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Problems with blind baking a quiche crust - Page 3

post #61 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kippers View Post

Koko if you watch this vid your questions will be answered 

Do pork pies take 4 days to make in every single pie shop? :O lol

post #62 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmbai90 View Post

The problem is your supposed to make the bottom crust thicker so it doesn't drip through like that, my cooking lecturer at college taught me that one and it works every time, don't make it thin as you would with the top of a pie, i would also review how much fat you put into making the crust but yes use the rubbing method as people have said to make sure all of it is rubbed into the flour. Also when you oil the bottom if you use cooking oil never do that because all it does is dries up the bottom and makes the foil stick to it, grease it with a nice amount of butter but not too much but enough to know it won't stick to it, don't listen to people that say use oil to grease it, you only do that for certain types of things like when you make pizza but NEVER with many things, anything like cakes, muffins, cheese cakes, cookies, pies and pastries you should never use oil.

I agree with the others too freeze everything before hand, just put everything in and try to cut everything as small as possible, i keep over working pastry because my hands are very warm so when rubbing i would cut all the lard and butter very small otherwise it will take longer to rub in and it will just over work, the color needs to be a pale brown color not a very dark brown color, i'm going to start cutting the fats really small myself really the next time i make pie dough.

Ummm, a bit of butter rubbed into the bottom of the quiche mold along with a dough rolled out thicker - at the bottom.  Will definitely try that one along with less fat tomorrow and will let y'all know.

 

THANKS ALL AND MERRY....

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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-T

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post #63 of 87

How did it go? i hope it turned out better :)

post #64 of 87
Thread Starter 

Much better. Will list the modified recipe and procedure for making the dough/crust only.

 

2C White Lily Bread flour (4g protein per serving)

2 OZ unsalted butter

>2 OZ lard

4-6 TBS ice water

1 tsp salt

 

  1. Flour and salt mixed in mixing bowl.
  2. Cold butter cut to the size of approx 1 cm cubes and placed into dry ingredients
  3. Lard cut to approx 1 cm cubes and placed into dry ingredients
  4. Mixture covered and frozen for one hour
  5. Removed from the freezer, the fat was squished flat while working (incorporating) flour into the fat
  6. Once fat was reduced to the size of peas, ICE water added 2 TBS at a time until the mixture stuck together while NOT being sticky.
  7. Then fraisage:  I took the heel of my hand and pressed a 2 inch section of the ball of dough FLAT.  The same repeated for each 2 inch section until none remained. 
  8. Using a dough scraper, the flakey mixture was quickly gathered into a ball, placed between some plastic wrap and quickly flattened into a disc.
  9. Some frank pieces of fat were noted, measuring about 1cm square.
  10. The dough was refrigerated for one hour prior to rolling.
  11. After one hour of refrigerated rest, the dough was placed onto a canvas cloth dusted with bread flour and rolled out while being dusted occasionally.
  12. It was placed into a frozen quiche mold made by Fat Daddio's, pricked with a fork and frozen for an hour at least.
  13. Prior to placing in the oven the dough was brushed with egg white that was beaten frothy, short of meringue.
  14. The mold was then placed onto a preheated baking stone and prebaked 15 minutes at 425F and then removed from the oven in order to receive the filling

 

This recipe produced a much flakier dough but seemed a tiny bit soggy where it made contact with the filling.  And this time there was neither leakage of either filling nor fat.

Whew!

 

EDIT: when rolling out the dough the portion of the dough that serves as the 'bottom' was rolled out thick, around an eighth of an inch thick.


