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Is this enough to get started in fine dinning?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Hi I graduated culinary school a year ago I drove three hours a day for two years to attend. I'm from a town of 20,000 my school is in a town of a million with nice resturants would love to relocate to gain more experiance I've only worked in steakhouses,diners,and a bistro haven't sent any resumes out yet do you think any chefs would be willing to give me a chance i'be worked saute stations, grille, cold , station,and omlete stations dwould realnyly like to Excel in fine sinning any sugestiongs?
post #2 of 8

You won't get anywhere unless you apply for the jobs. If you can do the following, you should be fine.

1.Show up on time. 

2.Do the work the way the chef tells you to do it. 

3. Make sure your mise-en-place is prepped and ready. 

4. Work neat, clean and organized. 

5 Handle the pressure when the restaurant gets busy. 

6. Not act like a prima donna but a team player. 

7. Learn new things on a regular basis. 

Others here will have further suggestions but that's a start. 

Work in a kitchen, whether it's diner, steakhouse or fine dining involves all of the above. Start typing your resume.

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thanks just anxious to learn all I can and work hard
post #4 of 8

Kitchens and restaurants always have high turn-over rates when it comes to employees, especially in the kitchen itself.  So a smart and fair chef would look for a few good aspects out of a potential employee, instead of being overly picky.  I would completely agree with @ChefWriter's post, but I would add a few things to think about for first impressions (as in an interview).  That you are confident, comfortable and familiar in the kitchen. Also, that you are more than willing to learn new things as well as re-learning anything you know already to the standards of your new Chef.  The best thing you can do is dive right in.

post #5 of 8

you might find it hard to gain/keep a job in the 2-3 michelin places. So perhaps something that bridges the gap and gives you some experiance in a decent 1 star or equivilent place would give you that stepping stone you need.

post #6 of 8

I'm not saying this to be snarky or anything but you have to make sure that your grammar and spelling is a LOT better than what you typed above. Punctuation, editing typos, etc. are all your friend, especially on a resume and cover letter. Get someone you trust to look it over--parents, chef instructor, etc. 

 

Does your culinary school have career placement services? A job board? Do any of the chefs know any chefs in the city that need help? 

 

Try doing stages. Stages are basically unpaid labor, you go to a place for a set amount of time (a day, a week, a month, whatever) and work for free in exchange for, well, knowledge and experience. This is usually only recommended if you can do it financially (that is, work for free), but it might get your foot in the door and lead to a job if you are any good. 

 

My advice is to start pounding the pavement. Make a list of the, say, 5 best places in your city and apply at all of them. Be persistent...chefs are notoriously hard to get a hold of. Go earlier in the morning, before lunch service, or in the afternoon, after lunch service. Please don't ever call in the middle of service. Not only will the chef not be able to take your call, he/she will think you know nothing about the business. If you can't get into any of those 5 places, then go to the next best 5 places, and keep going until you land a gig. Like Patrick Spriggs said, you can use your first job as stepping stone. Once you have one good to great restaurant on your resume, a lot more chefs are likely to notice you. But, for the love of god, stay at your job at least a year. At least. It doesn't look good to constantly change jobs every 6 months. 

 

Be prepared to start at the bottom. Are you willing to be a prep cook? Dishwasher? How bad do you want it? If you are lucky you can skip the prep cook job and move to the cold station...

 

You will likely be asked to trail, or, that is, work for a shift in the kitchen so you can check each other out. That is a separate topic (try the search button) but just be ready for it...it is extremely common. 

post #7 of 8

Practise man. Buy some cook books, read some articles on fine dining, learn cuts, etc. Then apply for a fine dining restaurant, make it clear that you don't have fine dining experience, but it is something you want to learn.

I've never been through any kind of formal training, and I landed a job in a fine dining restaurant, serving people who pay up to $60 for a single dish, after about a week of just mise en place and dishes when he trusted me to make even simple salads. Everything takes time, and no chef should expect you to be some superstar in the kitchen with no fine training.

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post

I'm not saying this to be snarky or anything but you have to make sure that your grammar and spelling is a LOT better than what you typed above. Punctuation, editing typos, etc. are all your friend, especially on a resume and cover letter. Get someone you trust to look it over--parents, chef instructor, etc. 

 

This sentiment is totally spot on and I couldn't agree more. When interviewing potential new employees, I am not looking for English majors. However a person's grammar, punctuation, and especially their spelling; give a good insight into their attention to detail. If a person can't be bothered with making sure that their spelling is correct, then they probably won't be overly concerned with making sure that their plating (for example) is correct either.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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