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guess I need a "hello" post

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I'm Daniel, from Denmark. I work at a high-profile restaurant ("Grill and Brasserie" to some). I've been cooking professionally for roughly 8 years, 4 of which I spent as an apprentice, but with plenty of responsibility. The past 4 years have been spent cooking high-end food of the kind you'd never do at home. Not necessarily expensive, but complicated as hell.

 

I have experience with most modern kitchen appliances including the venerable pacojet, and I believe I know when to use it and when not to.

 

Mostly, I have a deep felt passion for food that will just not stop. Sometimes I even wish it would. It gets in the way of me interacting with my family, my friends, even people I don't know - 'cause I'm cooking - but once the end result gets on the table, all is forgotten, and all is good. I believe food is the thing that binds us together, above all else, and I am glad that I chose food as the way of my life.

 

Oh, and I'm glad to have found these forums and look forward to sharing experiences :)

post #2 of 6

Velkommen til Chef Talk, Daniel. We're glad you found us and hope you enjoy being part of the community. I've visited Denmark myself a couple of times and intend to return, although it's been many years since my last visit. 

 

I have a brother who's a chef and know the business takes a toll on family life. It's not a life for everyone- you really have to love it. How did you find your love of cooking? Is it something you learned at home, from someone who was an excellent cook? Although I'm not a professional cook myself, my brothers and I learned from our mother and grandmother. Only the youngest can't really cook, but our middle brother made it his profession. Two of us find great pleasure spending time creating in our kitchens (well, not so much in the cleaning up....!)

 

We hope you continue to take part in discussions, contribute to the knowledge base and to have some fun here, too. 

Best regards,

Mezzaluna

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post #3 of 6
Greetings from Göteborg. we're probly cooking a lot of fish from the same catch areas. U working at Noma.
post #4 of 6
Welcome! I am new here as well. I learned to cook from my grandmother. She taught me everything from bread and pie making, to beef roasts and lobster bisque. She was originally from Scandinavia but grew up here in the U.S.A. I absolutely love cooking. My weakness, as well as my strength, with cooking is that I can't follow a recipe if my life depended on it! My grandmother always told me that was because she taught me "how" to cook instead of just what to cook. Anyway, nice to meet you on this forum.
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys. My love of cooking came from... Well, I can't really say, it just sort of always was there, me watching my mom cook dinner as a child, I'd be on my stepladder watching and trying not to get burnt and as I got older my responsibilities went up to dicing an onion or whatever, but I always felt this close connection with what was going on in those pots, and I always wanted to know more. I spent plenty of time in fields not related to cookery (working the checkout at the local grocery store ftw), but it always felt like a job and not a calling.

 

Several years later, 2 higher educations tried and skipped (I passed chemistry, physics and math, which I see as useful for food prep, but I ultimately just couldn't handle the strict thinking of these schools), I decided to join "the fray" and go for that chef's hat. I knew it took a bastard, and I knew I had him in me.

 

I got my wheels on this place, "the archer", run by a man who had surely taken in more than he could bite. It was a glorious setting, and reservations were set for years ahead, but someone had decided that this glorious summer retreat needed to be year-round and a'la'carte. That killed the man. I left after a couple of months, on good terms, as this was all too crazy for a beginner, as I was. Looking back, with my current experience, I could've turned that place in months, but I digress.

 

I used my (by then, meagre) contacts within the trade to gain my next contract; a classic, french-inspired steak house with roots going back to the 70s. I learnt my basics here, basics I still rely on. Stuff like caring for a stock, cooking a roux, or a thing that impresses my current students to no end; how determine how much a steak is cooked just by the touch.

 

Also, by year 2 and 3, I learnt the basics of controlling tickets, spewing out more orders than I had ever thought imaginable. Every now and then, more often than not, I miss that place.

 

I got my colours in '08 and got myself a job as a cook by walking in the front step of this restaurant I heard needed help. I was hired without much fuss. We did a lot of fun food, cooking scallops, veal and the like until the financial crisis hit. Fuck her(/him?).

 

The crisis saw us scrambling for customers while still keeping with our high-end profile. Not a win, I'll skip the intermediate stuff as it was all clutching for straws, but we ended up serving foot-high arrangements of shellfish and other things not readily available (and expensive as sh*t) in my area. Oddly enough, the place didn't survive. It was, however, bought by some very, very rich people. The people who started the venture of which I'm currently employed.

 

My story so far. Let me know if you want to know what happened in my trained years.

post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodwitch View Post

Welcome! I am new here as well. I learned to cook from my grandmother. She taught me everything from bread and pie making, to beef roasts and lobster bisque. She was originally from Scandinavia but grew up here in the U.S.A. I absolutely love cooking. My weakness, as well as my strength, with cooking is that I can't follow a recipe if my life depended on it! My grandmother always told me that was because she taught me "how" to cook instead of just what to cook. Anyway, nice to meet you on this forum.

Dude, you've got it. You know "how" instead of "what". Now all you need is "why" and you'll be a pro!

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