Edited by kokopuffs - 1/8/13 at 7:53pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #65 of 87

NICE ONE! :D i guess that's why my lecturer never even lets us use a food proccesor lol to make sure the fat is incoperated right she is a good teacher really, i would rather like to try using a food proccesor with sharp blades , like my mini one spins in a circle and the blade pretty much shreds anything to crumbs but not big enough to make dough for pies, it's alright for 100g of chocolate though or herbs, i feel like ones that just pulses don't really make the same effect as ones with the spinny blade in the middle, for sure the best type of proccesor to have.  What kind of pie did you make? the pastry would also be flaky according to what type of flour you use, i just use plane flour at college to make short crust pastry which makes a much sturdy pastry but i can tell your trying to be a bit more healthy with the pie, i feel bad when making the pies at college because my lecturer makes us add salt in pretty much everything, the pastry and the filling too and then they put more on thinking there is non in it :\, i usually don't add any salt in the filling but tell my lecturer i did lmao, i wanna stop killing people.

post #66 of 87

emmbai90, if you do a little research you will discover that salt (NaCl) is an essential nutrient. As with almost everything, too much may be hazardous to your health. Conversely, too little may also be hazardous to your health.

 

Between the threshold of too little and too much, which happens to be a fairly wide range, a large majority of humans find that salt improves the eating experience by enhancing a variety of flavors in addition to being an essential component for preservation of a wide range of food products.

 

Reducing or eliminating salt is not automatically "good" nor is adding salt necessarily "bad". On the other hand, "balance" is almost universally good while imbalance is almost universally bad.
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #67 of 87

Yeh that's true, i wish they put signs up though saying salt is already in it, the pies are already salty from the cheese or stock cubes and gravy granulates then people eating them put more salt on top, it's one of those things that make me cringe so bad but i can't just come out and say that lol, i never put salt on pie or cheesy things as i know there is probably like 1 - 3 tea spoons of salt in the whole thing total especially pies you've added salt, granulates and stock cubes.

post #68 of 87

Hi,

I always blind bake.

You often see even professional chefs roll out their dough, put it in the mould and pour in whatever filling.

This just makes for a soggy uncooked base. Horrible!!!

1. Which ever pastry I am making, savoury, or sweet, no matter, shape it into a disc and rest it in the fridge for at least one hour, wrapped in cling film.

(The secret with most pastries is to work it as little as possible. As soon as it comes together, STOP! It takes seconds only.) 

2. I then roll out the cold dough, on a VERY lightly dusted surface. Keep turning it gently as you roll to make sure it does not stick.

Once it is roughly the right size, I cover it with baking paper. Turn it over and cover the bottom side with baking paper as well.

Back in the fridge for at least an hour on a flat baking sheet. You can even put it in the freezer for 15 minutes to speed up the process.

3. Now take out your cold disc, remove the baking paper from one side, let it soften up for a minute or two (to avoid cracks), and then when it is pliable, gently fold it into your mould or ring.

Really try to get the pastry down into the edges of your mould and up the sides, filling every part of it. Remove the baking paper and let the excess pastry flow over the edge of the mould, using your rolling pin all around the edge of the mould to cut away. (Keep those rolled out off cuts to make leaves, or hearts etc to decorate.)

4. Now put your mould back in the fridge for a good hour. (I do all this the day before and leave the filled mould in the fridge all night, but, that's me!) The actual doing parts does not take long!

5. Heat up the oven to 175/180c, take out your cold pastry shell, make a series of holes in the base with a fork, cover the base and sides tightly with silver foil and bake.

(No need to oil the foil, Butter will automatically seep out as the base cooks!)

Because your pastry shell is very cold, it will not shrink very much.

6. After 12 or 15 minutes, open the oven and gently remove the silver foil leaving the base exposed for another 10 minutes or so, to finish cooking.

If you want the base for a cold filling leave it to cook until golden.

7. Remove from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool.

8. After about five minutes cooling, beat half an egg white and brush this onto the cooling base and sides of your shell. The egg white will cook and seal the base. Cold fillings will not be able to soak into the base, which will remain nice and crunchy. Equally, if the base is for a quiche, just pour the filling in and bake for 25/30 mins as usual. 

 

For perfect pastries every time, you can Google: Raymond Blanc, or Michel Roux senior, or Michel Roux junior, all French Michelin star chefs who have recipes on the net and who can be found on YouTube strutting their stuff. They are old school, using timeless classic recipes. If you follow their advice, you quite simply, can not go wrong.

