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Do you really need a meat mallet?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Ive used most anything I close to hand. A rolling pin, frying pan, baseball bat, my hardcover copy of Les Miserables (don't tell anyone I did that :blush: ). Is this just another kitchen gizmo or is it really an essential buy?

Jodi

PS

For those of you wondering out there.....my meat WAS wrapped in Saran Wrap. Im not COMPLETELY nuts you know!
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
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Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
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post #2 of 12
No, you don't. But like many kitchen tasks, it's easier and quicker with the right tool. Let your storage space and budget decide.

Phil
post #3 of 12

Mallet

Not sure what they're called, but I've had huge success with one of those heavy stainless steel disks with a handle attached. Much easier to control the "smack" than a mallet, the weight does half the work, easy clean-up when the plastic wrap over the chicken rips (well, except for the walls.....). Even better, it makes a uniformly smooth easy-to-use tool for patting out cheesecake crusts, etc.
post #4 of 12
I have one of those hammer-type pounders with a flat face and a toothed face. But I agree with Georgeair; sometimes it's hard to control.

The flat one you mention is a batti carni (hit the meat!). I agree it would give a more uniform pounding and you'd have less chance of making dents in the meat. If you can afford it, go for it!
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post #5 of 12

Another option...

Something else to consider would be a rubber mallet from the hardware store. It usually has a larger striking face than a standard meat mallet, thereby avoiding damaging your future dinner. You may get some strange looks when you pull one of these out of a kitchen drawer, but, whatever works!
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Now THAT'S an idea HB! :lol:
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
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Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
post #7 of 12

Bring on the cast iron

When faced with a lot of meat and not much time, another low cost / high speed option is a cast iron skillet. You can cover a lot of ground quickly! Careful - don't do this over the dishwasher or any other relatively weak space on your counter or your free mallet will turn into an expensive cabinet or counter repair if you get carried away.

George
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
AHA! Iam NOT alone! :lol: Yep my cast iron skillet works wonders plus I use it for more than one job.
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
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Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
post #9 of 12
A little Hammer work can be good if the crew starts to act out a little . Those big old meat hammers are very intimidating , of course so is a cast iron skillet , especially in the hands of an angry woman ( I remember mom ) . To be truthfull though I have 2 hammers , 1 big and 1 small , and I use them more for pounding nails then pounding meat . For chicken breasts I prefer an egg or omelet pan myself . Of course thats just my opinion .
The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
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The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
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post #10 of 12
ShawtyCat,

To answer your question: If you can afford one which you will like and use enough to justify the cost, than sure, get one. Otherwise it will just take up space.

:)
post #11 of 12
I was serving medallions of venison as a special one night. One table made the inevetible connection between venison and the movie "Bambi" and how cruel I must be to be cooking deer and all that but in the end someone at the table ended up ordering it. So I go into the kitchen and start to prepare the venison by pounding it paper thin with my mallet. I had left a pan on the counter and the first few whacks were a little loud and I heard someone talking about all the racket in the kitchen. I poked my head out of the kitchen and replied "Thats' Bambis' friend. Thumper".
What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
:lol: That's hilarious Peach :lol:
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
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