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Using inadvertantly frozen fruits

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

The other day, upon returning home after shopping, I left a bag of avocados and a container of  campari tomatoes in the back of my vehicle. What with temps in the teens they froze solid. Stymied as to what to do with them I've kept them in my freezer until I can find out what if anything can be done to make use of them.

 

I assume that the tomatoes could be used to make a soup.

Other possibilities?

 

The avocados appear to be a bit more problematical.

Can anything be done to make use of the avos, or are they a lost cause?

post #2 of 8

Both should still be ok . Avocado should now be peeled frozen , they can be used for quac. or a puree of some type. Tomatoes for Bruschetta, pizza  or anything for that matter. The acid content is so high it will help act as a preservative 

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #3 of 8

If you leave the avocados out on the counter for a day or two to ripen they should be fine. If you bought them ripe , those are good suggestions from Chef Ed. Otherwise a nice avocado soup never hurts.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks chefedb.

 

Bruschetta sounds good.

It's new to me and looks interesting.

 

I know, I've got soup on the brain.

Whenever I think produce has been compromised that's where my thoughts go.

In looking around before coming here, I saw several avocado soup recipes.

Again a new to me and interesting looking thought.

Most of the recipes I saw called for the avocados to be uncooked.

I worry about the suitability of the frozen avos being used this way.

I assume that if something acidic [lemon, lime, pineapple, etc] were added while thawing-pureeing, the avocados would be less likely to turn brown.

 

EDIT

Thanks petalsandcoco,

You posted while I was doing this up.

The avos were not fully ripe an were still hard.

I was concerned that they would not have the flavor of a fully ripe fruit.

I'm glad to see your suggestion of avo soup.

post #5 of 8

No problem.

 

 

Yes, adding lemon/lime juice will stop them from turning brown.

 

Avocados have an enzyne called polyphenol ozidase. When air hits the flesh, it oxidized giving the change of color.

 

Petals.

 

ps. for a hot soup you can always make a chicken avocado soup.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 8

You may want to try all Mexican  the tomatoes for salsa the avacado as a Quac or garnish.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

I've already decided to try an adaption of a "Chicken Lime Avocado" soup this coming Saturday evening.

But, with 6 of the frozen avos, I have enough left over to try a guacomale concoction with some of the the left over tomatoes also.

Thanks.
 

post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 

Using frozen Avocados verdict:

 

Well, I made an adaption of this recipe:

http://www.yummly.com/recipe/external/Mexican-Chicken-Lime-Soup-Recipezaar

 

Leaving out:

Hot Sauce

 

Adding ingredients from 2 other similar recipes:

Red & Yellow Bell Peppers

Sour Cream

 

The Avos were, as I said, not fully ripe.

After thawing enough to cut up, they were VERY tough and rubbery, just the opposite of what I thought they would be, also almost tasteless.

I've decided to allow the 3 leftover avos to thaw and see what they do, and if they will ripen on their own after being frozen.

If not they are not usable as far as I'm concerned.

I would rather use tasty ripe avos.

 

I decided to see what cooking the finely chopped avos would do.

So, I took the avo, lime, & 1/3 of the tomatoes mixture with enough water to bring to a low heat boil.

After about 15 min the avos did soften.

They never did obtain much flavor.

 

The Chicken-Lime-Tomato-Avocado[?]-Cream Soup did turn out much to our liking.

It was quite good.

But, we were disappointed at the lack of avo flavors in the soup.

 

Other things to consider:

I never follow a recipe.

I use them as guides.

I may add ingredients from other recipes if they appeal to me and seem compatible.

I always end up with several times more result than the recipe says I should.

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