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Better Buttermilk substitute?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Greetings everyone.

 

I would like to know your opinion on which buttermilk substitute would work better in making cakes, the one that calls for an acid and milk or the one that comes out from overwhipping your heavycream?

 

I came from Southeast Asia where the only buttermilk available is the powdered type. I tried reconstituting it but the results were not good. I hope someone could give me an advice.

 

Thank you.

 

Vera


Edited by Vera Cresta - 12/4/12 at 7:09pm

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Information comprehended w/o testing and validation is just opinion.

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Information w/o testing and validation is just data.

Information comprehended w/o testing and validation is just opinion.

INFORMATION COMPREHENDED WITH TESTING AND VALIDATION IS KNOWLEDGE.

I don't just read/write recipes and try them out; I study, analyze, test, validate and revalidate them. :)

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post #2 of 11

I would think that it would be more economical to use acidified milk although in theory both should work equally well.

post #3 of 11

Definitely use the acidified milk for modern recipes.  The liquid from making butter used to be the more common item, but will act differently in a modern recipe that calls for buttermilk.

Purchased buttermilk is thick and adds a lot of moisture to baked goods.  It is also acidic enough to work with baking soda.

 

The liquid from making butter is quite thin and sweet and might not provide satisfactory results.

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you for replying Laurenlulu and Chef Jellly.
 

Information w/o testing and validation is just data.

Information comprehended w/o testing and validation is just opinion.

INFORMATION COMPREHENDED WITH TESTING AND VALIDATION IS KNOWLEDGE.

I don't just read/write recipes and try them out; I study, analyze, test, validate and revalidate them. :)

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Information w/o testing and validation is just data.

Information comprehended w/o testing and validation is just opinion.

INFORMATION COMPREHENDED WITH TESTING AND VALIDATION IS KNOWLEDGE.

I don't just read/write recipes and try them out; I study, analyze, test, validate and revalidate them. :)

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post #5 of 11

... or try this:  put the right amount of dry buttermilk in with your dry ingredients, and add the right amount of water to the wet ingredients.  Dry buttermilk powder was not intended to be reconsituted into liquid buttermilk directly.

 

From the source:

 

http://sacofoods.com/products/view/cultured-buttermilk

 

That is a very good product for baking!

post #6 of 11

I would use the acid and milk, more economical. When I was in pastry school we ran out of buttermilk and we used lemon juice and milk, worked out great.

post #7 of 11
There is no buttermilk where i am either.
How much acid would you use per litre of milk?
And what type of acid? I would assume lemon juice¡

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post #8 of 11

Hi guys...

 

What I do is the following recipe:

1 Cup whole milk

1 Tablespoon white vinegar.

Stir and let it sit for a few minutes. That's it, instant buttermilk

 

I've used this recipe for fried chicken and it works great, I don't know how it may turn for baking,but since  the recipe is easy and you'll not waste too much if it doesn't give you the results that you're looking for, It may worths a try.

Good luck.

 

Luis

post #9 of 11

I agree with most of the comments and recommend the acidified version. In a pinch, if I don't have any fresh lemons,  I've also squeezed some Grapefruit juice. You have to use a tad bit more (about 25% because it is not quite as acidic as lemons. So if you normally would use 1 T of lemon juice you would use 1 T + slightly less than 1 tsp.

 

I live in an area that does not have many products on the shelves as well. Lots of improvisation to get some things done.

post #10 of 11

It will work fine as will lemon juice.  I prefer touse the following day as it can cure and whole mass be even.

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post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

thank you so much for the inputs... I'm already using the acid-milk mixture and it works great. :)

Information w/o testing and validation is just data.

Information comprehended w/o testing and validation is just opinion.

INFORMATION COMPREHENDED WITH TESTING AND VALIDATION IS KNOWLEDGE.

I don't just read/write recipes and try them out; I study, analyze, test, validate and revalidate them. :)

Reply

Information w/o testing and validation is just data.

Information comprehended w/o testing and validation is just opinion.

INFORMATION COMPREHENDED WITH TESTING AND VALIDATION IS KNOWLEDGE.

I don't just read/write recipes and try them out; I study, analyze, test, validate and revalidate them. :)

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