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Shaun Fernandez 230mm Gyuto

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I'm in the market for a new chef's knife to replace my 20 year old Henckel.  I'm just getting into sharpening and have a borrowed edge pro that I've used to on the Henckel and other knives around the house (all stainless).  I'd like to get a set of waterstones to try free hand sharpening and am also looking at purchasing a new knife.  I'm hoping to get a sharper knife than the Henckel and don't mind carbon steel patina, so my original idea (based on reading posts here, was to get a Sabatier Canadian Massif 8" or a Masimoto 210 or 240mm carbon steel.  The Sabatier knives are sold, as it turns out, at an importer near where I live, so I could check them out in person. 

 

However, I came across a post here from a person looking for a new knive who was considering the Shaun Fernandez.  It doesn't look like they chose it, and nobody seemed to make any comments about it one way or the other.  It's a nice looking knife, in my opinion, and it seems to be made of  one of the "magic powder" steels.  Does anyone have any experience with them?  Would this be a good "first real" knive?  What are the pluses or minuses of choosing it over the other two choices?

 

Thanks in advance.

post #2 of 7
Thread Starter 

Too good to be true.  Your silence speaks volumes...

 

Based on another post here I've decided to purchase a K Sabatier sold by China Fair through Amazon.  It's a 10", which will be by far the largest kitchen knife I've ever used.  I'll probably pick up the sharpening set sold by Chef Knives to go after the holiday, but for now I still have use of the Edge Pro.  Does anybody have any advise as to the initial sharpening?  Do I have to do anything different the first time?

post #3 of 7

If it's a carbon, go 15* flat bevel on both sides, and fairly symmetrical.  60/40 works, but don't go much more radical than that or the edge will collapse. 

 

If it's stainless, go with the factory 20* and keep the edge as close to 50/50 if possible.  While I don't think they're so bad as to rate a big warning, I don't recommend K-Sabatier stainless knives either.  You can do a lot better for the same price. 

 

Sometimes K-Sabatier factory edges leave a lot to be desired.  Plan on profiling yours on Day 1. 

 

Sabatier alloys are very soft, even by European standards.  Edges will roll very easily and you'll need to steel frequently to keep the knife working.  If you don't already have a good "steel," you'll need one ASAP.  The silver lining is that Sabatier alloys are very tough and hard wearing, you won't have to go to the stones as often as you would with... say... a Fujiwara FKM. 

 

If you're going to stick with Sabs for awhile, you don't need a good water stone set until you add some stronger/harder knives.  The EP stones will work just fine.  I've fooled around sharpening carbon Sabs for close to 40 years and it's my impression that oil stones handle the soft/tough alloy as quickly as the best water stones, and that Arkansas edges in particular last the longest.  If you've absolutely, positively got to have a set of bench stones, it should comfort you that a good set of oil stones is less than half the price as a good set of water stones and needs significantly less maintenance.

 

BDL

post #4 of 7

Since you already have an EP the good news is Chefknivestogo has a Arkansas set for the EP. 

 

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/3pcarstsetfo.html

 

 

Jim

post #5 of 7

can't really say much about shaun's knife but i can say that s35vn that shaun uses for his knives are absolutely awesome stuff. i actually wouldn't mind buying one of his knives myself.

 

=D

post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the responses. 

 

Regarding the Arkansas set for the Edge Pro; what is the advantage of them over the stock Edge Pro stones?  I've actually managed to put a pretty sharp edge on my stainless knives with the stock set.  Is the Arkansas set faster, better edge, longer lasting etc?

 

boar_d_laze: The Sab is carbon. You commented on the posting about those knives saying that they looked like NOS. (labeled Carbon instead of High Carbon on the blade).  As to profiling, how do I accomplish this? How do I know I need to accomplish this?  Also, I see yours and others posts about the percentage of the bevel (60/40, 50/50 etc) I assume that means the edge favors one side of the blade or the other.  What is the advantage of an assymetrical edge?

 

Thanks again,

 

Russ

post #7 of 7

Regarding the Arkansas stones it goes back top what BDL said.

 

Quote:

If you're going to stick with Sabs for awhile, you don't need a good water stone set until you add some stronger/harder knives.  The EP stones will work just fine.  I've fooled around sharpening carbon Sabs for close to 40 years and it's my impression that oil stones handle the soft/tough alloy as quickly as the best water stones, and that Arkansas edges in particular last the longest.  If you've absolutely, positively got to have a set of bench stones, it should comfort you that a good set of oil stones is less than half the price as a good set of water stones and needs significantly less maintenance.

 

By their nature waterstones wear away as you sharpen and need frequent flattening which wears away even more.

 

My Gesshin 400 waterstone, about $80, kicks ass over my Norton fine India, about $17, on speed but over the last year or so I have worn away about 1/3-1/2 of it's original size but my India is unfazed.

 

I do knives that can be done on the cheap oilstones to save wear on the expensive waterstones. Waterstones will work regardless and get to crazy fine grits.

 

Jim

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