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What to do with lots of leftover turkey?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

any ideas?

post #2 of 24

Turkey Reubens

post #3 of 24

Alfredo with turkey, a la king , caccattorre, turkey salad, croquettes, tettrazzinni, merengo, and on and on, use your imagination.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 24

Beyond the traditional ideas above, you can take them mexican in interesting ways with a pipian sauce and I also make tamales and freeze them for later eating.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 24

No one on my my list of Turkey leftovers is Turkey Soup 

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

Reply
post #6 of 24

hash, pot pies, po boys, turkey and dumplings

post #7 of 24

Turkey ravioli.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #8 of 24

Pot pies are good for leftovers too as you can use up gravy too. I usually do individual ramekin pot pies. This way I can freeze them and send them with my wife for lunches when she wants one.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #9 of 24

Monte Cristo sandwiches

Stir fry

Croquettes

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 24

Beside sandwiches, I'd go for "retro" croquettes... like diner food.  Don't have a recipe, but if I had leftovers, would be looking for one.

post #11 of 24

Posted by thatchairlady View Post

Beside sandwiches, I'd go for "retro" croquettes... like diner food.  Don't have a recipe, but if I had leftovers, would be looking for one.

 

With a few exceptions, making croquettes is more of a very easily adaptable sequence of techniques than hundreds of distinct recipes, each based on a different "filling."  If you (and/or other CT readers) are interested, I'll write a fairly comprehensive (and hopefully comprehensible) post. 

 

BDL

post #12 of 24

Go for it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

Posted by thatchairlady View Post

 

With a few exceptions, making croquettes is more of a very easily adaptable sequence of techniques than hundreds of distinct recipes, each based on a different "filling."  If you (and/or other CT readers) are interested, I'll write a fairly comprehensive (and hopefully comprehensible) post. 

 

BDL

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #13 of 24

I was only feeding myself this year so I made a small 11 pound bird. I like the dark meat so that was mostly eaten right away. I cut the breasts off and froze them separately for slicing for sandwiches. As mentioned turkey clubs (tonights menu to use the last of the non-frozen meat), and plain ole turkey on whole wheat with mayo and salt works for me. One thing different I have done in the past is use some of it for chimichanga filling, reheat with chili powder, cumin, mexican oregano and shred.

post #14 of 24
This year the day after Thanksgiving we did King Ranch Turkey Casserole, similar to King Ranch Chicken but used Turkey. It turned out pretty good.
post #15 of 24

One of best croquettes recipes I have used  was in old Joy of Cooking cookbook.Only thing I do different is The shape and I use chives & Panko crumbs.., and I fine grind some skin into mix to.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #16 of 24

I was at the market today looking for turkey parts to cook.  My wife and I had dinner at Cindy's house, her Cindy was in Salt Lake City, mine was in Phoenix.

 

No leftovers, I didn't even come close to getting my holiday turkey fix.  The one store I checked didn't have the half turkey breast I was hoping for, ended up doing pot stickers and beef & broccoli.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

Posted by thatchairlady View Post

 

With a few exceptions, making croquettes is more of a very easily adaptable sequence of techniques than hundreds of distinct recipes, each based on a different "filling."  If you (and/or other CT readers) are interested, I'll write a fairly comprehensive (and hopefully comprehensible) post. 

 

BDL

I'm always interested, thanks in advance!

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #18 of 24

if you have a breast left over, cube it then rehydrate the cubes in a sieve over boiling water.Make a spicy curry base gravy and reheat the plumped up cubes in that.

nb. add lots of fresh cracked black pepper to the gravy so its good and hot, this then purges your system of all that bland food you have eaten.

nnb put some toilet rolls in the fridge and take out as required.

post #19 of 24

In a pan sautee some chopped leeks and sliced mushrooms in butter until soft.  Deglaze with vermouth.  Add a cup of cream and the juice of half a lemon. Lots of pepper. Throw in some chopped parsley as well and then stir in some chopped up turkey just to warm through.  Serve over rice.  A very quick stroganoff.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #20 of 24

Chamenois style turkey soup.

 

Turkey, mushrooms and cream

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #21 of 24

After too many meals of turkey and dressing I was ready for something different flavor wise. I made a strong stock with the bones and scraps and made a hot and sour soup. It was refreshing change for the palate. I mostly winged it using ingredients I had on hand, but did buy some pork rather than using turkey again. I need to write it up anyway if anyone wants the ingredient list. 

post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by salparadise View Post

After too many meals of turkey and dressing I was ready for something different flavor wise. I made a strong stock with the bones and scraps and made a hot and sour soup. It was refreshing change for the palate. I mostly winged it using ingredients I had on hand, but did buy some pork rather than using turkey again. I need to write it up anyway if anyone wants the ingredient list. 

I'd be interested to know it.

post #23 of 24

Let's see. I did a day of leftovers, then soup, then tamales, then pot pies.. I think today it's time for a turkey and brocolli noodle casserole.  I think that will use it all up finally, except the tamales and pot pies in the freezer.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by vonshu View Post

I'd be interested to know it.

 

Vonshu, here ya go... this came together surprisingly well.

 

 

6 quarts of turkey stock

2 boneless pork chops, cut into thin strips

1/4 head of cabbage, shredded as needed

1 can bamboo shoots (or more)

2/3 cup rice

8 oz portobello mushrooms (or shiitake)

6 hot-sweet cherry peppers, minced

3 jalapeno peppers, minced

3 green onions, chopped

2 shallots, chopped

6 cloves garlic, minced

2 limes, juiced

1/4 cup white vinegar

1/4 cup soy sauce

2-3 tblsp sesame seed oil

1/2 cup madeira

4 tblsp olive oil (or whatever, for med high heat)

salt and pepper to taste

 

Brown mushrooms in butter in a dutch oven on medium high and remove. Then add some oil and brown pork strips. Add hot peppers, green onions, shallots, garlic and cook 3-4 minutes. Deglaze with lime juice and madeira (using wooden spoon). Add sesame seed oil and heat, return mushroom to pot, then add the stock and bring to simmer. Add rice, soy sauce, vinegar and bamboo shoots and simmer 15-20 minutes until rice is cooked. Shave 1/4 head cabbage and add to soup. Cook 3-4 minutes until cabbage begins to soften a bit. Use all the cabbage each time and add more when reheating next time.

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