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Help please !!

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I left boiled potatoes out over night that are to go in my stuffing today ( pork stuffing that will be baked ) are they still safe to use ??

post #2 of 13

When in doubt throw it out.  Potatoes are not too expensive so it shouldn't be too difficult to chuck 'em and boil up a new batch.  Happy Thanksgiving!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #3 of 13

Welcome to Cheftalk mccormack,

 

I agree with KK, not safe, throw them out. There has been enough evidence to show that Botulism can occur in potatoes which have been left out, why thake that chance.

 

1) Make sure the potatoes are eaten within 2hr of being cooked, or

2) Keep potatoes at 60 C or hotter

3) Refrigerate the potatoes within 2 hours of being cooked.

 

Petals.

Petals
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Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 13

From what I've read, botulin is neutralized by cooking for 10 minutes. What's more, Clostridium botulinum is anaerobic bacteria, and as far as I know, those cases of botulism from potatoes were from baked potatoes that were left for too long in their aluminium foil = anaerobic environment. I don't think this is your case. Personally, I wouldn't worry at all and would use them but it's up to you.

post #5 of 13

Do not eat. Slayer, your advice could kill someone. The bacteria can be killed BUT the toxin produced CANNOT be neutralized. Once the toxin is there, it is there.

post #6 of 13

There's a lot of liability in some of these posts.  Just toss 'em (the 'taters) out and use freshly boiled ones.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurenlulu View Post

Do not eat. Slayer, your advice could kill someone. The bacteria can be killed BUT the toxin produced CANNOT be neutralized. Once the toxin is there, it is there.


I'm not making it up.

 

''Unlike the staphylococcal enterotoxins and heat-stable toxins of other foodborne pathogens, the botulinal toxins are heat sensitive and may be destroyed by heating at 80◦C (176◦F) for 10 minutes, or boiling temperatures for a few minutes.''

 

It's right there, in Modern Food Microbiology, 7th ed., page 581, black on white. It's a chemical process called denaturation and it is the same thing that allows tough cuts to become tender by long braising, by denaturation of collagen.

post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slayertplsko View Post


I'm not making it up.

 

''Unlike the staphylococcal enterotoxins and heat-stable toxins of other foodborne pathogens, the botulinal toxins are heat sensitive and may be destroyed by heating at 80◦C (176◦F) for 10 minutes, or boiling temperatures for a few minutes.''

 

It's right there, in Modern Food Microbiology, 7th ed., page 581, black on white. It's a chemical process called denaturation and it is the same thing that allows tough cuts to become tender by long braising, by denaturation of collagen.

 

That said, Slavertplsko, would you actually serve some loved ones thoroughly cooked food that was once infected with botulism???  Huh???  Personally I'd throw it out in the garbage.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #9 of 13

Yes,the ptaoes are still good,however before stuffing it( if you do) bring it back top a boil at 165 degree to kill the possible bacteria.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post

 

That said, Slavertplsko, would you actually serve some loved ones thoroughly cooked food that was once infected with botulism???  Huh???  Personally I'd throw it out in the garbage.


If there is no danger of botulism anymore, yes. You might as well get botulism from store-bought canned food or store-bought sausages - you never know if the procedures were followed exactly (=boil for 3 minutes at 121°C to kill the spores in case of canned food) or there is some flaw in the product and it might be infected. You cannot know this with certainty if this is what you're trying to get at (no, you cannot rely 100% on food inspection). Now I can ask you the same - would you actually serve some loved ones store-bought sausages or canned food? Or would you really throw it out? Isn't the question silly?

 

Now if you sauté the potatoes or boil them again, plus if you actually roast/braise it with the meat, even if they were contaminated with botulin, it will have been denatured by the time it's done, the cells dead and the spores, if not destroyed, won't grow into adult bacteria because the very low pH in you stomach makes this impossible.

 

Plus, we actually don't know if the potatoes were infected at all and most probably were not. The cases of botulism from potatoes were from baked potatoes left in the foil for too long, not boiled potatoes. I assume he boiled them peeled and sliced and then strained them. Doesn't sound like an environment where Clostridium species can reproduce and metabolize.

post #11 of 13
Quote:

even if they were contaminated with botulin, it will have been denatured by the time it's done, the cells dead and the spores, if not destroyed, won't grow into adult bacteria because the very low pH in you stomach makes this impossible.

Even if they were..............? hummmmm

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slayertplsko View Post


I'm not making it up.

 

''Unlike the staphylococcal enterotoxins and heat-stable toxins of other foodborne pathogens, the botulinal toxins are heat sensitive and may be destroyed by heating at 80◦C (176◦F) for 10 minutes, or boiling temperatures for a few minutes.''

 

It's right there, in Modern Food Microbiology, 7th ed., page 581, black on white. It's a chemical process called denaturation and it is the same thing that allows tough cuts to become tender by long braising, by denaturation of collagen.

 

I concede, eat up!

post #13 of 13

My ex wife wanted to denature me

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