or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Gravy

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hello fellow food enthusiasts,

I'm having a party and I'll be serving several pork tenderloins, 2 or 3 each of the following; an herb crusted, a bacon wrapped and a dried fruit stuffed.

 

I would like to serve gravies to compliment each and my wife suggested a mushroom gravy since one of our neighbors belongs to some farming co-op and recently inundated all the neighbors with fresh white mushrooms.

 

I thought it would be a simple thing, just create a standard base gravy (roux and then add some broth, chicken probably) and then throw in the shrooms but the wife said there's more to it and after discussing it longer than I would have liked to, I conceded to speak to the pros.

 

Since everyone has enough shrooms to last a while, I would like something that that will leave a lasting impression and not make everyone say "oh no, not more mushrooms....!"

 

So what say thee.....

 

Red.

 

PS: any tantalizing sauces or gravies that come to mind to replace my "standard" gravy will be more than welcome. It's always been my favorite because of it's simplicity.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
Reply
When it's smoking, it's smoking!
Reply
post #2 of 7

Hello Redvan,

 

If you cook the mushrooms before adding the liquid their flavor will more than double (thats true with any aromatic).  Sautee them in fat until browned, you can do this with shallots, onions, a classic mirepoix with ham shank, deglaze with an alcohol that fits your theme - white wine is (almost) always safe.

 

for the fruit stuffed one, I would go with a caribiean style BBQ sauce or a gastric Instead of gravy.  Not saying it can't be done, just not seeing a veloute and fruit go together so well...

post #3 of 7

How about something more like bearnaise for the herb crusted one?

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #4 of 7

Chop mushrooms very small, saute with shallot , garlic, chopped parsley, some thyme  in butter, stir in flour and drippings from roasted pork with some stock add a splash orange juice and chix stock and some chardonnay or brandy, cook for a while  over low heat  Correct seasoning. Finish if you like with some heavy cream or leave as is. Although containing mushroom they almost all  cook away, thus only leaving their flavor.. This is gravy type(flour). If you use starch or a reduction , it is then a sauce. 

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #5 of 7

To make things easier for yourself I would suggest serving only one gravy for each of the tenderloins, and perhaps some kind of stewed fruit like apples or cranberries.  Too many choices can get too confusing sometimes and too complicated.  A mushrooms gravy is always nice, but I've had so many compliments over my mustard gravy and I serve it with pork or chicken often.  I think it would compliment all of your tenderloins.  Come to think of it, it may even be nice if you add the mushrooms to it too though I would not.  Sorry about the lack of measurements, I'm guilty of being "a-little-bit-of-this-a-little-bit-of-that" type of cook.

 

  • Drippings
  • Shallots
  • garlic
  • Thyme
  • Butter
  • Dijon mustard
  • Lemon juice
  • Chicken stock
  • Heavy cream
  • Salt/pepper

 

  1. Using some of the drippings from a roast pork dish put in a medium pot and add a little butter.
  2. Sautee the shallots, garlic and thyme until soft
  3. Add the mustard and lemon juice
  4. Add the chicken stock and reduce
  5. Turn off the heat, add just a little heavy cream and season to taste.
  6. Strain and serve alongside pork.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #6 of 7

You could use same sauce for both yet have 2 entirely different colors Make sauce then split in 2 pans add cream to one no cream to other  you got it 2 sauces. They wont know difference.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

Well,

The party was a smashing success except for the fact that I bit off too much to chew, meaning I tried to cook too much food for entrees and appetizers and while trying to get the entrees complete so I could put them in chaffing dishes, I fell behind on the appetizers (actually forgot all about them) so dinner was served late. (Having a new kitchen is nice but it's still the same size stove with only one oven and four burners.)

 

However, I took a little advise from everyone who contributed to this thread and turned out 2 fantastic gravies that people were raving about and asking for more....

 

The first was made from the brazing liquid from the herb crusted tenderloin. After removing the meat, I added a small amount of flour and brought the pot up to a boil to reduce the liquid and then added some white wine. I was in such a rush at this point that I just grabbed whatever was on the counter that people had brought and were drinking. (Don't even ask me what it was, couldn't begin to figure that out.)

 

The other was basically Chefedb's beginnings but I left out the OJ (wife forgot to pick it up) and  left out the drippings as there weren't any. I also used red wine from the counter again, I think it was a Burgundy . This gave the sauce a nice purplish tone that everyone really loved.

 

Overall, everyone was very impressed with the menu and gravies and I want to thank all who assisted me with your suggestions. These two gravies really made the difference for all the meats dishes.

 

 

Red.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
Reply
When it's smoking, it's smoking!
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking