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Many saute pans going at once!

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I'm new to saute and I'm curious to how chefs or cooks can manage a bunch of saute pans at once time, not burning the food and cooking them all perfectly. I have seen a guy do 10 pans at one given time consistently throughout service. How on earth is this possible?? Can someone teach me or help me?? Thank you.
post #2 of 24

Its purely practise, give it a few days and you'll hopefully get the hang of it.

post #3 of 24
Takes more than a few days.......lots of practice, timing and knowing your menu well.
post #4 of 24

Takes practice in timing, organization, focus and the skill of prioritizing. Don't let frustration get the better of you, especially the first few weeks you're going to f some things up. Stay calm, put your head down and begin again.

post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thank you. But how is it that skilled cooks can remember like 10 things, saute 10 different things, and constantly do that for the whole service? I can barely saute three pans, and at that I'm already almost burning something in another pan. What's the thought process or what is the cook thinking when they are doing this?
post #6 of 24
Practice as with anything else
Good, consistent mise. If you get flustered with the location of an item it could spell disaster
Timing

You'll get used to it
post #7 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wind draft View Post

Thank you. But how is it that skilled cooks can remember like 10 things, saute 10 different things, and constantly do that for the whole service? I can barely saute three pans, and at that I'm already almost burning something in another pan. What's the thought process or what is the cook thinking when they are doing this?

I don't want to make this sound more difficult, but you pretty much don't think, you just know

Cream needs parmesan, hit the halibut with wine, flip the salmon, lower the halibut, stir cream sauce and lower, put pasta in water

It just kind of... happens. Don't worry about speed off the bat though, work on technique. Speed comes with time
post #8 of 24

practice

habit 

routine 

knowing and being comfortable with your dishes and ingredients 

 

that said I can't do 10 lol

post #9 of 24

Chef Bubba is right . It takes more then a few days, it takes a great memory , an eye for detail and great timing. Learned  over some extended time to be really good at it.. That; s  if you are in a better type place, in a fast food deep fry type  place a few days is ok. and you will pass..

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wind draft View Post

Thank you. But how is it that skilled cooks can remember like 10 things, saute 10 different things, and constantly do that for the whole service? I can barely saute three pans, and at that I'm already almost burning something in another pan. What's the thought process or what is the cook thinking when they are doing this?

System.  They have a system.

 

And an expediter helps too.

 

Frankly though, these days very few people actually saute and make sauce a la minute anymore so it's a little bit easier.  Plus a lot of times the stuff gets finished in the oven.

post #11 of 24
Repetition, repetition, repetition... Years of practice and refining your technique, and it really helps to have a good system in place with good organization. But for speed and all those pans, repetition is key. Just like any professional athlete, they are constantly practicing and repeating even the most mundane tasks ,so o that when game time comes, all you have to do is read and react. Sometimes having to think can really trip you up!
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
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A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
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post #12 of 24

As others have said, you don't have time to think. If you think you'll be weeded out in no time. Know your menu to the point of reaction, you shouldn't have to think about a dish. Once you get the fire order the time for thinking is over. Learn to cook with all your senses, not just taste. Sight, smell, touch, and hearing all are required to run a busy saute station. Also economy of motion is a big factor in being successful on saute. If you are taking more then two steps away from the range then you are doing something wrong and you might want to rethink,after service or for the next service, your setup. I have ran a 12 burner station and when I wasn't thinking and everyone was on, that was the funnest, when I started to think and analyse a dish I would fall behind and that is not fun. Don't get upset if you don't get it the first few weeks or months even. just make sure the food is perfect and you get a thorough knowledge of your menu

post #13 of 24

On my setup I am anal. I want everything in exactly the same place every time I set up so that when it starts to really fly, my hands know almost intuitively where to reach for what. No looking, no thinking, just doing. Like playing an instrument.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #14 of 24

I agree with cheflayne about having your set up exactly the same everytime.  For me when it gets really busy, I will start stacking pans with the start ingredient for that single dish on the top.  Then its uber easy to know what you still gotta cook while all burners are being used and still getting orders.

post #15 of 24
Make sure you, the dishwasher and the dish runner are on really good terms too. It's a terrible feeling when the printer is going and your pans aren't coming back

If there's any mess ups or extra orders, take them back to the dish person munch on while you have a minute. Or if your establishment won't permis that, buy them a burger or whatever the cheapest thing on your menu is to take home and you make it yourself after service. Always take care of your diahwasher
post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thank you everyone for the generous help and advice. I'm going to give it a try for a few weeks and see how it goes. I think my main problem right now is still understanding how to cook their food. It's weird they change the way each dish is executed a bunch of times so its hard to know what's the latest. I only saute three nights a week.
Edited by Wind draft - 11/8/12 at 11:49pm
post #17 of 24

I hope that is a typo....

 

 

 

Quote:
 I think my main problem right now is still understanding how to cool their food.

 

 

 

 

;)

 

Good Luck 

 

(just ask if you have any more questions)

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #18 of 24
Thread Starter 
I meant to say how to cook their food cause it changes constantly on how the chef wants it cook, forget that she taught me one way and change it back. It's crazy!!
post #19 of 24

i try to train my guys to get into a tunnel vision type of thing when the tickets are stacking up.   never stress and always lead the dance.   start with 2 or 3 pans today,and when ready to add on another,do so.   make all your movements tedias,and fluid.   feel the fire.   control the fire.   "yes chef"   "yes chef"   its you and the tickets.   are your pans hot?   nothing but maybe a soup reheat or cream sauce should ever go in a cold drippy pan.   concentrate on being steady.   if you can acheive that then the rest will naturally fall into place.   if not then its back to the pantry or dish pit for you.   nothing wrong with working eitherway.  

post #20 of 24
Most of its been covered, but another thing I woul recommend is to study at home. What I mean is mentally go through each dish on yor station. When X is called, what pans go down in what order and what goes in each in what order. Do this as much as needed, so there's no hesitation in knowing. Eventually it becomes second nature.
Really, I find the cooking part of Sautee fun. What makes it hectic is when you don't have plating help. That part gets extra tricky working out the rhythm and timing.
post #21 of 24
Alot of things have been mention but i feel like learning how to control your heat is one of the most important things. Paying attention to how hot your pans are is critical it will save alot.of headaches and timei
post #22 of 24

I'll second the no-thinking.  I've been 50 tickets deep on a 10 burner and just sat inside myself observing and wondering how my hands knew how to do everything so fast without me telling them to.

post #23 of 24
And don't forget those knobs on the stove are adjustable, they're not just on/off switches for fire.
post #24 of 24

Speed , repetition and repetition !!

 

I took a job in a busy Italian Cafe because I knew it would improve my speed and accuracy . 

 

Set up is key , have your Mise en place where you want it and at hand when you need it .

 

A good rapport with your brigade will let you really fly in the kitchen , it is like playing a musical instrument as others have said , you are just a player and the Head Chef is the conductor .

 

Revel in the stress and the cacophony that is a busy restaurant - I worked in an open kitchen once and we knew the moment when individual conversations ceased to be heard and the hum began that it was going to be a good busy night . Stress is something that the more you deal with it the easier it becomes to move within it and experience will help you to deal with it .

 

It will take time but the journey is worth just as much as the reward .

 

Make your bones and enjoy the ride !!!!

My posts are different , I speak in cm , Celsius , kilo's and call stuff weird names like Glad Wrap , Bicarb , Capsicum & Gravox . Might take you a little while to get my lingo but we're basically speaking the same language 

 

http://sneakykitchen.com/Glossary/translations.htm

 

Good onya...

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My posts are different , I speak in cm , Celsius , kilo's and call stuff weird names like Glad Wrap , Bicarb , Capsicum & Gravox . Might take you a little while to get my lingo but we're basically speaking the same language 

 

http://sneakykitchen.com/Glossary/translations.htm

 

Good onya...

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