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Evaluating a saute pan

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hi

 

I have two saute pans and I need to determine which one is better quality. Are there any acid tests that I can run on these pans to determine higher quality of the two. These are triply (steel-aluminum-steel) pans without non-stick coating with stainless steel lid.

 

Better still, if there are chefs on this forum from greater Toronto area, I need your help in evaluating these pans.

 

Thanks

post #2 of 13

Are both stainless? Sizes? Brands? Picks? 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #3 of 13

thickness

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
These are not branded pans. Thickness is 2.8 mm. I find these are heavier than other saute pans of same size. How much weight is too much for a 10 inch pan?
post #5 of 13

If you own them, use them and then you will know after a few days or a week. If you have not bought them yet, why did you decide these two pans were better than any other pan? French cast steel pans are a nice choice. Copper with stainless lining is good but expensive.  

Riveted handles are better than not.

Some kind of stay cool handle is nice but you can always put a handle protector on them if the handle is thin enough. 

How much weight is too much is entirely subjective. What you will be using them for, how much flipping and tossing you will do all make a difference. Fill the pan with some ingredients and try tossing them around. Notice how tired your hand/wrist is after a few minutes. 

I looked at an eight inch Mauviel copper pan in the store and it was so heavy I could barely lift it empty. 

You can test this in the store even if you haven't bought one. Just go find some small weighty objects to put in the pan to simulate the food and see how much fun you'll have. 

post #6 of 13

2.8 mm. is a nice thickness. It will keep the heat. But you need to train your forearms, ha! That sure's a heavy baby. 

How to evaluate both without using them, well... that's impossible. It's not just the measures, but the handle, the confort, your own empathy with the pans. Hope you find a Canadian cook to help you.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thank you I was also hoping that a Canadian chef might be able to help me here. One of these has copper as exterior while other one has stainless steel. These are definitly too heavy to toss around stuff. It is difficult to toss it empty smile.gif
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by sabv View Post

Thank you I was also hoping that a Canadian chef might be able to help me here.

 

 

???

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

 

 

???


Meaning a chef that I can physically visit and show the pans and take his advice. Since I am in GTA, a chef in GTA would be most appropriate.

post #10 of 13

My grandmother was Canadian (PEI) so maybe I can give another suggestion.  If you think it is going to be too heavy, select the lighter one.  Too heavy will be a major problem forever into the future.  Choosing the lighter weight, if htat is what you need to use it comfortably, may take a little more attention to any hotspots that may exist.  It is much better to work with cookware you can lift.  In my house there are two different categories of cookware (and knives) -- those for me and those for my wife.  She does not like big sharp knives and can't lift heavy pans.  Me, on the other hand crave both.  Dowaht you need to do and testing at a cookware shop is the best idea.  If that is not possible then you need to take a guess and choose one.  I'd choose the lighter of the options if I were you... just based on the concern you express for weight. 

post #11 of 13

http://store.calphalon.com/department/cookware/1949-1982-1957?CCAID=SCPTPAHP

 

They are light , good quality, works wonders for those who do not like very heavy pans. I agree with the other members here, in your original post you should have given a little more info. You are getting advice from many members who know their stuff on pots and pans.

 

Price range was another thing that was not discussed.

 

You are seeking information from a Canadian .....why ? A pan is a pan. Have you tested Mauviel ? In fact there are numerous threads on pans here if you do a search.

 

Is there a particular line of cookware in TO that I don't know about ?

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

 

Is there a particular line of cookware in TO that I don't know about ?

 

 

Newfi-Ware? biggrin.gif

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #13 of 13

LOL lol.gif

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
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