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how to slice a hard-boiled egg - Page 2

post #31 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrmnms View Post

I laughed more from your comebacks, thanks. I actually think my chickens are pretty cool and they are very social. They come running when they hear me or my kids. They pick'm up , pet them (no shaking) Happy birds are great layers. I use a cheese knife.


Yes, indeed.  Happy birds are great layers.  This year I have Delawares.  What breed of layer do you have?

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post #32 of 56

I jut use my chefs knife *shrug*

post #33 of 56

smalll bucket of hot water a clean cloth and a thin blided knife!! dip knife in water slice egg wipe blade dip and repeat! works a treat!
 

post #34 of 56

The cheese slicer is  a great tool to use and its effortless. I have a ceramic knife which works beautifully.

post #35 of 56

As a Chef, I always had my pantry people slice them, that was always the easiest for me.............Lets move on to sliced bread now!!!!!!!!!

post #36 of 56

I usually keep a damp towel on hand and wipe my super freshly sharpened knife with every slice.  I don't use any special knives, just my chef's knife.  Sorry if this wasn't much help.
 

post #37 of 56
To Wyandotte, used to a bunch of fancy breeds, gorgeous birds, not all great layers . I currently have Buff Orpingtons, Rhode Island Reds and a few Sex Links. Laid all through the Hurricane ad storms this winter. They're a happy group of girls. Easy to manage.
post #38 of 56
In the spirit of this post, I will be attempting to convince the girls to adjust their egg laying to half eggs to facilitate deviled eggs without slicing, which seems to be an enormous problem.
post #39 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrmnms View Post

To Wyandotte, used to a bunch of fancy breeds, gorgeous birds, not all great layers . I currently have Buff Orpingtons, Rhode Island Reds and a few Sex Links. Laid all through the Hurricane ad storms this winter. They're a happy group of girls. Easy to manage.

I have 8 Buff Orpingtons pullets giving me 6 eggs a day, I give them apple and grass and layer feed.........happy gals and one Buff Rooster starting to wink at them as they pass the water troff,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,I see love in the air.........ChefbillyB

post #40 of 56

Bill....your chickens will eat meat too!....Mine loved it. I'd throw the carcass from a roast chicken out to the hen house, they would go wild getting the leftover meat off it.....Throw some cooked spaghetti out for them too..Funny to watch.

post #41 of 56

Oh, yes.  Chickens will eat ANYTHING.  Baby mice, huge insects, corpses of all kinds if they're there and I don't notice them to remove them.  Ugh.
 

post #42 of 56
When I watch 'the girls" eat when they're hungry, I 'm glad they're not 10 feet tall. Carnivorous dinosaurs definitely come to mind. Very aggressive toward left over meat and insects.
post #43 of 56

I had an empty lot next to my property, about three acres, in the summer the grass hoppers were plentiful and about 3" long, the birds spent a lot of time over there hunting and consuming lots. And yes to mice too....they were always on patrol for them, had lots of field mice around the pole barn, baby mice went down easily.

post #44 of 56
My neighbors are afraid of my chickens. Too friendly for their own good. They weren't too crazy about my Rottie either. He got along just fine with the chickens.
post #45 of 56

That won't work for deviled eggs.

post #46 of 56
Cut while turning the egg, around the yolk then pop the whole yolk out
post #47 of 56

I think it might be argued that if slicing the yolk leads to a crumbled aftermath perhaps it was boiled on too high a heat? This is my observation... I've had soft glistening yolks that were fully cooked and firm, the crumbling seems to be one of those neurotic imperfections which drives one slowly bonkers over time....

post #48 of 56

Sam's egg:

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #49 of 56

I just made deviled eggs tonight and find that slicing isn't the problem but peeling is (unless the eggs are about a week old). I find that a good paring knife does the trick for me.

post #50 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug View Post

The thinner the knife the better (meaning from the top part you look down onto to the cutting edge) .Try rubbing a touch of oil on the blade. The dental floss really does work beautifully, and works for cutting cakes for layering as well.

:)


Yes the dental floss works wonderfully. If using a knife, what would rubbing oil on the blade accomplish?

post #51 of 56

ask yourself this 'does the recipie for deviled eggs call for oil? cuz you're about to introduce it into the mix

post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyandotte View Post
 

I don't know why anyone would find the use of a cute little egg slicer objectionable.  It is easier than floss or thin knives.  To me, anyway.
 

lol.. yes, I agree with you.. but I think it's a no no for professional chefs.

post #53 of 56
Kinza, not sure why you would think that. When I worked in the hotel I found plenty of uses for my egg slicer.
post #54 of 56

I agree. We always had a bunch of them in the Garde Manger kitchen. You can also cut olives, mushroom, mozzarella balls, and strawberries, etc.

I wouldn't use oil for easier slicing with knife or cutter, I would use a little water.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #55 of 56

Yes give them a good shake..... Is there such a thing as a bad shake?? ... I'm not talking about the bacon vanilla caramel milkshake we think about once and a while ;)

 

We cook our boiled eggs in a steamer (Rational)

 

to cut usually use a french knife with a hot water bath nearby to clean between slices

 

Into an ice bath to cool and then we start appealing!

 

How many flavours of deviled eggs do others usually make? We usually do 3, goat cheese, avocado, cajun

Whenever possible use local products, be it produce, meat, cheese, wine or beer! 

And local here means within the two counties near us!

Our guests will appreciate it and possibly return because of it!

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Whenever possible use local products, be it produce, meat, cheese, wine or beer! 

And local here means within the two counties near us!

Our guests will appreciate it and possibly return because of it!

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post #56 of 56

The best method I found is to use a ceramic knife when the egg is still cold.

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