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Sharpening dilemna

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Like a lot of people (home cook) coming to this forum, I've gone through expensive process of upgrading sharpening tools as I got more into "better" knives. Had the Chef's Choice Trizor XV for a year and highly recommend it for anyone with Japanese blades who isn't anal-compulsive about gear (easy and gets blades plenty sharp). Then moved on to the Edge Pro Apex with chosera stones, which has been great for everything from a 150 petty to 270 gyuto and sujihiki.

 

But I just hit the Apex wall with my latest blade, a Sugimoto #6 cleaver. First the blade is too wide for the Edge Pro unless I turn the rest 90°. The bigger problem is the angle is no where close to low enough to accomodate this blade. I would have to great a jig that's nearly 10 cm thick for the stone to hit at proper angles. Not even sure the Edge Pro Pro can handle this blade. 

 

Was really hoping to avoid the learning curve of freehand sharpening. But it's looking like that may be my only option short of selling the cleaver, which I like. To compound matters, my wife put a sizable chip in the center of the edge (don't ask). So I have a $300+ blade that I can't sharpen at the moment. Buy stones and learn to freehand? If so, since I'll likely keep the EPA, which? Or upgrade to EPP? Or ditch the EP entirely and just go with stones and live with crappy sharpening until I figure it out? Don't have many cheap practice knives anymore.

 

Just two years ago I was content with German knives and a pull-through sharpener....

post #2 of 10

Well as far as practice knives go,  I just bought 3 made of X50Cwhatever, 8" chefs, 7" santoku, 5" utility, all nicely tapered and pretty hard for and take a nice edge for cheap stamped blades, all for $12 at a local discount outlet.  They're a little gift for a friend who doesn't need any better than these to replace his Ginsus.  So at least practice knives aren't your problems.  ;-)  I'd say sending your chipped cleaver to a pro for repair is the place to start,  BDL and the others will likely chime in soon.

 

Rick

post #3 of 10
Quote:

Originally Posted by Alpncook View Post

 

Was really hoping to avoid the learning curve of freehand sharpening. But it's looking like that may be my only option short of selling the cleaver, which I like. To compound matters, my wife put a sizable chip in the center of the edge (don't ask). So I have a $300+ blade that I can't sharpen at the moment. Buy stones and learn to freehand? If so, since I'll likely keep the EPA, which? Or upgrade to EPP? Or ditch the EP entirely and just go with stones and live with crappy sharpening until I figure it out? Don't have many cheap practice knives anymore.

 

Post a pic of the chip and lets see how bad it is. I is probably best to send that to Jon at Japanese Knife Imports for repair. He has some specialized equipment for really bad damage repairs.

 

A chip in the edge needs to have the whole edge ripped off to where the chip ends and then recreate the edge at that point. It can be reasonable or a major chore but is by no means a simple task.

 

Jim

post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

Okay, here are some photos. The bigger one is about 1mm wide and 0.5mm deep. Even if I do send this to JKI, I'd still like to be able to maintain the blade, which seems to be beyond the Apex capabilities without making some fancy jig.

 

 

700

 

700

 

700

post #5 of 10

won't take too long, maybe 45 mins to an hour to finish that work. you'll need a really coarse stone for that, at least a 150 grit one and practically vertically grinding off the whole thing and then you'll need to reset the bevel, so the 150 til you've pretty much done the bevel around halfway then a 500 to take off the scratch patterns then a 1000 one to make it nice and sharp. beyond that you can just experiment with whatever grit levels thereafter.

 

 

check out this vid

 

 

should get you started and have an idea how.

post #6 of 10
You may consider as well the use of sandpaper in the P120-320 grit range instead of a coarse stone.
post #7 of 10
Contact Ben at Edgepro for advice. If there's a work around , he'll explain it as well as anybody. In the overall scheme of things, fixing chips isn't really that big a deal. Just a little time consuming maybe. Remove just enough metal and create a new bevel
post #8 of 10

Not as bad as some but the edge has to be ripped down below the damage and recreated.

 

You have to examine the existing geometry and replicate it. Some cleavers are similar to single bevel knives in that there is a flat section, a very acute angle, and the more obtuse edge angle. I can't tell for sure but yours may be similar.

 

Rip the edge down, bring the shinogi line back the same distance, and recreate the edge. I had one cleaver come in that had about 1/8" in damaged edge and the very acute angle was an 8 degree. The longest part is grinding the blade path to bring the shinogi line back enough.

 

As was said contact Edge Pro and see if he has a cleaver jig or suggestion.

 

Jim

post #9 of 10

Just for the heck of it, does the chipped cleaver cause any problems in actual use?  If not, why bother to grind away so much?  Enough sharpenings, especially of a carefree sort of aggressive nature,  will eventually produce the same fix. 

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by KnifeSavers View Post

Not as bad as some but the edge has to be ripped down below the damage and recreated.

 

You have to examine the existing geometry and replicate it. . .

 

Jim

I watched the vid Franz posted, and one interesting thing (after getting over seeing and HEARING him drag the edge straight across that very rough stone), he was actually reprofiling to remove some of the belly on the cleaver (a Shun, I think).  So, you might have the option to make changes if desired--whether regarding the belly or chiseling on one or both sides.  A chance for a fresh start. 

 

(I've never used an EP, so have nothing to contribute there, but I'm certainly interested in hearing how you progress with this project.  Good luck, and please keep us posted!)

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