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The perfect Beef Wellington

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I thought I'd share my little adventure of the other day in which I prepared and old favorite for the boss'.

Since my boss is an avid Gourmet I thought it'd be cool to let him in the kitchen for a little one on one collaboration.

 

Here's the menu followed by a little insight to all the varied steps:

 

 

Tempura Oysters

With

Zesty Dipping Sauce

 

Sourdouigh Baguette

 

wood Grilled Romaine

 Balsamic Vinaigrette

 

Classic Beef Wellington

 

Seared Beef Tenderloin

Wrapped in Brioche pastry

 Mushroom Duxelle and Liver Pate

Served a La Perigourdine

Buttered Asparagus

 Pomme Parissienne

 

Save a Little Room for Something Sweet…

 

 

 

The entree was Wellington of Beef with Sauce Perigeaux. 

I have made it a million times in my career but never, never, did I say never?....have I ever made it taste like this one.

As my boss is an avid Gourmet he has also made the dish. In fact it was the dish he made 40 years ago this week at the engagement party for he and his wife.

 

So many steps......

 

I made 1 cup of liver pate adding Madeira to it.

I made 1 cup of mushroom Duxelle with cream and a red Burgundy added

I made a  half recipe of Brioche dough....I had always used puff pastry before to dismal results.

 

I took a whole tenderloin and cleaned out the Chateau Briand, coated it with buter Kosher Salt and black pepper. I seared it in olive oil and butter in a heavy copper pan, on all sides as well as the end, and placed it in a 400 degree oven for 20 minutes. Took it out with an internal temperature of 110. I placed it on a frozen pan right out of the freezer to stop the cooking. I took it out to the patio room where it is winter temperature to allow it to cool.

 

Hor d Oeuvres were tempura fried oysters with mignonette sauce. Appetizer was wood grilled romaine with balsamic vinaigrette, avocado slices and tomato brunoise. Dessert was mixed berry sherbert......

 

While that ate the appetizer....I placed a very thin coat of both pate and duxelle all around the meat. I rolled out the brioche about 1/8 inch thick and placed the meat on top. I egg washed the edges and sealed the whole thing, removing any excess dough. I egg washed the whole thing an into the oven it went at 450 degrees for 20 minutes. Took it out with an internal temperature of 130 and it sat on the counter for 1 few minutes while the Mrs. took pictures. When I sliced the first slice....it was a perfect.....and I mean PERFECT medium rare. Lots of freshly shaved truffles in the brown sauce.....Madeira too.

 

post #2 of 15

I wish I had something wise and witty to say but all I can think of is.....YUM!

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #3 of 15

Exquisite menu (wish i was there, as i like each and all the dishes you prepared) and thanks for sharing some tips, but where're the photos?

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #4 of 15

Sounds very delicious.

 

Congrats on the great success!

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #5 of 15

Yum! Sounds like you have the whole process down like a champ! I made individual Beef Wellingtons for Thanksgiving dinner. We recently learned how to make blitz puff pastry in class, so I used that for the puff pastry. I purchased the pate from Central Market. It was a combination of several bird livers, and had truffles in it. Made my own Duxelle, though. My guests loved it. I actually coated the puff pastry with the pate and Duxelle instead of coating the meat with it. Do you find that method works better? I got so worked up and stressed over it, but it all turned out really well.
 

post #6 of 15

Back in late 60's or early 70's (when I was 18-20 yo and very comfortable in kitchen), Dad announced that Sunday dinner would be beef Wellington.  He got the idea from the limited (but GREAT) cooking shows on TV at that time... all PBS... Julia, Jeff Smith, Graham Kerr, for sure.  He was a serious beef guy who like his pretty rare.  He buys this BIG $$ hunka tenderloin and hands me a cookbook!!  No duxelle or pate, pretty much expensive hunka tender beef cooked in pastry crust... how hard could it be??  So a finda a recipe for pastry crust... nothing complicated.  Checked out how hot and how long to cook to assure it was still plenty pink inside and went to town.  Was patting myself on the back before it even went into oven... looked WONDERFUL!!  Was getting everybody ELSE to pat me on the back when it came out of oven to rest... looked like something right out of a cookbook!  We all sat down for SUnday dinner... Dad, brother, sister, and grandparents.  Everybody was all OOH AAH!!  WELL, ya couldn't CUT thru the crust with a carving knife!?!  Brother was maybe 15-16 and literally ROFLAO!!  Grandfather was saying... it's fine!  We almost had to CHISEL the crust off... but LUCKILY, the beef was cooked perfectly!!  WHEW!

post #7 of 15

chefross,

just cuz i'm a curious girl, what added the zesty zippiness to your mignonette? a different type of peppercorn?horseradish?  what was your 'little something' for dessert?, and where are the pictures?

all sounds so very spot on...cheers on you

 

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #8 of 15

I must agree with everyone here, this meal was an absolute success.

 

@ Joey:

 

Quote:
Dessert was mixed berry sherbert

He ended the evening with something light , fruity & refreshing, perfect for a meal like that.

 

As for the zippiness in the mignonette?  a small guess ; champange vinegar ?

 

 @ Chef Ross : FWIW sometimes its hard to take  pics when your in the moment. They must have really enjoyed that. thumb.gif

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #9 of 15

thanks petals,

sorry, i guess i missed that somehow...sounds delightful

another zippy wild guess...since the oysters were tempura...wasabi perhaps?

joey


Edited by durangojo - 12/9/12 at 4:48pm

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #10 of 15

You've used puff pasrty in the past with.....

 

That's what I've always used for Wellies, what were your "dismal results"?

 

Otherwise, pretty close to what I do, 'cept the pate/dux varies a little.

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

chefross,

just cuz i'm a curious girl, what added the zesty zippiness to your mignonette? a different type of peppercorn?horseradish?  what was your 'little something' for dessert?, and where are the pictures?

all sounds so very spot on...cheers on you

 

joey

I used Sambal Olek strained to get out the chili pieces, red wine vinegar and a little sugar for my "zippiness"

Dessert was a simple mixed berry sherbert.

I let the boss oogle over the camera. She took the pictures....I was too busy getting this all right for them.

 

Meez........whenever I used puff pastry the inside of the crust next to the meat is always soggy. The underside of the crust is as well.

I can never get a crispy dry crust when using puff pastry. Never!!!

post #12 of 15

Sounds superb.  And nice twist on the grilled lettuce, I LOVE chargrilled romaine.  I slice a whole romaine heart in half and brush it with olive oil and char grille it then serve it drizzled with caesar dressing and top with croutons.  You just reminded me of doing it again.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #13 of 15

Sounds great man but where are the photos?

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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post #14 of 15

I agree with everyone else...we need photos, and if you vent your puff pastry, then it won't come out soggy...
 

post #15 of 15

That must be fairly true about venting, as when I lattice the puff for wellingtons it seems dryer.

But I generally dont get sogginess with beef, (though moist crust yes) but it is a definite

problem with salmon wellingtons.

Never was crazy about ready-made puff anyway, ready to try something different.

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