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The M390 Ultimatum is well named. It literally has no peer!

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Well, after 3 months of using my Richmond Ultimatum in M390 steel I must say it has no peer that I've ever seen when it comes to edge retention.  After 3 weeks of daily use, six days a week it would still shave.  And after 3 months, a few licks on my glass hone brings it back to where it will shave a little, although not cleanly.  At this point it's still sharper than my coworkers knives.  I don't recall ever using anything that will hold an edge remotely this long.  I think my previous champ was my Akifusa in SRS-15, but M390 bests it easily.  Bear in mind that the first time I used the hone was after three months of daily use!

 

Even though I don't need it, I'm really thinking of adding the 210mm Artifex in M390 to my collection.

 

The only bad thing about M390 is that it's monotonous; it leaves nothing left to talk about.  It's utterly stainproof.  Nothing will cause it to patina in the slightest.  Nothing seems to dull it, either.  And it may be a complete fluke or maybe Mark sent me a ringer but my particular Ultimatum was the sharpest knife OOtB I've ever seen.

 

Standard disclaimers apply; I'm a long time customer of CKtG that occasionally does sharpening work for them.  Beyond that I have no affiliation.

 

I hope Mark with work with Lamson & Goodnow to bring out more knives in M390.  So far it's all upside with no downside that I've seen.  I don't use this phrase very often but it's truly a game changer.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #2 of 5

Phaedrus, you charioteer of the gods you,

 

Not to change the topic, but -- excluding edge holding -- how would you rate the grind, edge taking, ergonomics and gestalt of the Ultimatum M390? 

 

If you've spent quality time with a Masamoto KS, how would you compare the two knives? 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 11/19/12 at 8:46am
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Unfortunately, I've only used the Moritaka KS, a "clone" of the Masamoto.  While the Ultimatum was supposed to be a copy more of less of those knives, sadly it's not a close one.  The Ultimatum has a pretty long flat spot but not so long and flat as the Moritaka KS (and presumably the Masamoto).  Also, compared to my Moritaka the tip is much higher.  If the Ultimatum truly duplicated the KS I would buy two more of them and sell half of my collection.  Alas, it does not.  But it does have less belly than the average Japanese gyuto.

 

The Ultimatum does have a good grind though.  Not quite the near zero convex they were probably aiming for, but good.  My particular knife came very sharp.  I consider the F'n'F to be good, although a buddy of mine was disappointed with his in that regard.  Either there's some variation in the CQ or, more likely, he's just a real stickler  (and he is a fussy f*cker about such things...lol.gif).  As a user it's great.

 

I like the handle,  It's an attractive Wa styled handle.  I don't really see the glue where it's attached, although it wouldn't bug me if I did.  I have lots of Wa's and this one is a bit nicer than the average.  Not quite so exquisite as my Nubatama, but then it didn't cost $800, either.

 

If there was anything to "knock" at all I'd say it's not as svelt as the Nubatama.  It's no ax, and probably a little short of being called "mighty" but it's no laser, either.  I haven't really noticed wedging but it might wedge cutting squash or something.  Overall it maybe lacks the finesse or je ne sais quoi of a Konosuke or Masamoto.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #4 of 5

Phaedrus:

 

Why did you decide to go with the M390 steel versus the other Ultimatum options?  I am too looking to possibly acquire one myself.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

just a little uncork'd...
 

post #5 of 5

This may be of interest to those considering M390.

 

Dave

 

 

http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/9294-Any-Ultimatum-m390-reports

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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