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Smooth out Temperature Rollercoaster On Electric Stove

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Well, maybe it's not quite as bad as rollercoaster but the temperature on my electric stove does indeed cycle on and off and on and off, which results in a slight drop and then increase in the temperature of the contents in the pot.  I have measured variations where the swing is from 170F to 178F during the on/off cycles that happen with most (if not all) electric stoves.

 

Descriptions of heat diffusers seem to only say that they spread out the heat more evenly to prevent hot spots on the bottom of the pot.  But hot spots aren't my problem.

 

Do you know of a material that is resistant to temperature change such that it holds on to heat and maintains it's hot temperature even during the off portion of the stove's cycle?  I'd be happy if I can keep the temparature swing within a range of only two degrees like from 172F to 174F.  What material can i put on top of my stove that won't cool off so fast during the off portion of the stove's cycle?

 

kind thanks,

Eddie

post #2 of 6

Cast iron, would be the recommended choice for your situation. But you'll still get the cycle swings anyway. It's little different from a mass based heat diffuser really.

 

This is just how cheap electric stoves work, tending to cycle the heat at near full power to off to "average" out the intensity in the pan. Unless you're renting, you should probably upgrade your stove to get what you want.

 

An 8 degree swing in the pan, isn't worth worrying about generally speaking unless you're making candy, and at the temps you mention, that's not candy.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

I was using those numbers as an example only.  It actually gets worst when the temperature is higher and it can swing up to 10F.

 

Will a Pizza stone between the electric coil and the pot be better than Cast Iron.  In other words, if both were at the same exact hot temperature and both were simultaneously taken off the hot coil, which would cool down faster...say from 250F to 230F (Stone or Cast Iron)?

 

kind thanks,

Eddie

 

P.S. thanks for your previous response phatch, I appreciate the help

post #4 of 6

Pizza stone wouldn't take the thermal shock and uneven heating well.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 6

My first question concerns the cycling: is it temperature driven or is it time driven?

 

If time driven, i.e. the burner cycles on-off in a consistent time sequence, say, on 30 seconds, off 10 seconds, then a thermal reservoir (cast iron, etc.) will help.

 

If temperature driven, there's  not much help available mechanically, only to change the regulator or thermal sensing system.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #6 of 6

No time to explain...

...do this.

 

 

Measure the inside racks of your oven.

 

Determine what the largest size of steel you could put down and still maintain 2" of clearance on all sides.

 

Go to your local steel  shop and get them to cut you one piece of W44 this size 3/8" thick if you are strong.... 3/4" thick if you are insane.

 

Put the bottom rack on the lowest position.

 

Put this 'huge' hunk of metal on that rack.... don't worry about moving it ever again.

 

This is the ultimate thermal mass.

It will also diffuse and disperse the heat from the bottom element much better than anything else.

 

It also has many other uses, think oven spring, steam and bottom crisping.

 

I'll try to elaborate tomorrow but we'll see what the beast of the restaurant requires first.!

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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