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Why unsalted butter in the dough mix when salt is added?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Pardon the likely dumb question, but as a newbie to baking, I'm curious why a dough recipe would call for unsalted butter when salt is also added to the mix?  

 

Thanks, Bob

post #2 of 12

When you use unsalted butter YOU control how much salt you put into a dish.   When you use salted butter its harder to control the amount of salt going into a dish.

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Makes sense, thanks.
 

post #4 of 12

That's because sometimes you don't want to put the salt in at the start of kneading, but rather a few minutes into the kneading.

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twyst View Post

When you use unsalted butter YOU control how much salt you put into a dish.   When you use salted butter its harder to control the amount of salt going into a dish.

 



Agree with Twyst~

 

Salted butter has so much salt in it. It would be overkill to use salted butter. I only bake with unsalted butter.

 

Off topic~

Twyst...My husband is a Saint's fan, also. My condolences  ;)  My Broncos are looking sweet, though!

post #6 of 12

The other reason is because, allegedly, unsalted butter is generally fresher than salted butter.

post #7 of 12

Salt Control.

You never really know how much salt "Salted Butter" contains. 
I use to only use salted butter in baking, until I began baking professionally. Since then, I've only purchased Unsalted Butter. 

If you cut salted butter from your diet, your sodium tolerance will begin to go down as well, and you will really be able to taste your foods much better, because it isn't masked behind salt. At the same time though, salt is imperative to bring out flavor in foods--just use it in moderation. 

 

Have you ever eaten unsalted butter before. At first, I didn't like it. But now I enjoy the fresh creaminess of it.

The cream they use to make the unsalted butter is of higher quality because it doesn't have the salt in it to hide it's imperfections!

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

The other reason is because, allegedly, unsalted butter is generally fresher than salted butter.

Salt is a preservative.

Unsalted butter has a shelf life of around 3 months.

Salted butter has a shelf life of about 5 months.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #9 of 12

Thanks for that too. I forget about shelf life sometimes. Where I work we literally use about 300-400 lbs of unsalted butter per week. 

post #10 of 12

I don't necessarily worry about shelf life of butter at work, but more like how long has it been around before it gets delivered to me at work.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Scheitel View Post

The cream they use to make the unsalted butter is of higher quality because it doesn't have the salt in it to hide it's imperfections!

 

 

A bit over the top on this statement - it's all made in the same machines and with the same starting ingrediants.   The only difference is how it is finished.

 

You are correct though about the amount of salt being variable between manufacturers.

 

The salt doesn't hide anything, it's for preservation... shelf life.

Think about it... adding salt makes the cost of the product go up... so why is unsalted often more expensive?

Because it's more perishable and needs to have a higher mark-up to reflect the waste.

 

Remember when using 'un-salted' butter the reciepe adds more salt - to bring out that same butter taste that is hiding the 'bad' cream?  I think not.

(Salt brings out flavours - it doesn't mask them...)

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #12 of 12
I use whatever I have available. I omit salt if butter I am using is salted. To me it still comes out balanced. BTW, I do not store butter in the pantry shelf, only in the fridge. Salt is the "back drop" that brings out other flavors.
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