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flour.

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

I need to know all the general rules of flour because i feel like I dont understand how flour works, and i believe its one of the reasons why my dough fails 50 % of the time, I've neve really stepped into bread making yet but i feel it's becausei dont have complete control of how my dough should turn out.

post #2 of 29

I don't know that there are general rules for flour. What are you trying to make and what is happening that you feel makes whatever you are trying to make a failure?

post #3 of 29

Plane flour is for short crust pies, pizza, pancakes or anything that doesn't need to rise, self-raising you need to use it with cakes never ever use plane flour because as we know cakes need to rise not stay flat like pancakes or a pizza crust, anything that needs to rise like a cake use self-raising.

post #4 of 29

I beg to differ on the self-rising flour. At least here in the states cake recipes are usually written for all-purpose or cake flour and the leavening is added to the batter in the form of baking powder, baking soda, cream of tartar, stiffly beaten egg whites--or some combination of the above. 

 

Packaged self-rising flour has leavening (baking soda or powder) and salt added to it. Using it in a standard cake recipe that calls for all purpose or cake flour--as most do-- and that also called for leavening and salt would ruin the cake.

post #5 of 29

emmbai90 packs a truly impressive amount of wrongness into just one sentence.

 

If you search on "flour types" in this forum you will find more discussion of flour, including this useful link: http://www.theartisan.net/flour_descriptions_and_definitions.htm

 

But ChicagoTerry's question is the right one: what are you trying to make?  What's the recipe and what happens?  It's not clear from the initial post if you are trying to make bread or something else.  Flour does different things in different kinds of baked goods.

 

McGee's _On Food and Cooking_ is a nice reference if you're looking for more scientific explanations of how stuff works.

post #6 of 29

Yeh you can do  that too and add shortening and soda into plane flour if you want but that's just a basic general rule for baking is all if you want the easiest way to make stuff instead of adding in 3 types of things into plane flour, self-raising just proves quicker, and you can add in a bit more soda if you want, both ways creates the same results :)

post #7 of 29

For me, there is one disadvantage to self rising flour, laser.gifit is really difficult to reduce the amount of leavening!

 

I prefer the ability to add the amount I want, not what someone else thinks is best for me crazy.gif
 

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post #8 of 29
Devin, you might find The King Arthur Flour Baker's Companion book helpful. At the end of the book they have an extensive discussion of the types of flours and there uses. You can probably find the book at you local library.
post #9 of 29
Thread Starter 

sorry to gravedig but thanks for the info.

 

specifically I was trying to make rohti/chapati bread and it calls for hot water, and (I've gotten better with flour) I've always been told in order to keep dough soft and workable you must keep everything cool.

post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 

i will be making pizza dough for the first time sometime around this 4th of july weekend, I'm thinking of makign a deep dish pizza using my pie pan?  any objections?

post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Devin Ancrum View Post

i will be making pizza dough for the first time sometime around this 4th of july weekend, I'm thinking of makign a deep dish pizza using my pie pan?  any objections?


The adaptation seems cool to me as long as the pie pan is made of pretty much made of the same material as a pizza pan: either thick aluminum or black steel.  Checkout this pizzamaking forum:  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php


Edited by kokopuffs - 7/2/13 at 4:38pm

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post #12 of 29
A pie pan would not be the first thing I would reach for when attempting a deep dish pizza
Do you have a specific recipe in mind?
If so please provide the link as we are working in the dark here.

mimi
post #13 of 29

deleted.


Edited by Antilope - 7/11/13 at 11:22am
post #14 of 29

Thanks, Antilope! That's a great resource!

post #15 of 29

I think you want something deeper and with straight sides to make a deep dish pizza or you risk all that messy filling overflowing your pie tin. Make sure to oil whatever you use. When I worked in a pizza place decades ago we used well-seasoned, straight-sided metal pans, 2-1/2 or 3 inches deep.

post #16 of 29

Devin A:

 

Chapati is usually made with "chapati flour," a tasty low-gluten whole wheat flour sold in Indian stores.  The simplest method uses cold water, but I've seen recipes using hot water. 