One of my favourites is an Almond sweet paste for a Lemon, Lime and Basil cream recipe by Jacques Genin, one of Paris's star patissiers.

Google: Tarte au Citron de Genin, à la maison So Food So Good

 

     

     

 

 

 

    

 

PS Any clever clogs out there know how to manage the photos. They are the right way up in the file and then decide to turn sideways in the post. Just glad my pastry does not do the same!!!

post #69 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by black dog View Post...

Really try to get the pastry down into the edges of your mould and up the sides, filling every part of it. Remove the baking paper and let the excess pastry flow over the edge of the mould, using your rolling pin all around the edge of the mould to cut away. (Keep those rolled out off cuts to make leaves, or hearts etc to decorate.)

4. Now put your mould back in the fridge for a good hour. (I do all this the day before and leave the filled mould in the fridge all night, but, that's me!) The actual doing parts does not take long!

5. Heat up the oven to 175/180c, take out your cold pastry shell, make a series of holes in the base with a fork, cover the base and sides tightly with silver foil and bake.

(No need to oil the foil, Butter will automatically seep out as the base cooks!)

Because your pastry shell is very cold, it will not shrink very much....

 

When I bake a 9 incher, I always have, ready to load, smaller shells for the dough that's left over.

 

I've always had problems using foil, buttered and unbuttered, for lining the shell when blind baking.  It sticks no matter what, tearing the partially baked shell when it's removed.  There I've switched to using parchment paper to line my shells for blind baking.  Never had a sticking problem since I switched.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #70 of 87

Hi,

Not sure why you're having difficulties with the foil. I never do. The pastry shell should leak out some butter during cooking, making removal easier, and I tend to use foil because it's easy to make a snug fit around your shell, which in turn, stops the sides from dropping in.

Parchment paper is great, but I find it difficult to make a nice tight fit. One thing I do is take the outside of a similar size mould, but upside down, and wrap the paper around it until it is a good circle about the same size and shape. Then I fill the paper with old apricot seeds, or better still a pile of small coins.

However, when you come to remove this after 15 minutes initial cooking, you have to move the tart shell out of the oven and mess about with the very hot seeds or coins which can be a pain.

It's a matter of personal preference I guess. What ever works for you.

post #71 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by black dog View Post
 

Hi,

Not sure why you're having difficulties with the foil. I never do. The pastry shell should leak out some butter during cooking, making removal easier, and I tend to use foil because it's easy to make a snug fit around your shell, which in turn, stops the sides from dropping in.

Parchment paper is great, but I find it difficult to make a nice tight fit. One thing I do is take the outside of a similar size mould, but upside down, and wrap the paper around it until it is a good circle about the same size and shape. Then I fill the paper with old apricot seeds, or better still a pile of small coins.

However, when you come to remove this after 15 minutes initial cooking, you have to move the tart shell out of the oven and mess about with the very hot seeds or coins which can be a pain.

It's a matter of personal preference I guess. What ever works for you.


My shell leaks butter bigtime but that process is the key for a flakey crust; and, I place an additional piece of parchement underneath the mold, between the mold and the sheet pan that it sets in.  That way cleanup of the sheet pan is much quicker and easier, there's less butter to wash away in the sink.

 

And I'll give the foil another try for blind baking.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #72 of 87

For regular forms with sloped walls, I don't use weight filled foil or parchment "packages" to bake blind.

 

Instead of fighting gravity, I use gravity.

 

I line out the form as usual, than stack another matching form on top of it.  The dough is  now "sandwiched" in between two forms

 

Now place this upside down on a tray and bake as per  usual.

 

When cool, remove the top form.

 

Gravity will always pull  the dough down, use it to your advantage.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #73 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

For regular forms with sloped walls, I don't use weight filled foil or parchment "packages" to bake blind.

 

Instead of fighting gravity, I use gravity.

 

I line out the form as usual, than stack another matching form on top of it.  The dough is  now "sandwiched" in between two forms

 

Now place this upside down on a tray and bake as per  usual.

