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What can I do to improve on this.

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hey guys, so I made a vanilla panna cotta with a mango coulis (Can't really call it a coulis because all I did was blitz up 3 mangoes), and a biscuit crumble on top.

How could I improve on presentation? More panna cotta? More mango? More biscuit? The recipe I used was by Gary Mehigan. I will post the recipe if requested.

post #2 of 15

How about layering  your flavors ?

 

A thin layer of mango puree  on bottom, mixture, midway add another layer of mango, add mixture. Finish top with  slice of mango & a medley of  fresh berries

 

Take that biscuit crumble and toss it in a pan, add some icing sugar and almond slices and quickly flip your hot pan around, you want to coat everything to get a good crunch. Let cool , then sprinkle on top of dessert.

 

Another thought: use a combination of mango gelée , panna cotta , then puree (three textures on the tongue )

 

some ideas from net: this panna cotta is finished with a mix of kiwi and strawberry. A little touch of red will make it pop.

 

700

700 Layered look.

700Notice here they layered the top with gelee or you can even use a puree, small cubes of mango , then piped coconut cream on top & mint leaf.

 

These are just a few ideas....

 

Petals.

 

 

 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Sounds like a good idea. I'll have to wait a bit on the panna cotta experimenting, but tomorrow I will be rising bright and early to make a lemon curd kind of cheese cake mixture to do in the same glasses. would a berry coulis go well with this? or should I just stick with the lemon flavours? and to mix it up a bit, should I (as said above) sprinkle the biscuit base on top, or actually press it at the bottom?
post #4 of 15

A berry coulis goes pretty much with everything.

 

If you press the cookie mixture at the bottom, add filling, top it with a little whipped cream, it will end up being "like" a mini lemon cheesecake, nice Nathan, a well composed dessert.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
The only thing I am thinking is that if I press the biscuit into the bottom of the glass, it will be insanely annoying to actually eat it from the glass, but I guess I can always make a test run, and the whipping cream I would need to pipe on fresh, wouldn't I? Because from what I've heard it doesn't last long in the fridge.
post #6 of 15

You could serve it with a cookie?

post #7 of 15

It looks good but something about the proportion doesn't look right.  Either the glass is too tall or there's not enough panna cotta in it.  It should come up to more than halfway in the glass otherwise we're thinking "is it half full, or half empty... either way give me more."

 

To be more seasonal I'd probably not use mangos at this time of year, but at least add some clementine juice to your coulis and perhaps a few sprinkles of pommegranate seeds as garnish.  Also, for more contrast use gingerbread cookie crumble instead of biscuit?  I don't know, just thinking out loud since I look for the season to be reflected in dessert.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Only reason I used mango in it, is because my mum got 13 free mango's from her work, and she wanted me to use some of them, so I made the mango coulis. I agree, now I have looked back at the dish, there needs to be more. This is probably because I made 5 (1 not pictured, due to already being eaten), when the recipe was for 4 of them. Next round, I will only be making 4, so they will be bigger and more appealing. To be honest, I will do anything to avoid using ginger in sweet foods, I just find the flavour not appealing, although everyone else in my family love it. Next time I make this dessert, I will be attempting my first fine dining style plating of it, since I have acquired dariole moulds, so the panna cotta will be on the plate, will be posting a picture of it in the next week when I have a chance to make it.

Thank you for your advice & insight guys, it is very appreciated!
post #9 of 15

Hey Nat,

took my last panna cotta into a pan tres leches if you will, my V anyway. Made a scone of sorts with some freeze dried black berries, sliced the scone into thin slices, layer them cut sides up, poured the PC onto the cake layer before it set, (uno) also you can let it set and spread it later if you like.

next spread blue berry whipped cream, thin, (dos)

piped on Dulce de leche as a lace (tres)

finished with fresh raspberry puree with a little gelatin to let it hold.  

