say about the Naniwa SS 8K and 10K, but the first thing which must be said is that they're both VERY soft and prone to gouging.  Experts only! 

 

When it did wear out, I replaced it with the best, ultra fine polishing stone I've ever used:  The Gesshin 8K.  It's fast, as much about sharp as it is about shine, splash and go, doesn't need much flattening, etc.  In other words, all the usual virtues and in spades.  However, it's extremely expensive and may be out of your price range.  Further, there's some question in my mind whether it makes practical sense to spend that kind of money on a stone even if you can afford it. 

 

The two best, "reasonably" priced stones are the Naniwa Pure White and Kitayama.  The Pure White will give you a better shine and perhaps a little edge [sorry, I can't help myself) in sharpness compared to the Kitayama, the Kitayama will give you a more misty look with a longer wearing edge.  They can be used one after the other -- in either order -- for an ultimate edge, but the pair costs as much as a Gesshin 8K and used in tandem aren't nearly as convenient.

 

The Chosera 10K is another really good stone, but is just about as expensive as the Gesshin 8K and not as good.  Perhaps a bit faster than either the Pure White or Kitayama, but otherwise no better, and twice the price. 

 

You're probably not going to get much actual sharpening by using an ultra-fine polishing stone to "touch up" on a daily basis.  What you will get is fairly effective truing -- in other words it's the equivalent of using a steel,  In fact, a properly used steel would be faster and more convenient for the Misono Sweden or Masamoto HC.  If you want to sharpen daily -- i.e. raise a burr, chase the burr, and deburr -- you're going to want to start with a coarser and faster stone.   I use a Bester 1.2K, and because the jump from the Bester to the old Naniwa 8K was way too much and the jump to the Gesshin is still -- by just a little -- too much, I use a Chosera 3K in between.  

 

If I were putting a new kit together from scratch, I'd forget the Bester and Chosera in favor of a Gesshin 2K.  A good aoto would serve the same purpose as a Gesshin 2K, more cheaply but not as well.  But we're getting into specific sets which is (a) complicated; and (b) not the subject of your question.

 

Hope this helps,

BDL

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post #19 of 42
As long as CKTG has no serious response to the numerous overgrind issues reported with Moritaka, I would stay away from them.
post #20 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benuser View Post

As long as CKTG has no serious response to the numerous overgrind issues reported with Moritaka, I would stay away from them.

 

+1.  There's just no need to take that risk when there are so many other viable options.

 

Dave

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post #21 of 42
Options. I like options lol.

I have not seen any mention of the CN suji or the apparently much different wa handle version (sorry but just forget the name) that is a carbon core etc from JKI.

Not sure if the later would be a laser but thought the CN was, and both are on my long list (in the affordable column lol) for a suji.

Any thoughts on these?

How about others in the lower price range.

Like the OP I like to mix it up when it comes to brand or style so much as I do like the Konosuke HD i would like to try something different (plus the current pricing on the HD is a bit of a deterrent too).

Also much as I am intrigued by carbon the talk of being overly reactive just doesnt sound like fun (sort of why I like the steel on the HD so mucb etc).

Options? smile.gif

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

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"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #22 of 42

The 270mm CN suji is currently on sale for $139 so at that price it's a steal. If I didn't already have a suj in my kit I'd snap that one up while it's in stock.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #23 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckFat View Post

+1.  There's just no need to take that risk when there are so many other viable options.

Dave

That's an attractive price!

I am also not concerned with the edge issues and know if the steel sharpens anything like the HD semi carbon it will be a pleasure to get right smile.gif

I am still in the search mode though as I was thinking maybe another WA handled knife.

Guess in trying to balance out my block which is all YO except for the HD.

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #24 of 42

I saw the WA suj that Koki has but with the sale price on the CN I'm not sure even a WA fan like myself could justify the price difference. That's one of the best deals I've seen recently. I've yet to see any real edge issue on a CN. There's a lot of CN fans over @ KKF.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #25 of 42

Curious which "wa handle" knife you were also looking at?

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #26 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by LennyD View Post

Curious which "wa handle" knife you were also looking at?

