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Personal health and nutrition, exercise

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, I searched high and low on this, and am really looking for some viable tips, tricks, and solutions...

I have been working in restaurants for about 10 years now.  Started in high school as a dish, moved quickly up through prep, super-stared on the line in a variety of places in a variety of positions.  I have worked for corporations, I have been in fine dining, and stayed loyal to my original diner job for years as a second source of income, and to demonstrate dependability on my resume.  Recently, I found a career prospect that made me feel stable enough to part ways with the diner.  I have quickly worked my way up through the ranks, and have stepped off the line into management.  I still cover shifts on the line, and depending on the strength of the crew on that day, have to step in to help to keep them from going under.

 

In any case, 10 years has taken its toll thus far, and I am really looking for any tips and tricks to get back into shape outside of the life-consuming work week this career gives you. I am in my late 20s, but feel more like 50.  Flat feet, carpel tunnel, tendonitis in my dominant hand, overweight enough, cant keep a sleep cycle, and I don't know what its like to not have circles under my eyes... the usual :)  I am lucky enough to have a chiropractor as a friend, so at least my back is not completely shot.

I know all the things I am supposed to do; 30 min cardio daily; some weight training; eat less more often, every 2-3 hours; veggies, lean proteins, and whole grains; 9 hours of sleep.  HOWEVER, we all know the back breaking work this is, breaks are not always an option, and remembering to eat at all during the day is hilarious. When you do remember, proper eats are rarely available, and outside of the many hours dedicated to the workplace, its rough to lift a finger to keep the house in order, let alone find time for fitness, and sleep is that thing you do when your phone is off and you miss their phone calls calling you back in, lol :D


I feel that this is a huge issue facing a lot of people in the industry, and no one really touches on it too much.  Any tips, tricks, or advice to help incorporate more healthy habits that wont kill me? :)

post #2 of 16
Thread Starter 

Bump?  Been up here a week and no response yet...  Is there simply no solution?

post #3 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by piratedeb View Post

I know all the things I am supposed to do; 30 min cardio daily; some weight training; eat less more often, every 2-3 hours; veggies, lean proteins, and whole grains; 9 hours of sleep.

And let us not forget to drink enough fluids in the day, of which I am guilty. There are many times I think about going for that 30 minute walk but I am just too tired.

The body is not meant to work like that, so many chefs get burnout.

Finding proper balance in own's lifestyle is key.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 16

In case you are still awainting a reply, I'll give my two cents. From what you wrote, it sounds like much of the past ten years was spent working two jobs. That has stopped. Stopping also means you don't fill that time with more time at your current job. You know how to be a good line cook. Now spend time learning how to manage.

     Someone once said that a sign of being a good manager is that the place runs well without you. Obviously you need to be there alot of the time to over see things, but you should not have to be there all the time. Providing enough tools and training, setting clear expectations for the staff, delegating authority as well as responsibility, trusting others to do the job well are all part of management. 

       You mention "....you miss their phone calls calling you back in". This tells me something important is missing from the organization. That may or may not be within your power to change but I'd work on identifying areas of organiztion and delegation that could be causing that. Your job is to help empower the staff to know what you expect and have all the tools to produce it, even when you are not there.

As far as the physical is concerned, like petalsandcoco said, drink lots of water. Make sure you wear good shoes. This forum has a good thread on that. One of the best restaurants in NYC has an employee meal break in the middle of the day. Others handle it in other ways but they make sure everyone is fed.

 Perhaps most importantly, as an entry level manager, you do not have total control over the decision making. Notice closely how your supervisors are guiding the place over all. Is everyone working crazy hours or just you? Is the place generally unorganized? Is every day going from one crisis to another and there is no end in sight? You may be trying to keep your sanity in an insane asylum. If that's the case, get the hell out. You can only learn good management skills in a place that has them already.

post #5 of 16

After my first lumbar fusion core exercises were recommended (Pilate's and/or yoga).

Went for a bit and (after my muscles were stronger) became a sloth once more.

Sooo had to have another fusion, only this time he had to include a few more discs (now I have to see a pain management doc).

So.

My advice is Take Care Of Your Back!

There are exercises that can be done for free, just google and download them.

I know, I know...exercise is boring.

Just Do It!!

 

mimi

post #6 of 16

first off at your age 9 hours of sleep is just plain crazy.   id suggest you find a hobby like frisbee golf.  its free,everywhere,and in general a brisk walk in the park.   find something really fun to do and do what it takes to do it as often as you can.  

post #7 of 16

I agree, 9 hours is kind of long. If I get 4-5 hours of sleep , I'm happy. Even if I wanted to sleep for longer , my internal clock says " You better get up, there is stuff to do ".

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 16

A simple solution for me was to ride a bike to work.  I feel better (less tired) when I get there, and feel better (less insane) when I get home.  And I don't have to park my car.

post #9 of 16

After my first few months working in a kitchen I found that I was pretty hyped up after my shift, and could never get to sleep at a decent hour, therefore, when I woke up, it was late and I didn't want to do anything. My solution was packing my gym bag with me to work, finding a local 24 hr track or gym and hitting that up as soon as I get off. I'm almost always the only person there, and not only does it help me stay in shape, but it helps me sleep better, more regular as well. 

