or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Scotch

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Any scotch lovers out there?

I just recently bought my first bottle of scotch. The flavour is great. So what kind of scotch are you drinking? Do you mix it? Do you ever apply it to a dish?
post #2 of 14
SCOTCH?

I'll have you know we call it whisky in Scotland:D

My husband is the whisky expert in our house, and we only have single malts. His favourites are Islay, especially Bowmore. He also likes Orkney malts and a couple of Speyside malts.

I suspect you will enjoy your whisky journey!


Please note, our whiskey, unlike Irish or others, has no 'e'biggrin.gif:D:D
post #3 of 14

As Ishbel says, It's Whisky. Just to let you know, Outside of Scotland It seems to be Scotch. In Ireland it's whiskey...With an E On that point, you should try Paddies. It's a blend, but good on it's own or with a splash of water. As is the famous Grouse in Scotland. A real easy drinker. OK you can add coke or ginger ale.

 

In Scotland you drop the E and it's whisky and the choice is incredible. The Bowmore Ishbel mentions is way too peaty for my taste. The water it's made from runs through the peat fields and gives an overpowering flavour.

 

If your taste is a wee bit sweet try the Tamdhu. My favourite. if it's a kick you're after, then Glenmorangie.

 

But they're single malts.Expensive.  If you want a smooth blended, then you really can't beat the famous grouse. You can get it in liquor stores in America ( great muckle 2 litre bottles with handles on too)(God bless America)

 

If its really cheap, chances are it's gonna taste cheap too. Just 'cos it says made in Scotland doesn't mean a thing. We have Sh &^e here too

 

PS Crannachan is a Scots desert made from toasted oats mixed with whipped cream, Raspberries, heather honey and malt whiskey. Lots of variations worth googling

 

It goes well in a pepper sauce to go with a steak. Flambe it tho 

 

A whisky liquour like Drambuie is great for masserating fruit like clementines and persimmons as a desert with creme fraiche


Edited by bughut - 12/14/12 at 3:38pm
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
Reply
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
Reply
post #4 of 14

How 'bout Bourbon? smile.gif

 

I've been enjoying Evan Williams' 10 yr old "Single Barrel Vintage" for the past couple of years.

 

I did recently have the opportunity to try Macallan's Single Malt. It was very nice! Although, I must admit, it seemed a little too 'plain' after becoming accustomed to the distinct character of the Evan Williams.

post #5 of 14
Glenmorangie if I have the choice.
Just with a little drop of water in it.

Otherwise famous grouse, with water and ice, preferably out of a long glass.

And I still have a botle of 16 year old tom'n toul single malt, just waiting for that special occasion ....

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply
post #6 of 14

Just a side question - why is it ok to call whisky "scotch" or broth "scotch" but not ok to call Scots "Scotch"?  smile.gif

MY guess, is that scotch was an older term and remained in some contexts like whisky - or is it that the Scots themselves never refer to "scotch whisky" because that's just whisky, like americans don;t refer to american bread as american bread, but just as "bread" So "scotch" for whisky is simply a foreigner's way of calling it. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #7 of 14

We don't like it nowadays because it equates with food, scotch eggs, scotch broth, for instance.

 

although, in older texts, Scots, Scottish and Scotch are used to describe the people.  There are many in the US who describe themselves as Scotch-Irish, although many change the Scotch to Scots when they realise we don't like it lol.gif

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

We don't like it nowadays because it equates with food, scotch eggs, scotch broth, for instance.

 

Ok, so French shouldn't like to be called French because of French fries, French toast. ... and Belgians shouldn't like to be called Belgians because of Belgian waffles and Belgian endives...and Italians shouldn't like to be called Italians because of Italian bread.... Oh,  where will it all end???

 

Quote:

although, in older texts, Scots, Scottish and Scotch are used to describe the people.  There are many in the US who describe themselves as Scotch-Irish, although many change the Scotch to Scots when they realise we don't like it lol.gif

 

So what's not to like??? 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #9 of 14

We like to be contrary?

 

Following your examples, belgians would have to be called waffles or endivelol.gif

 

BTW, we just call it whisky, only foreigners call the water of life Scotch.

post #10 of 14

true enough. 

well i encountered the dislike in scotland for the word "scotch" applied to people the couple of times i went there, and have been careful ever since - Scots it will be.  and Edinburg is edinburrah! 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #11 of 14

My countrymen thank you!

 

BTW    EdinburgH is indeed Edinburrah, but it still has a final 'h'!

post #12 of 14

And I thought Edinburgh was pronounced "auld reekie."  Go figure.

 

I mostly drink bourbon and gin, but enjoy Scotch -- as well as damn near everything else as long as it isn't too sweet, and a few things which are.  We've got a few open bottles we're working on, but most of my current Scotch drinking is done at Beckham's Grill in Pasadena which not only does a lousy Martini but has a nice selection of distinguished single malts which it sells for half price on Wednesdays and [hic] Thursdays. 

 

These are some of my favorite, easily available in the US, whiskys:

 

  • Dalwhinnie (15YO):  A little too old and too smooth to be on the top of my list.  
  • Glenlivet (15 YO, Speyside):  Again, not enough character to make me a huge fan but it's the favorite of my closest friend, so we keep a bottle here for when he visits;
  • Laphroaig (10 YO, Islay): I've liked it since my sophisticated, hedonistic CPA/cousin first turned me on to it in the early seventies, but my tastes evolved and now I mostly find it too smoky for regular drinking.  Remember what Rick said about Captain Reynaud in Casablanca. "He's a man like all other men, only more so?"  Well Laphroaig is Scotch which tastes like Scotch, only more so. 
  • Macallan (12YO, Speyside):  Macallan is the whisky to serve to people who think they don't like whisky.  Light and smooth with a sweet finish, which comes from being finished in sherry casks.  The 20 YO is even more so, but way too expensive.  While I like Macallan well enough, if I'm going to drink anything that smooth and sweet, I prefer Bourbon or Tennesse Whiskey.
  • Oban (14 YO, Highlands).  From the town of Oban in the western Highlands.  Oban impeccably balances peat, sweetness, and a well aged smoothness.  It's my current Scotch favorite.

 

Òlamaid deoch-slàinte!

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 3/2/13 at 11:14pm
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

My countrymen thank you!

 

BTW    EdinburgH is indeed Edinburrah, but it still has a final 'h'!


aargh, i knew i'd alienate the scots in some way!  it didn;t look right but i didn;t know why

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #14 of 14

As for recipes, a long time ago I used to make a pasta sauce from James Beard's Pasta cookbook that was made with heavy cream, a nub of butter, and a bit of scotch, heated and reduced until the cream was a bit thick and the raw alcohol flavor was diminished. Then you added small bits of smoked salmon or lox. I haven't made it in years since I no longer live with a scotch drinker and usually only have bourbon on hand but it was pretty dreamy.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: The Late Night Cafe (off-topic)