or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Standup Mixers

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I've had Heavy Duty KA Mixer for 17 years but want one with a bigger capacity and stronger motor. I am looking at the KS Professional 600 series. I mostly do cakes, icings, cookies, but also want it strong enough for occassional bread doughs.

Anyone know about the KAPro 600 series?

Is the gear box still plastic or are they all metal now?

And also, is it noisier than your average mixer?

Should I even consider buying a factory refurbished one?

post #2 of 13

At ebay you can get a real Hobart 5 qt mixer (Model N50) with all attachments for around $500 and in great shape.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

I have a 5 QT right now.  The motor is not as strong as the Professional series, but I do want to upgrade not only the motor but the capacity so I am looking at at least the 6 QT.  But I have read so many mixed reviews...that they are very noisy for one thing.  Was hoping somone could chime in and give me their opinion....

post #4 of 13

My KA Pro 6qt mixer broke just before the one year warranty expired.  After exchanging it for a brand new one at the store, the new one smoked upon startup.  Got another new one, it ran fine for the test run.  It was sold right away to an acquaintance who's had no trouble with it.

 

Get the used Hobart N50 for they're built like a tank and offer a real three speed transmission.  Trust me on this one, especially if you're a pro pastry chef.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 13

Kitchen Aid 600 has had all metal gear boxes for years.  They're good machines, and are always available for big discounts.  I think the best reasons to choose a KA over its closest competitors are price and attachments.  That is, if you already have a few KA attachments you won't want to abandon them, and/or if you have your heart set on and absolutely cannot live with particular KA attachments. 

 

We've had one for about two years now we got to replace an older 6qt KA which died from stripped gears, and which itself was bought to replace an old KA from the late eighties which went to my ex as part of her part of the community property and is still going strong for my daughter.   I like the new one just fine, and so far -- knock wood -- no problems.  Since the last machine broke, I got in the habit of doing bread mixing and kneading by hand and continue to do so because I enjoy it.  In any case, my expensive collection of KA attachments: grinder/sausage stuffer, grater set, pasta rollers, etc., fits. 

 

The Hobart is very nice, takes KA attachments and has certainly proven its durability over the years,  but considering its price and limited capacity, loyalty to it may not make as much sense as it did many years ago.  I just checked ebay and the current asking price for a used N50 in good shape was $789.  They're listed for around $2200 new, but I think you can get one for less if you look around. 

 

FWIW, I know someone who did his own rebuild on a broken N50 and found the process relatively simple and inexpensive.  I wouldn't take on the challenge myself, but you may like fooling around with appliances.

 

If you make a lot of bread or cookies, are willing to spend the big bucks, want something heavy duty, and want true two and three loaf capacity, the top-down gear drive machines like the KA, Hobart, Cuisinart, Viking, etc., have been somewhat superseded by bottom-up belt drive machines like the Electrolux and Bosch.  

 

The top of the heap is the Electrolux made Verona / Magic Mill Assistent DLX.  They're by far the best stand mixers for bread baking, cookie dough and other heavy duty tasks; have 7.4qt capacities, do all the light duty stuff extremely well (although they look pretty odd doing it), and have a good range of attachments (and speaking of looking odd, have to be stood on their side to operate the attachments).   Odd ducks, but they work extremely well and last a long time.  The price ranges from just under $700 (Pleasant Hill) for white, and just under $800 for most other colors. 

 

I don't know how meaningful it is, but... if my wife hadn't purchased our current KA, I would have bought an Assistent and to hell with the old KA attachments.

 

If you're not going to be doing that much heavy duty mixing, go for the KitchenAid 600.  Get it from someplace like BB&B or SLT which is better than good with guarantees and get an extended warranty going beyond the already very good standard "two year 'hassle free' guarantee," so you'll have some extra piece of mind. 

 

Some other machines to consider are the Hamilton Beach CPM 700, the 7qt Cuisinart and the 7qt Viking.  To my mind -- based on reviews and other online information -- they're all more or less fungible as mixers with the new 7qt KA.

 

Did you find this more helpful than confusing? 

BDL

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

Yes, thank you.  I don't plan on doing much bread so I don't think the motor will burn up on me any time soon.  I was concerned about how noisy I hear people say it is.  But I might just bite the bullet and get one, today being Cyber Monday and all....and I will definitely look into the extended warranty.   Thank you for the advice.

post #7 of 13

Hi,

 

I just like to bake at home, but I had a Kitchen Aid and hated it, so I sold it and am debating between a Bosch and Electrolux.  I love to make cookies and yeast breads but also want to be able to make a single batch of brownies or a cake occasionally.  How do the Bosch and Electrolux perform at these tasks?  Is the Bosch really harder to clean?  How hard is it to learn how to use the Electrolux?  Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

post #8 of 13

I had my KS for 10 years and it was handed down to me by my mom when I got married. It finally gave up last month and I looked at the 600 pro ones but they were a little out of my budget. I found a great website that reviewed them and found that the 600 pro would not be good for the jobs I needed and they recommeded the mid-grade KA Artisan series. I love it!! And it kneads the dough for my bagels without a problem. Highly recommend. Here's the link for the site I used when looking for a replacement KA  and they even told me where to get it at a very good price.

www.ROBOTKITCHENAIDSTANDMIXER.COM.. Hope you find the right one for you.  Lisa

post #9 of 13
Hope you don't mind a new question on this -- I am a home cook and my KA 610 Pro just died. I mainly used it for smal batch pasta (2.25 cups and 3 eggs), single loaves f rustic bread (16.5 ozs flour and 1.3 cups water), and infrequenty a very wet pizza bianca that needs about ten minutes at high speep (according to the recipe). DLX and Bosch seem not well sited to small batches, and neither take KA pasta attachments which I want to us over rhe exruder type. Can I get your view on (1) a five quart for my purposes) and (2) a Hobart N50 v. Globe SP5? Thanks
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Niccolo Donzell View Post

... Can I get your view on (1) a five quart for my purposes) and (2) a Hobart N50 v. Globe SP5? Thanks

 

Although I've never used a Hobart N50 it would be my first choice for a home mixer because it is a real production, industrial mixer build like a brick ********** and a manual three speed transmission to boot. No analog control here.   And I've heard that it accepts attachments made for the KA's as well.  I've seen the Hobart N50 in great shape go for around $500 at ebay plus substantial s&h.  And THAT'S where I'd go if I were in the market for a mixer - having done research over the past 12 years on this matter.  Get a Hobart and you'll cry only once.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #11 of 13
Thank you. Niccolo
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty baker View Post

Hi,

 

I just like to bake at home, but I had a Kitchen Aid and hated it, so I sold it and am debating between a Bosch and Electrolux.  I love to make cookies and yeast breads but also want to be able to make a single batch of brownies or a cake occasionally.  How do the Bosch and Electrolux perform at these tasks?  Is the Bosch really harder to clean?  How hard is it to learn how to use the Electrolux?  Any advice would be greatly appreciated!


lefty, why did you hate your ka? (sorry, broken thumb)

post #13 of 13

In reading BDL's comments posted elsewhere, it seems that the Electrolux is the one to get for kneading doughs.  Better design than the typical J-hook that allows the dough to climb up and not get kneaded enough.


Edited by kokopuffs - 3/11/13 at 3:08am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Equipment Reviews