 

Served it as tres leches with tres frutas

 

everyone seemed to enjoy it, rather quickly might add

 

lookaround.gif

 

Cheers,

 

 

EDG

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

Reply
post #10 of 15

No one can give you serious feedback on improving the taste and/or texture of your panna cotta and/or your mango coulis because you didn't describe them.  If you want help you need to give some description of what you did to make the dish and how it turned out.  Recipes are helpful, especially if you're a recipe driven cook or are unsure if the problems are the result of the recipe or your own technique; however, they're not always necessary.

 

Koukouvagia is right about the size of the glass.  The largest problem with your presentation by far was that the glass was too way too small for the portion.  As a rule of thumb, you can put a small dessert on a big plate but not in a big glass; and in a wide diameter bowl, but not in one of small diameter.  Your guests should not have to start eating their sweet by digging for it. 

 

Assuming you didn't have cocktail or dessert glasses of the right side, panna cotta should be stiff enough to hold its shape on a plate (or in a large bowl).  If you did that, the most typical (and admittedly somewhat dated) way to plate would have been on top of a puddle of the coulis. 

 

The solutions to the plating problem are so obvious that your service leads to the following questions:  What do you mean by describing yourself as a "culinary student?" Are you cooking at home, taking cooking in a secondary school, at a post-secondary professional culinary school, or some combination? 

 

I ask because if I'm going to give you advice, I'd like to pitch it to the right level and yours seems -- no criticism intended -- both naive and opinionated. 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 12/1/12 at 10:12am
post #11 of 15

nathan,

 as to your lemon curd dessert....i just happened to make this yesterday for a catering function as well as a dessert special for the restaurant...perhaps it can help in some way....'Lemon Mousse with Fresh Berries'. served in a martini glass...simple, elegant, rich yet light. it goes basically like this.... folded whipped cream into lemon curd, spooned fresh berry mix(blackberries, strawberries & blueberries lightly tossed with sugar) into bottom of the glass, piped (without a tip, because it looks more flowing) lemon mousse on top of the berries,then a small spoonful of berry mix, and another small piping of lemon mousse on top...garnish was 2 fresh raspberries, a very small mint sprig and served with a rolled cookie wafer.     the lemon mousse for this dessert actually holds up for a day quite well.

good luck.....

 

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hey BDL, I am a culinary student in the sense that a Head Chef has taken me on as an apprentice, so basically I work in his restaurant 4 days a week, and learn from him, then one day a week I study in a college, 3 years later I gain my degree and become a commis chef, I'm not just taking a course on cooking, I plan on becoming qualified as a chef.

And as I've said above, the reason I didn't do the panna cotta's onto a plate is because I didn't have the plastic dariole moulds to be able to do it, now I do, which will mean I can get used to producing nice looking dishes.
Panna Cotta Recipe (Click to show)
Ingredients:
2 cups (500ml) thickened cream
1 vanilla pod, split
60g caster sugar
1 1/2 leaves titanium-strength gelatine

Method:
Place the cream, vanilla and sugar in a saucepan and bring to the boil, then remove from heat. Meanwhile, soak the gelatine leaves in cold water until soft. Squeeze the leaves, then stir through hot cream mixture until dissolved. Strain the panna cotta mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a heatproof jug.
Pour one-sixth of the cream mixture into each mould, then leave to set in the fridge for at least 6 hours or overnight.
post #13 of 15

Do we really have to check people's credentials before we can give culinary advice on cheftalk?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #14 of 15

 Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Do we really have to check people's credentials before we can give culinary advice on cheftalk?

No.  I explained why I asked. 

 

BDL

post #15 of 15

Nathan - BDL has a point about description.  Every craft, trade, art form, etc has a specific nomenclature.  It lets professionals describe in a common language what they are doing and it puts everyone on the same page regardless of distance.  I don't know all the terminology of professional cooks as I am not one.  I am well versed in the languages associated with my profession and can communicate with other professionals about solving problems.  You should learn as much as you can and that way you'll be able to communicate what your are experiencing to other cooks.  I can get a sense of the taste and texture of something if it is described well.  Your profession has a language - learn it and you might find that doors open a little easier for you.

 

Best of luck -

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