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Cooking Low Carb

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I have been trying to stay away from all the major carbohydrates lately, such as all the whites, I.e. potatoes, rice, pasta, sugar, flour and ALL BREADS. In addition I have been avoiding corn and carrots and sweet potatoes and yams. For meats, I am only doing red meat once a week and avoiding pork and lamb all together. Pretty much sticking with chicken and fish and seafood.

So here it is, I am running out of ways to prepare a dish that is exciting and flavorful yet limited in so many ways. For instance, vegetables have me stumped. I am tired of medleys and stir frys. Does anyone have some really good vegetable recipies to share that are different from simply stir frying the veggie?
post #2 of 17

How about some cajun flavors like Chicken Creole (tomatoes, onion, bell pepper, garlic, celery, red pepper flakes stewed together) or Catfish Courtbouillon, stewed okra-tomatoes-garlic-onion and add shrimp at the last minute, turkey and sausage gumbo, seafood gumbo, smoked turkey in greens.. Most of the carbs from cajun food come from eating it over rice.

post #3 of 17

boiled

steamed

sauteed

simmered

stewed

sous-vide

cevice

pickled

soured

brined

fermented

roasted

raw

and finally freeze dried!

 

 

14 different ways... should hold you over for 2 weeks of meals

 

 

biggrin.gif

 

(it's not about the preparation of the veggies it's about the whole meal)


Edited by MichaelGA - 1/7/13 at 6:41am

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #4 of 17

Hi, I've been low-carbing for a few months and I find a huge benefit in how we all feel and function.  I could never do no-carbs though, that just makes me and everyone around me fear my mood.  I've got a husband and a toddler so I do have to offer them some healthy carbs, the key is to not indulge too much.

 

I find eggs to be my best friend.  I eat them daily fried, poached, hard boiled, omelettes, fritattas loaded with veggies and scrambled.  One of my favorite snacks is a hard boiled egg wrapped in ham. 

 

Try roasting some vegetables.  I love a good roasted carrot.  Par boil your carrots then toss them in a roasting pan with a little olive oil, cumin, coriander and red pepper flakes.  Roast until they get a little color.  And why are you avoiding carrots?  Carrots are not donuts!  They provide a slew of important nutrients.

 

Here's a recipe for pizza made with a cauliflower crust http://www.eatingbirdfood.com/2012/09/healthy-pizza-with-a-cauliflower-crust/

 

And please don't forget that potatoes, carrots, corn and sweet potatoes are indeed vegetables, they are not full of sugar or gluten and while it's smart to limit them I don't see how anyone can sustain themselves forever without them in their diet.  Low carb is a smart way of living healthy, no carb is a fad diet.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 17

I find it very interesting that, almost universally, nutritional advice revolves around 40-30-30; protein, carbohydrate, fat, and emphasizes portion control, i.e. calories in offsets calories out, otherwise weight gain.

 

For me, low carb, low fat, high carb, whatever, may have short term desirable effects but have undesirable side effects in the long term.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #6 of 17

Carbs in and of themselves are not evil. The bad juju attached to carbs stems mainly from simple carbs which have little nutritional value. Complex carbs on the other hand are benefical and necessary to the human body. Examples of complex carbs abound even in the vegetable world, such as spinach, broccoli, beans, zucchini, and lentils.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

I find it very interesting that, almost universally, nutritional advice revolves around 40-30-30; protein, carbohydrate, fat, and emphasizes portion control, i.e. calories in offsets calories out, otherwise weight gain.

 

For me, low carb, low fat, high carb, whatever, may have short term desirable effects but have undesirable side effects in the long term.

 

Portion control is key.  However, I do find that I feel better, more energetic and my mind is sharper when I keep a check on carbohydrates.  Like I said before, low-carb is sensible because your body absolutely needs the glucose but in excess it can cause me to feel sluggish, overweight and craving more carbs.  If only it was as simple as calories in calories out as you say then the problem would be solved.  But a calorie is not just a calorie.  I can eat 200 calories of veggies and hummus and feel fantastic versus eating 200 calories in cookies.  The latter causes me to crave more and more and more which can start a frightening cycle and a path to more cookies followed by cheesecake followed by potato chips and a big spag bol.