 

As far as the eating goes... meh I'm not sure. I taste everything I make, but that's not "eating." Some days I eat a time or two, sometimes I never really get any meals in. I've tried several different ways to regulate an eating schedule, but they all crash and burn. 

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dardeau View Post

A simple solution for me was to ride a bike to work.  I feel better (less tired) when I get there, and feel better (less insane) when I get home.  And I don't have to park my car.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by R6Zack View Post

After my first few months working in a kitchen I found that I was pretty hyped up after my shift, and could never get to sleep at a decent hour, therefore, when I woke up, it was late and I didn't want to do anything. My solution was packing my gym bag with me to work, finding a local 24 hr track or gym and hitting that up as soon as I get off. I'm almost always the only person there, and not only does it help me stay in shape, but it helps me sleep better, more regular as well. 

 

As far as the eating goes... meh I'm not sure. I taste everything I make, but that's not "eating." Some days I eat a time or two, sometimes I never really get any meals in. I've tried several different ways to regulate an eating schedule, but they all crash and burn. 

+ 1 for everything suggested so far .

 

I have tried the Gym after work - when I used to work nights - & now that I have a Teaching Job ( Comm Cookery )- Mon to Fri 7am till 3 -  I have rented a Garage 7km from work ( sorry don't work in miles ) and do the commute on the Single Speed ( a Trek Earl ) every day , I feel great when I get to work and wind down sufficiently enough after the ride back - lost 20kg too !!!!!

Drink lots of water and get a hobby completely outside of work for your down time , it'll keep you active and happy !

I have also discovered Fresh Juices - Beetroot , Ginger & Orange - really clean you out and give a great hit of energy to start the day . 

My posts are different , I speak in cm , Celsius , kilo's and call stuff weird names like Glad Wrap , Bicarb , Capsicum & Gravox . Might take you a little while to get my lingo but we're basically speaking the same language 

 

http://sneakykitchen.com/Glossary/translations.htm

 

Good onya...

Reply

My posts are different , I speak in cm , Celsius , kilo's and call stuff weird names like Glad Wrap , Bicarb , Capsicum & Gravox . Might take you a little while to get my lingo but we're basically speaking the same language 

 

http://sneakykitchen.com/Glossary/translations.htm

 

Good onya...

Reply
post #11 of 16

I live in SF which a very bike friendly city.  Granted my job/house/girlfriends are probably no more than 2 miles from each other, but with all the hills I definitely get my 30 minutes of cardio.  I just joined 24 hour fitness to a location thats on my way to my new job. Like what was mentioned above, I'm hyped after work so a quick 40 minute workout balances out that adrenaline rush.  I mean, the equation is very simple you just have to follow some simple guidelines.  Sounds like YOU already know the answers, you just need to put it into action.  For me, if i could just cut back on the booze, eat breakfast at least 3 days a week and just use some portion control, I'd drop some lbs quick.

post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by R6Zack View Post

After my first few months working in a kitchen I found that I was pretty hyped up after my shift, and could never get to sleep at a decent hour, therefore, when I woke up, it was late and I didn't want to do anything. My solution was packing my gym bag with me to work, finding a local 24 hr track or gym and hitting that up as soon as I get off. I'm almost always the only person there, and not only does it help me stay in shape, but it helps me sleep better, more regular as well. 

 

As far as the eating goes... meh I'm not sure. I taste everything I make, but that's not "eating." Some days I eat a time or two, sometimes I never really get any meals in. I've tried several different ways to regulate an eating schedule, but they all crash and burn. 

 

There is only one 24 hour gym in my area.  It is always packed. all. the. time.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dardeau View Post

A simple solution for me was to ride a bike to work.  I feel better (less tired) when I get there, and feel better (less insane) when I get home.  And I don't have to park my car.

 

When I had an apartment close by I did bike to and from work, it ramped me up on the way in and cooled me down on the way home(just not in the snow).  However, I have since purchased a house, and now a very bad part of town lies in a long swath between where I live, and where I work, making going around it very difficult.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by smork View Post

first off at your age 9 hours of sleep is just plain crazy.   id suggest you find a hobby like frisbee golf.  its free,everywhere,and in general a brisk walk in the park.   find something really fun to do and do what it takes to do it as often as you can.  

 

I dont get 9 hours of sleep, 4 or 5 at most, and I wake up tired most days.  I wake up refreshed on the off chance when I get a full night to rest.  Granted, if the job wasn't so consuming, my cycles would probably even out, and 4 or 5 would be all that I need.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chefwriter View Post

In case you are still awainting a reply, I'll give my two cents. From what you wrote, it sounds like much of the past ten years was spent working two jobs. That has stopped. Stopping also means you don't fill that time with more time at your current job. You know how to be a good line cook. Now spend time learning how to manage.

