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What to do with shredded cabbage?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

I used half a bag of pre-shredded cabbage to make slaw but don't know what to do with the rest.  I don't like pickled things so I'm trying to think of something creative to do.

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post #2 of 26

Shredded cabbage makes a nice filling for Jiao Zi (Gyoza, Dumplings):

 

post #3 of 26

I serve raw cabbage with grilled sausages or deep fried items. You can serve a small bowl of vinegar, S & P, soy/fish sauce, chili and/or sugar with it. 

post #4 of 26

Miss KK, cabbage is used in many asian dishes

add to some shredded carrots and some bean sprouts and you have chop suey mix, very nice lightly steamed with a drizzle of soy sauce and sesame oil, nice change for a side dish

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post #5 of 26

Cabbage and sausage soup.

post #6 of 26

Plenty of soups use some cabbage too.

post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

Plenty of soups use some cabbage too.

True dat. In France there was a soup that quickly became the craze a few years ago because it was called the "thinning soup" a.k.a. miracle soup or miracle diet soup.... Basically supposed to make you thin. I don't know exactly how it works but I was always joking that the more you ate that soup the thinner you'd become. While I was already thin back then and didn't really care about that stuff, I always thought that soup tasted delicious. It's basically

 

- bell peppers

- cabbage

- onions

- tomatoes

- celery

post #8 of 26

Yeah, a dietician here in the US espouses a similar thing

http://www.zonya.com/pdf/recipes/Miracle_Soup.pdf

post #9 of 26

Fry it up with some sweet / sour flavours and spices (carroway) for german style side dish.

 

Add to sliced onions fry and garnish perogies.

 

Use as a filing in almost any dumplings.

 

Make into a salad with herbs for lettuce rolls or rice wrappers.

 

Use it on a more authentic version of taco's in place of the usual lettuce.

 

Make a different style of coleslaw - or even a hot slaw.

 

Chop it finer and use it as an extender in meat loaf / dumplings.

 

Turn it into a quick refrigerator pickle.  Dump it into an almost empty container of kimchee.

 

Asian soups especially ramen, sometimes slightly wilted with just salt.

 

Add to any stir-fry authentic or not.

 

edited to add - bangers and mash always has cabbage, shredded might look a bit funny but the dish can be done.

 

potatoes naturally means that cabbage croquettes are a possibility also

 

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Good luck and don't hesitate with any questions!

It shouldn't be too hard to find a use.


Edited by MichaelGA - 11/2/12 at 10:38pm

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post #10 of 26

Fry some meat, throw in some chili's, onions, a bit of garlic and the shredded cabbage (some carrot if you like). Fry a bit more and add "old" rice and you got the classic indonesian nasi goreng.

Serve with a fried egg and some cucumber strips.

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post #11 of 26

Oh that reminds me of something similar I used to do.

 

Bacon and Cabbage fried rice.  Use a chinese style bacon.

 

Chinese sausage and cabbage finely shredded and simply mixed in with steamed rice is great also.

Even better if made into a real fried rice, as noted above.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #12 of 26

Make egg rolls

saute cabbage with spice herbs ,garlic and onions  mix with bow tie pasta

Schav

Saute cabbage,bacon onions as a vege stuff in a tomato as a vege.

Japanese salad                         add to   Stir Fry dishes

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post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 

Oh so many good ideas!  If it were easy to get downtown today (we had a hurricane here) I would go to my favorite asian market and get myself some spring roll wrappers and make some shrimp rolls.  Maybe next time.

 

I've never used cabbage in a soup MaryB, what else is in it?

 

Michael, I didn't know bangers and mash has cabbage in it, really?  I usually make my bangers with an onion gravy - care to share a recipe with cabbage in it?

 

Ok so today for dinner I will use the shredded cabbage to make a fried rice (thanks for the idea!) based on my recipe for stuffed cabbage rolls. Saute onions, cabbage and a few diced tomatoes in olive oil.  Add pepper, cumin, paprika and fresh parsley.  Add carolina rice and sautee.  Add water and cover until it cooks. It will make a lovely side dish to some pork chops.

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post #14 of 26

I don't really have a recipe... slice some good smoked sausage into rounds and brown. In the same pan saute onion, celery, the cabbage until soft. Add chicken stock and shredded carrot. Simmer until carrot starts to get tender then add the sausage back to it. Could add garlic, other veg... this is a toss together soup for me usually.

post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

 

Michael, I didn't know bangers and mash has cabbage in it, really?  I usually make my bangers with an onion gravy - care to share a recipe with cabbage in it?

 

 

It might be a bit more of an Irish tradition than British to put cabbage in the dish, I guess more like colcannon.

 

I don't have a recipe per say but rather a method.  

 

Strongly seasoned but lean mashed potatoes, smothered in a tart onion and cabbage braise, topped with deliciously rich and fatty pork sausages.