 

When cool, remove the top form.

 

Gravity will always pull  the dough down, use it to your advantage.


One of these days I'm gonna try your method, Foodpump.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #74 of 87

To kokopuffs

 

Here are my recommended Ecole Ritz Escoffier Paris, recipes for "Sweet" Pàte à Foncer, and "Savoury" Pàte Brisée, pastries. I have used them dozens of times and always had superb results. No cutting corners. Follow the ingredients and methods and you'll be a very happy chappy.

 

Pàte Brisée is generally used for Savoury tarts and Quiche etc Freezes well

It is usually made with water, but can be made with egg to advantage, as it will be more crumbly.

(If you are making a bigger tart, say 30cm, just increase all the ingredients by 1/3rd)

 

Ingredients for 250g of paste for a 20cm tart

125g flour type 55   (You can also experiment with a mix of 50% type 55 and 50% whole wheat flour type 80, or "all type 80 which makes really great quiches")

95g slightly softened unsalted butter cut in small pieces

30 to 40 ml v cold water or ½ a large egg lightly beaten

Pinch of salt

 

Method:

In a mixer: add all the ingredients except the water or egg.

Use a cold K beater to wizz the ingredients for a few seconds until they resemble crumbs.

Add the cold water, or lightly beaten egg, and wizz again for seconds only until you have a ball of paste. Stop the machine immediately.

The secret is to work the paste as little as possible. 

Make a ball, flatten slightly, wrap in film and rest in the fridge for at least one hour.

If the pastry rests in the fridge for more than one hour, let it warm a little for 5 minutes before rolling out.

 

By hand: Run your hands under cold water to get them cold and dry them well. Mix the flour and salt and quickly work the butter in with your finger tips to get a nice pile of crumbs.

Add the cold water, or egg and work as little as possible until it comes together.

Make a ball, flatten slightly, wrap in film and rest in the fridge for at least one hour.

If the pastry rests in the fridge for more than one hour, let it warm a little for 5 minutes before rolling out.

 

Pàte a Foncer is used for Patisserie (Sweet tarts)  Freezes well

 

Ingredients  for 250g of paste for a 20cm tart

125g  flour type 55 sieved

80g slightly softened unsalted butter cut in pieces

15g castor sugar

1/2 an egg lightly beaten

Pinch of salt

 

Method:

In a mixer  Use the same method as for Pàte Brisee.

 

By hand:

On a clean dry surface, quickly work the pieces of butter with your finger tips, little by little into the sieved flour, to obtain crumbs. Make a circle in the middle of the crumbs, (a fountain), and mix the salt, the sugar, and the egg together in the center. Now gently bring the flour in from the edges in a circular motion, until more or less incorporated.

Gently squash the resulting paste down between the palm of your hand and the work surface and push it away from you a couple of times to bring it together and incorporate.

Again the secret is to work the paste as little as possible.

Make a ball, flatten slightly, wrap in film and rest in the fridge for one at least hour.

If the pastry rests in the fridge for more than one hour, let it warm a little for 5 minutes before rolling out.

 

Rolling out for both types. Use as little extra flour as possible.

On a very lightly floured surface, take the flattened paste and roll out, turning regularly so that it does not stick.  Once it is the size you need, 2cm larger than the base and sides of the mould, brush off any excess flour and cover it on both sides with baking paper. Rest in the fridge one hour on a flat surface like a baking tray.

 

Rolling out

Remove from the fridge and allow to warm for a few minutes. When it is pliable, remove one side of the baking paper and gently fold the pastry in the mould. Gently lift the edge and using your other hand, bring the pastry to the edge and up the sides of the mould. Try to make sure it really fills the base and edges without stretching it. Remove the top baking paper, but keep it handy for the baking blind. Use a rolling pin on the edge of the mould cut the excess which can be used for mini tarts and barquettes. You can now use a fork to make a series of holes across the base, if desired.

I like to put the filled pastry mould back in the fridge to get really cold again. This really helps to stop shrinkage.