     Someone once said that a sign of being a good manager is that the place runs well without you. Obviously you need to be there alot of the time to over see things, but you should not have to be there all the time. Providing enough tools and training, setting clear expectations for the staff, delegating authority as well as responsibility, trusting others to do the job well are all part of management. 

       You mention "....you miss their phone calls calling you back in". This tells me something important is missing from the organization. That may or may not be within your power to change but I'd work on identifying areas of organiztion and delegation that could be causing that. Your job is to help empower the staff to know what you expect and have all the tools to produce it, even when you are not there.

As far as the physical is concerned, like petalsandcoco said, drink lots of water. Make sure you wear good shoes. This forum has a good thread on that. One of the best restaurants in NYC has an employee meal break in the middle of the day. Others handle it in other ways but they make sure everyone is fed.

 Perhaps most importantly, as an entry level manager, you do not have total control over the decision making. Notice closely how your supervisors are guiding the place over all. Is everyone working crazy hours or just you? Is the place generally unorganized? Is every day going from one crisis to another and there is no end in sight? You may be trying to keep your sanity in an insane asylum. If that's the case, get the hell out. You can only learn good management skills in a place that has them already.

 

And it all boils down to this.  The place IS poorly organized, and much of that is beyond my control.  Very high turnover, half of the staff is just bodies, they still have a job because they simply haven't left yet and we need someone on the shift.  We have very few people that can handle the line efficiently and are worth their wage, and I don't even want to entertain FoH issues right now, that is not entirely my domain. Every one of the supervisors are working crazy hours as well.  One crisis to another and no end in sight sounds about right.
I know the solution is to get the hell out of this place, but dollar signs are a very valuable motivator right now, and I know I am getting paid on the high end of average for my area because of the rapport I have built with my superiors.  I didn't think that money would be such a huge motivator until I started interviewing elsewhere and discussed wage and hours.  My pokerface got better with each interview, but the first one was very low and like a huge punch in the gut.  Now, I am not making bank by any means where I am at, lmao, but its enough to be significantly more than what starting anywhere else can offer me at the moment....  *le sigh*

 

...how about just advice to get out of this industry XD

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by piratedeb View Post

  

...how about just advice to get out of this industry XD

 

Those that can do ........those that can't teach 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wait a minute , I'm a teacher .......'

 

doh

 

Seriously if you have the personality , patience and the know how , Teaching is definitely the Go !!

In Australia I did a Cert 4 in Training & Assessment - teach at Tech Level - that taught me to teach , got my qualifications assessed and had to submit a Employment Matrix that matched Qualifications to Experience and haven't looked back - good money , mon to fri weekends off no nights - living the dream mate !! 

My posts are different , I speak in cm , Celsius , kilo's and call stuff weird names like Glad Wrap , Bicarb , Capsicum & Gravox . Might take you a little while to get my lingo but we're basically speaking the same language 

 

http://sneakykitchen.com/Glossary/translations.htm

 

Good onya...

Reply

My posts are different , I speak in cm , Celsius , kilo's and call stuff weird names like Glad Wrap , Bicarb , Capsicum & Gravox . Might take you a little while to get my lingo but we're basically speaking the same language 

 

http://sneakykitchen.com/Glossary/translations.htm

 

Good onya...

Reply
post #14 of 16

Sounds like it's time to start discussing responsibility and authority with your superiors. Since no one wants to hear of problems without solutions, identify a few clear cut problems and write down whatever ideas you think would help. Go over the entire operation and write down everything you think of. When you are ready, begin approaching your superiors about fixing things. Perhaps suggest an idea or two at a time to see how responsive they are. Either they don't have any idea of how to run things better and will welcome your suggestions, OR they are permanently dysfunctional. Perhaps a little of both. If you make a sincere attempt to correct the situation and get  a continuously negative response, getting out to a different job with lower pay may be your only option. .

post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefwriter View Post

Sounds like it's time to start discussing responsibility and authority with your superiors. Since no one wants to hear of problems without solutions, identify a few clear cut problems and write down whatever ideas you think would help. Go over the entire operation and write down everything you think of. When you are ready, begin approaching your superiors about fixing things. Perhaps suggest an idea or two at a time to see how responsive they are. Either they don't have any idea of how to run things better and will welcome your suggestions, OR they are permanently dysfunctional. Perhaps a little of both. If you make a sincere attempt to correct the situation and get  a continuously negative response, getting out to a different job with lower pay may be your only option. .

 



A lot of our issues could be solved if we simply were properly staffed with good attitudes. If we had a solid staff of people that actually cared about their job enough to do it properly, it would be less of a burden.  If the BoH had grownups that didnt have to be babysat it would be much better. It would allow us to give more attention to other issues.

post #16 of 16

I'm sorry. I should have been more clear. You originally posted you have stepped off the line into management. That's the responsibility part. Now you need the authority to hire and FIRE people.

The implied threat (once everyone knows you can do it, you won't need to remind them) of dismissal should make the Boh sit up and take notice when you give instructions. Of course, then you will need to hire people. That's a different can of worms.

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