 

Re pizza, have you made yeasted doughs before?  If not I might try a couple of shallow-dish experiments first.  

post #17 of 29

Gotta listen to the cook from Chicago...they know their deep dish.

The correct pan that has seen some oven time makes all the difference.

That's how you get that nutty, buttery crust (Hey you...you gonna eat that last crust? No? Give it over....)

 

mimi

post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmbai90 View Post

Plane flour is for short crust pies, pizza, pancakes or anything that doesn't need to rise, self-raising you need to use it with cakes never ever use plane flour because as we know cakes need to rise not stay flat like pancakes or a pizza crust, anything that needs to rise like a cake use self-raising.

I NEVER use self raising flour for cakes. I always use plain flour and they turn our perfectly.

 

That is totally incorrect, sorry.

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post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

For me, there is one disadvantage to self rising flour, laser.gifit is really difficult to reduce the amount of leavening!

 

I prefer the ability to add the amount I want, not what someone else thinks is best for me crazy.gif
 

 

Totally agree.

 

Sorry my last post came across as rather harsh. You've said it far better than I biggrin.gif

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post #20 of 29

Just an observation here, but I seem to see a lot more recipes using self-rising flour in the southern U.S. than elsewhere. Admittedly, I see a lot more recipes from the U.S. generally than from elsewhere since that's where I live. lol.gif  Most of those recipes are for quick breads: biscuits, (which in the States would be similar to scones); tea or breakfast loaves such as banana bread, zucchini bread; and bars such as brownies, etc. I've seen it used as a coating for fried chicken as well. It's not an ingredient I'm at all familiar with. Rather, we used the constituents of it: all-purpose flour, baking powder and salt and measured each separately.

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post #21 of 29

Yeh imagine because it's cheaper than plane flour so they improvise

post #22 of 29
This thread was a year old before your comment.
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmbai90 View Post

Yeh imagine because it's cheaper than plane flour so they improvise


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

This thread was a year old before your comment.

All those months have passed without Emma finding the spell check key .
As for fact checking ?
Must still be too busy learning how to work with plane flour.

mimi
post #24 of 29

I'd aloud that if you can get your hands on any of the plane flour (or is it flower?) from flight 370, it'd be not inexpensive....

post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post

I'd aloud that if you can get your hands on any of the plane flour (or is it flower?) from flight 370, it'd be not inexpensive....

You just had to go there Dillbert.
Everyone currently on line say cheese.
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mimi
post #26 of 29

@Dillbert @flipflopgirl I see nothing constructive in those remarks and I am going to ask that you stop.

 

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post #27 of 29
Sorry Nicko.
Out of control.
Emma sorry for being snarky.
No excuse for poor manners.
My mom taught me better than that.

mimi
post #28 of 29

Hello, this is my first post as a newbie to Chef Talk. In relation to Devin's original 'flour question', I don't have a particular answer, though I would like to put out there an extension to the question

 

Before flour goes through it's 'processing method' (from field to packaging), is there any factor that might compromise the Quality of the flour?, ie: a wheat field might have budding 'rust' plants growing, and then at the time of harvesting the crop, the rust plants get caught up in the mix - would this alter the end product or not?

 

What about environmental conditions, lack of water, too much heat, winds, etc.

 

 

Thanks in Advance

SRA

post #29 of 29

As with anything you cook, the ingredients need to be good for best results. In bread, be it pizza, foccacia, or bread, the flour is the star! As mentioned before by other Chefs King Arthur (KA) Flour and their baking advise is GREAT. I make sourdough pizza crusts and Italian bread for some number of years and King Arthur Flour and other ingredients they sell figure heavily in these doughs. If you want to master these skills you will need to work at it and learn a lot about the type of wheat. One can make ok pizza crust with all-purpose flour but you need to know these ARE NOT all created equal, King Arthur Flour is one of the more expensive flour around but it is worth the money. My pizza crust includes Italian 00 as well as European Organic Artisinal flour for a good chew.

 

By the way, KA has professional flour are well.

 

See my blog on pizza dough

 

Pizza on the Grill

 

 

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