 

Baking blind

I really hate soggy bottoms (Unless I’m on the beach in Tortola!), so I always thoroughly bake the base blind, because, there is, to my way of thinking, nothing worse than doing all that work making great pastry and a beautiful filling and then ending up with a soggy undercooked tart base.

 

Heat the oven to 170c/180c  Now cover the very cold pastry case with the baking paper and fill with dry beans, (or you can use foil, It should not stick!) 

and very quickly put it in the oven.

 

Bake for 15 or so minutes and then remove the beans and baking paper, or foil.

 

Continue to bake until the base looks dry, or until the pastry is golden, as desired.

 

Take the base out of the oven and leave for 5 minutes on a rack to cool.

 

Sealing the base:

Beat half an egg white to a light mousse and brush it on the still hot pastry. It will cook and seal the base, ready for your filling.

Allow the pastry to cool completely before putting in your filling, if it is fruit, or a custard and fruit, or whatever. Make a light syrup, or melt some sort of appropriately flavoured jam to glaze the fruit and sear it under the grill before serving.

If you have a gas blow torch use that instead of the grill. I do love my power tools for cooking applications!

 

For quiche, don’t put the filling in the pastry until the last moment when the oven is hot and you are ready to bake.

 

Crunchy base guaranteed, every time !!!

Good luck.

 

If I am still here, which is not at all certain, due to various difficulties that I have encountered with some members of this forum, I may post other tried and tested Escoff pastry recipes. 


Edited by black dog - 3/30/14 at 4:03am
post #75 of 87
Thread Starter 

@black dog, what is your background?  Introduce yourself.  :look:

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #76 of 87

You want to know my background? Really?

How long have you got?

 

OK here's The abridged version:

Hotel (4 star, of course, "They did not have 5 star in my day, but Hey!") and restaurant management, along with classical training in the kitchens with French and Italian chefs.

In those days we had a brigade of chefs. Hard, hot work. Brilliant fun. The beginning of my love affair with food.

 

Research diver and general Dog's body, for Imperial Chemical Industries, and the University of Cambridge Coral Marine Research Group, in Port Sudan, in the Red Sea.

Hard, hot work.

Brilliant fun and quite a lot of very very good Black and Brown Sudanese Bango, SO....Can't remember too much detail.

I'm a child of the 60's and you know what they say. "If you can remember the 60's, you weren't there!"

 

BUT... The Sudan was a truly wonderful place in those days, The Bread Basket of Africa, and those Eritrean girls? OMG...they were so so beautiful!  Those were the days!

 

Back to good Old Blighty! and so, more management in London, then into the project finance industry, basically all over the world, Russia, Far East, Africa, South America.

Still at it today, in a fairly relaxed fashion.

 

When I ain't werkin', I'sa cookin' , Yes Sir!, Cookin' up a storm. Or at least, TRYING to!  

 

If only I can get Achatz, Blumenthal, Roux, Herme, Michalak, Blanc, Escoff, Savarin and Careme etc etc to divulge their bloody secrets.

 

So, still alive and bashing along.

 

Come to think of it. Really not sure why I didn't go back to serious Hotels and Restaurants. I am bloody well obsessed with all things food these days.

 

As Head Chef Pietro Alzetta always used to say "Isa so funny, the life. Init?

post #77 of 87

I am quite enjoying the history of the black dog.

Maybe he can move his story to this  New to Catering thread which has become a (casual) repository for "back in the day" stories.

Looks like I may need to post again.

My last one left me sounding like a hooker in training (which was certainly not the case) lol.

 

mimi

post #78 of 87

OK Nicko,

 

Now I am really confused.

 

I've posted precise, tried and tested Ecole Escoffier Paris pastry recipes for kokopuffs.

 

He then asks me to say something about myself, which I did, briefly and hopefully wittily. It seems to have been appreciated.

 

What have I done wrong now?

 

Can you explain please? Thank you

post #79 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post
 

I am not liking how this discussion is going. Lets either tone it down folks or we will "lock it down".


??????????????????????????????????????????????

