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Collapsing whipped cream

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I keep chocolate mousse in ramekins a chilled glass cabinet, but the blob of whipped cream on top goes runny within minutes. The mousse was completely chilled before I piped the cream on. Any tricks how to avoid this?

 

Cheers,

Recky

post #2 of 11

I'm not certain but I think I read that whipped cream will hold much longer if whipped with some confectioners (powdered) sugar.
 

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #3 of 11

Within minutes?  Sounds like it hasnt been whipped enough.  Regardless, if you plan on keeping the cream stabilized, powdered sugar will work, as will milk powder.  If you want to get fancy add warm gelatin or agar agar to the cream while whipping.

post #4 of 11

Use cream stabilizer.  There are many available.  In fact, some creams already come with a modified food starch added already.  It's annoying but I guess that's what most people do with cream. They whip it.

post #5 of 11

Don't need no stinkin' stabilizer.

 

Take your whipping bowl and whisk and stick them in the freezer for 20 mins--or even beter, overnight.

 

Whip your cream very slowly, don't put the mixer on "high" but rather slow. It will take longer to whip, but the cream will stay firm much longer.

 

 

Obviously, the higher the fat content, the better the cream will stay whipped.  Most run-of-the-mill creams are 33% with added stabilizers. If you can find 36% go for it.

 

Icing sugar is only added if you want to freeze the whipped cream.  When added, the cream won't freeze solid and will thaw easily.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #6 of 11

 i'm not sure what kind of food establishment you have recky and i guess i'm just curious as to why you have the whipped cream on the mousse in the first place...is it a display case or a 'gourmet to go' self serve case?  if there is an order for one can your staff pipe on the cream to order....if it's in a display case even if a refrigerated one, how hot are the lights in it? and not being covered in the case would also deteriorate the cream i would think....my guess also is that the cream was just not whipped stiff enough...

 

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #7 of 11
Quote:

Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

 

 Most run-of-the-mill creams are 33% with added stabilizers. If you can find 36% go for it.

 

I thought by law heavy cream had to have 36%?

post #8 of 11

depends on where you live.... 

 

here in Canada we don't have so many laws

 

cream isn't a product it comes out of cows~!

 

it varies in %

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #9 of 11

Meh, you can whip cream with a fat content of 25%--it won't hold for very long, but you can whip it.

 

I don't know who sets rules for the dairies.  I know that tthe Swiss take thier dairy very seriously and no one can sell "whipping cream"
 with a f/c of under 36%, cooking butter @82% and table butter @84%.

 

Here in Vancouver we've got all kinds of names for cream  @10% : Half and half, creamo, coffee cream, cereal cream.  Most diaries lable thier stuff @33% as "whipping cream" whch I am sure exempts them from the labeling requirements of "heavy cream"

 

The stuff in the cans with Nitrous oxide is labled as 20% with a bunch of stabilzers and sugar.  There's also "light" whipping cream in cans @ 12%, but I've never been brave enough to actually buy a can and see what comes out of it.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hi,

thanks a lot for all your replies! To clarify a few points:

 

My desserts live in a chilled display case. I'm currently trying to increase dessert sales, and what people see they are more likely to buy.

 

Here in Germany, for some ludicrous reason that completely eludes me, you cannot buy what is widely classed as "double cream" (around 38% fat in the U.K. for instance). The "whipping cream" here has a fat content of usually just below 30% (no stabilisers).

I use an espuma to produce the small amounts of whipped cream I need and it always comes out fully whipped. However, it simply doesn't last very long in this state.

 

I guess I will have to pipe it on to order...

 

Thanks again

Recky
 

post #11 of 11

by an espuma, do you mean a whipping cannister such as ISI or Whip-It that uses nitrous oxide chargers? i buy 40% heavy cream, and i add a bit of powdered sugar to the cannister for stiffness and staying power...might be worth a shot to try it

 

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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