 I misread your post and was looking at the WA carbon core that Koki has @ JCK.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #27 of 42
You may have read it right.

Is it the Inazuma ( sp? )

That looks like it could be a contender but I'm not sure that i want to go carbon yet much as I do want to etc, but it is only the core so it may be a good compromise for me.

I have not really read much on reviews and know little more than what is on the site etc but it is wa, has good looks, and would allow me to own my first carbon J knife.

Guess i need more info before i can decide if all that really is above the HD enough to make up for the steel I enjoy so much also being so damn expensive lol.

Then again with that pricing i may instead go with a hd petty as thats about my limit on spending and also almost as much as the gyuto I pickef up last year.

Any thoughts?

Y

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
post #28 of 42
Thread Starter 

So I picked up the Misono Swedish gyuto about a week ago and so far I like it, although I don't think I have sharpened it to its full potential yet, I probably should have let them sharpen it when I got it, but I wasn't 100% sure I was keeping it at the time.  I like the weight and thickness of it.  It's not super light, but probably about half the weight and thickness of my Messermeister, and balanced perfectly.  I was comparing it with the Masamoto, but I picked the Misono because it was a tad lighter, thinner, and I like the profile and shape of the tip better, but they both felt very comfortable.  I sharpened it briefly on my 1k/4k stone, and got a lot sharper a lot faster than my Messer.  I found it can use a steeling maybe once during a regular shift (usually very prep heavy) and once or twice during a double.  I think I will get a better feel for it after I do a more thorough sharpening job on it.  It hasn't been as reactive as I thought.  I used it for the first time to cut a pork loin and it turned bluish, but kinda slowed down from there, even after cutting apples, onions, and tomatoes.  So I am pretty happy with it so far.

 

For Christmas I will be receiving a Kikuichi Carbon Elite 270mm suji and an 8k Imanishi stone.  I chose the Kikuichi because from what I've read it seems to be about as good as the Misono, I have haven't heard anyone say anything negative about it, but a lot of praise for it.  Also, I wanted to take the opportunity to try different brands and steels.  Also, I ordered a 210mm Richmond Artifex for my brother for Christmas.  Should get it tomorrow, but by the description it sounds really nice, I'm kinda jealous.

 

My plan was to keep the 8k stone at work for polishing after sharpening and stropping before or after each shift instead of steeling, but I'm thinking it may be better just to use it for sharpening and use a steel when needed at work.  I currently have a 10" Henckels steel, which does have groves, but I am not sure if it's considered fine or medium because it does not say in the description and I have nothing to compare it to.  Does anyone have experience with this steel?  Would it be worthing getting the Idahone ceramic, or just strop it on the 8k?  Also, is 8k to polished for a gyuto/suji that is used mostly for veg and fish?  Anyway, thank you for all of you input so far, it really help me to make the right choice for me.  

post #29 of 42
Congratulations with your Swedish Carbon. It's one of my favourites.
It comes with a highly polished, very convexed edge. A few edge trailing strokes on your finest stone should be enough to refresh it.
With this kind of edge I would't use any rod. Leather or balsa would work much better and won't damage it. I have excellent results with newspaper; black ink is a great and cheap stropping compound.
post #30 of 42
Thread Starter 

So, I've sharpened my Misono a couple times and I think the last time I may have messed up and spent too much time on the stones (10min on 1000, 5min on 4000).  The first few times I shaprened it I only did like 2min on each stone, but this time I wanted take it a little further.  The front bevel at the heel is about 2mm wide, then 2" from the heel the bevel turns to 1mm, then back to 2mm when the blade begins to curve (about 4-5" from the heel) to the tip.  Is this really bad?  How can I fix it?  Should I sharpen it to the steeper angle (2mm bevel), or the wider angle?  If I sharpen to the wider angle, will I weaken the edge?  My stones include 220, 1000, 4000, and 8000.  I don't have a camera right now, so I can't take pictures.  I don't normally have problems sharpening, but this time I guess I was careless and didn't check the edge enough while sharpening.  I hope I didn't do too much damage to my new knife.  Also, I could bring it to Korin and have them re-establish a correct edge for me.

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