or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Another Shun question!

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hey all, I'm new to the forums but have been browsing awhile. Ill introduce myself more in depth in the welcome section, I have a a question on Shuns however.

I know many people don't fancy the Shun however I like the feel of the blade and the way i use it and am in need of a nice santuko for my knife roll. I'm looking at three shuns, the 7in premiere, the 7 in classic, and the one I'm leaning towards and just held at WS today the 7.5 in Classic double Sumo. Have any of you tried the Sumo and if so what are your opinions. I like the look of it with the wide blade however is it practice and what are some of the pros and cons with that knife vs the classic santoku. Thanks for any help or advice you may have!
post #2 of 11
Thread Starter 
Any thoughts? I was going to purchase tomorrow because I'm moving away to the CIA soon.
post #3 of 11

get a tojiro dp or a fujiwara fkm if i were you, or even a richmond artifex and get more knife for your money.

post #4 of 11

Have you checked with CIA about knives?  You may be furnished with/required to use their knives.  In any event I'm not sure it's a great idea to spend a bunch of cash on knives before you get to culinary school.  Unless you've been working in restaurants or done a lot of knife work you probably don't have a great idea of just what you're gonna need.  As you become more experienced you'll probably gravitate to brands you haven't even heard of right now.

 

Shun isn't terrible but it's just middle of the road, and a little overpriced now.  I agree that a Tojiro DP would be a better deal (same steel, cheaper but as good or better).  The Richmond knives are terrific.  I can think of 20 brands I'd rather have than Shun.

 

You probably shouldn't spend a lot on a santoku.  That's a knife made for a Japanese housewife or an American raised on Rachael Ray.  It's not a knife that belongs in a pro kitchen.  A gyuto/chef's knife can do everything a santoku can, but the reverse is not true.  You'd be better off getting a 210mm gyuto and learning to use that.  My weapon of choice for 90% of the tasks I do at work is a 240mm gyuto.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your comments, but let me clear a few things up. It's probably confusing since I haven't fully introduced myself in the forums. I'm currently in culinary school at a local community college. I went in order to get t grades up from a previous year in college so I could get into the CIA. I've staged in some of the best restaurants in Boston including Toro, Coppa, and Clio (all Ken Oringer and Jamie BIssonette places) and have been working in the food service industry since I was a sophomore in Highschool 5 years ago.

I know the CIA supplies a knife kit however I've heard they are not the best and lve the feel of Shuns Santukos and wanted to add one to my collection. I just wasn't sure of the difference in functionality between the regular blade and the sumo.? And I do have some pretty good knife skills and know a decent amount regarding different styles of blades and materials used to forge them. Simply had never heard of a Sumo before.
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
And I figured since the CIA doesn't supply a santuko it would be nice to have one in my knife roll.
post #7 of 11

Ah, I see.  Well, you're probably considerably more advanced than most people in your shoes.  The Shun will probably be a bit too much like "training wheels" to you.  I'm headed out the door to work in a few (I close the restaurant tonite) but I'll toss out a few suggestions when I get back.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #8 of 11

I own the Shun sumo "double hollow ground" santoku which I loved at first use.  Then I bought a Konosuke HH 240mm wa gyuto.

The shun (and a Mac Pro santoku) are among the several hundreds of $$ I never would have spent if I had purchased the Kono first.  

 

I have no problem sharpening the Shun, but it's nowhere near as precise in use as the Kono and I do like to chop veg at a near-recreational level. 

post #9 of 11

Overall I am a big fan of high carbon steel.  It's hard to beat the edge that you can get with Aogami, and edge retention is better than "vanilla" stainless steels like VG-10.  White #1 is also amazing in the edge it will take.  I generally prefer semi-stainless tool steels to most true SS; the Kagayaki CarboNext knives at JCK are a superb example.  They get sharper than a Shun and hold the edge longer.  Some Shun knives use SG-2 which is a step up from VG-10.

 

Konosuke is a hue step up from Shun but recently they initiated a very steep price increase.  I suppose they're still good even at the new price but they're not the screaming bargain they were a year ago. 

 

The Tojiro DP line perhaps marginally better than the Shun but considerably cheaper.

 

I can highly recommend the CarboNext.  A santoku from the CN line at JCK is just over $110 with shipping and much better than a Shun.  JCK has a lot of great stuff, and you might want to look at their "JCK Originals".  All are very good deals.  The Hattori Forum knife made from them by Hattori is pretty much the pinnacle of VG-10 and a wonderful line of knives.  And if you can deal with the maintenence of carbon the Fu-Rin-Ka-Zan is outstanding.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 

So I ended up getting a Shun Classic Nakiri. I figured its something different and I loved the feel and the chopping motion with it. It seems like it will make mise en place a breeze. I also got a set of kyocera ceramics, a 5 in Santoku and a pairing knife. 

post #11 of 11

i would have loved to have a kono, with their old prices. i wouldn't buy one at their current prices personally. just a matter of opinion. =D

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Knife Reviews