 

Take your left over mashed potatoes (or make new) and add a bunch of fairly strong seasonings, but not to much butter or cream; they are balanced by the ample fat in the sausages.

Some common seasonings mustard, nutmeg (not much) green onions, kale (or other greens), lots of S&P, paprika, just about anything savory.

 

Make a gravy containing onions and cabbage. It should be slightly sweet and a bit sour or acidic as this will tie the potatoes and sausages together.  It should be bright and intensely flavoured.   Good additions are greens,green onions, carroway seeds, or even a few poppy seeds, a splash of vinegar or lime juice (even juice concentrate) maybe some cubed lean ham or bacon (canadian / irish style bacon that is).  Beer or wine (usually leftover from the night before's festivities would also be acceptable)

 

For the sausages you must use full fat english style sausages.   They should be gently simmered in beer or other flavourful liquid until 140 degrees internal and then quickly wiped off and given a hard sear to produce good markings and color.   The end temp should be 150 - 155 for home cooking meat from a reliable butcher but 160 is the 'legal' temp you need to hit commercially.

The sausages should not burst or split, if they do you are cooking at too high of a temp, or you started the sear with an overcooked or maybe torn skin sasauge.   The idea is you want the diner to cut them open and have all the lovely juices flow down over the gravy and mash (just like a soft egg, which by the way would go great with this dish).

 

Anyway mashed on the bottom, followed by the 'gravy' or braise (i call it a braise because there is not usually so much stuff in a gravy) and then topped by the sausage.  

 

I don't think that it can actually be done wrong - it's a new meal often made from leftover food.   It's also a 'traditional' dish so everyone and their grandmother will have a favourite.

Kind of like there is no "proper" recipe for Stew, Chile or numerous others.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #16 of 26

A cabbage soup made pretty much like a French onion soup is very nice, too.

 

Cheers,

Recky

post #17 of 26

Mix it with some bread cubes add a raw egg mix together top the chops with it and bake or butterfly chops stuff tham and bake.

The original Russian Borscht had cabbage in it. Not the red Jewish style, but I guess you could add it to that also.

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post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 

I guess there is no limit to what you can do with a humble vegetable like cabbage.  Thanks Michael, my husband loves an occasional dinner of bangers and mash and I'll have to incorporate cabbage in it next time.  Although I am not sure what a proper english sausage is.  Here I find a small selection of brats, but most accessible is the italian sausage.

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post #19 of 26

Similar to Bratwurst only milder.

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post #20 of 26

In Canada you just buy either 'english sausages' or 'bangers' as the manufacturer chooses.  

 

The key is that they will have a filler and be very mildly spiced.  Somewhere around 50% meat 20% fat, Spices 3% (or often less) and the rest filler (Rusk) and water (in the form of ice)((sometimes stock in upscale sausages)). Natural casing only.

 

From my understanding (limited) you can not market something as a "Sausage" in the USA unless it is a minimum 96% Meat and Fat any combo.  

Thus the multitude of 'breakfast links' and 'patties' etc.

Subsequently they have never really caught on as they aren't "real" sausages.

 

Here is a good resource that I trust that takes the topic much further than I ever would but it's a great read!

 

http://www.thepauperedchef.com/2010/03/homemade-british-bangers-and-the-search-for-rusk.html

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #21 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelGA View Post

In Canada you just buy either 'english sausages' or 'bangers' as the manufacturer chooses.  

 

The key is that they will have a filler and be very mildly spiced.  Somewhere around 50% meat 20% fat, Spices 3% (or often less) and the rest filler (Rusk) and water (in the form of ice)((sometimes stock in upscale sausages)). Natural casing only.

 

From my understanding (limited) you can not market something as a "Sausage" in the USA unless it is a minimum 96% Meat and Fat any combo.  

Thus the multitude of 'breakfast links' and 'patties' etc.

Subsequently they have never really caught on as they aren't "real" sausages.

 

Here is a good resource that I trust that takes the topic much further than I ever would but it's a great read!

 

http://www.thepauperedchef.com/2010/03/homemade-british-bangers-and-the-search-for-rusk.html

 

That's a great tutorial.  I have no intention of making my own sausage yet but very insightful.  It calls for mace as one of the ingredients, I don't even know what that is. 

 

Breakfast links..... guilty of loving them.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #22 of 26

Mace is the covering that is found on the exterior of a nutmeg.

Most asian or carabean markets will carry it.

 

http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Myri_fra.html

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #23 of 26

If you look around carefully at the spice section of a few different grocers, you'll probably find a very small container of ground mace at one of them.

post #24 of 26

cabbage kofta tikka masala

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post #25 of 26

700

Shredded cabbage, pita, home made veal kofta and feta with greek basil.

post #26 of 26

NUTMEG AND MACE are very close one being the inner side  the other the outer of the berry or pod.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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