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #80 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

For regular forms with sloped walls, I don't use weight filled foil or parchment "packages" to bake blind.

 

Instead of fighting gravity, I use gravity.

 

I line out the form as usual, than stack another matching form on top of it.  The dough is  now "sandwiched" in between two forms

 

Now place this upside down on a tray and bake as per  usual.

 

When cool, remove the top form.

 

Gravity will always pull  the dough down, use it to your advantage.


Alright, @foodpump, what do you do with the shells that have removeable bottoms?  The shell that sets on the underside of the dough while baking, what happens with the removeable bottom disc as it will drop away from the dough and onto the sheetpan?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #81 of 87

Put it on the outside of the pan?

post #82 of 87

My mistake all carry on. :)

Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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post #83 of 87

kokopuffs

I have tried to find out where the problem is, but I can't seem to get a reply. It really is confusing.

It can't possibly be my Escoffier pastry recipes can it?

So maybe it is my brief introduction and history which you asked for. Was there anything offensive in there. I don't think so. 

I am lost and I am finding it all rather exhausting to be honest.

 

Hope you like the recipes anywway. 

post #84 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by black dog View Post
 

kokopuffs

I have tried to find out where the problem is, but I can't seem to get a reply. It really is confusing.

It can't possibly be my Escoffier pastry recipes can it?

So maybe it is my brief introduction and history which you asked for. Was there anything offensive in there. I don't think so. 

I am lost and I am finding it all rather exhausting to be honest.

 

Hope you like the recipes anywway. 


Not a problem with me!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #85 of 87

Seems to be OK now;

post #86 of 87
I am with Kuan.
The pop out bottom would have to be small enuf that the potiental for tearing of the dough is moot.
If it is not maybe switch for the bottom of a smaller pan?

mimi
post #87 of 87

flip, kuan, foodpump, Hello all

I have seen famous French patissieres do this with the smaller tartelettes i.e. plain and fluted round and barquette individual metal moulds. (They normally have a sort of brown non-stick coating).

 

As pump says you roll out your paste as per usual and fill the little individual metal moulds.

Assuming you have a few extra moulds, you just take an empty one and place it on/in the filled mould.

You now have a barquette filled with paste and the second identical mould inside/on top of that like a sandwich. They then refrigerate them to get them very cold.

 

They then just blind bake at about 170c as normal, meaning the right way up rather than upside down, removing the top mould after about 10 mins allowing the case to dry and colour a bit.

You are using the second metal barquette to hold your pastry in place, (and stop it puffing up too much), instead of the usual foil or bean filled baking paper, while it cooks,

Seems to work fine for them.

As to blind baking a large tart case with another tart case inside and upside down, Interesting concept. Never tried it. **** Anyway, I only have two loose bottom tart moulds, one 20cm and the other 30cm.

 

Don't see why the removable bottom would have sticking issues, because most of these recipes have pretty high butter to flour ratios ( the Ecole Escoffe Paris recipes I posted above are around 70% butter to flour), and anyway, you want to lightly butter your moulds before you fill, even if they are non stick.

All these high butter recipes mean that butter seeps out as the case cooks, so there should be no sticking.

 

In France and especially Brittany where I am at present, they say there are three important ingredients in great pastry. Butter....Butter....and... Butter. Just don't be on a diet!

 

In the Escoff recipes I use, I fill the mould and get it very cold in the fridge before I blind bake. This really does limit shrinkage issues and I think cold pastry is key. The fact that there is still some shrinkage makes it easy to unmould after cooking.

 

I'm no expert, but Jacques Genin, for example, has one of the very best, and bloody expensive!!! pastries/cake/chocolate shops in Paris. His stuff is wonderful, and there is usually a long queue outside the door. So I follow his methods and my results are pretty good. 

 

One thing about foodpumps method. I am wondering about gravity causing the butter that seeps out to run down the sides of the case. If, being upside down, the pastry case is covered by the second mould, how do you remove it after 15 mins in order to let it dry and colour during the final 10 mins of cooking???

 

Interesting idea.

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