 

At the end of the day those who naturally exercise portion control do not have an issue with this.  But for carboholics the addiction is cruel and scary.  Carbs are very addictive, especially processed refined carbs like white bread and sugar.  This documentary was life changing for me, it's called Sugar: The Bitter Truth: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0z5X0i92OZQ

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

 

At the end of the day those who naturally exercise portion control do not have an issue with this.  But for carboholics the addiction is cruel and scary.  Carbs are very addictive, especially processed refined carbs like white bread and sugar.  This documentary was life changing for me, it's called Sugar: The Bitter Truth: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0z5X0i92OZQ

 

Koukouvagia, I LOVE this video. It's a test for one's attention span because it's so long but for those who haven't seen it, the video explains down to the molecular level the differences in how various sugars and high-fructose corn syrup affect our bodies.

post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurenlulu View Post

 

Koukouvagia, I LOVE this video. It's a test for one's attention span because it's so long but for those who haven't seen it, the video explains down to the molecular level the differences in how various sugars and high-fructose corn syrup affect our bodies.

 

Lol, you make the video sound kind of boring when in fact it was life changing.  LIFE CHANGING and quite possibly the most important bit of information I have ever learned about food.  Sugar is evil, that's not just an opinion - it is now a scientific fact.  In our society nowadays sugar is everywhere when nature has made it nearly impossible to obtain pure sugar (think how hard it is to collect honey, or to process sugar cane???)  it has now suddenly and dramatically ended up in hamburger buns amongst everything else.

 

Life changing.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 17

HAHA! To me that's the interesting part! I love biology and chemistry, it's part of why I am so comfortable baking and cooking with no recipes. Chemical (leavening ratios) and biological (sensual reponses) knowlege are key to making great food. Purtiness sends it over the top :)

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
Well we try to eat what we consider a healthy lifestyle. We don't tell ourselves we "can't" have something, rather we choose to eat what we want- and if they happen to be not so good for us, I.e. cookies, well then we understand the consequences. Having said that, when originating this discussion, I did not ask what everyone else thought of as healthy or not, just what I was avoiding from my diet. That question was did anyone have any suggestions for some more interesting and versatile side dishes involving vegetables other than the typical carrots, peas, cauliflower, broccoli, beans, carrots, and celery. Then I mentioned what we stay away from. See the first post. Oh, and I too, have seen the movie "the bitter truth" about sugar. I am we'll aware as I am of many other things people put in their bodies on a daily basis which is poison for them. But I won't preach, this isn't the place for that. Lets cook! Where are those terrific recipies!
post #12 of 17
A vegetable gratin.
A vegetarian cottage pie.
A vegetable curry.
Salsa with Tortilla bread.
Ratatouille
Meditterean vegetable cous cous
Vegetarian terrine
Nasi goreng
Chinese vegetarian fried rice or noodles.
Vegetarian Congee
Vegetable tempura
Vegetable panko

Search the internet for these recipes and others. Google it if you have to.
post #13 of 17
You mention sugar. What do you do if you are diabetic type 2?
post #14 of 17

Almost every case of type 2DM is caused by weigh issues.

A balanced diet combined with a habitual, daily exercise regimen will in most cases "cure you".

Yes, you can still have the occasional cocktail and dessert (abstinence is the deal breaker in most weight loss attempts).

It is the mindless eating while watching tv (reading, driving...you get the picture) that exacerbates any underlying problem (usually genetic).

I know it is hard to resist, but instead of grabbing that bag of chips or cookies and plopping down in front of the TV go walk the dog.

 

mimi

post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodwitch View Post

Well we try to eat what we consider a healthy lifestyle. We don't tell ourselves we "can't" have something, rather we choose to eat what we want- and if they happen to be not so good for us, I.e. cookies, well then we understand the consequences. Having said that, when originating this discussion, I did not ask what everyone else thought of as healthy or not, just what I was avoiding from my diet. That question was did anyone have any suggestions for some more interesting and versatile side dishes involving vegetables other than the typical carrots, peas, cauliflower, broccoli, beans, carrots, and celery. Then I mentioned what we stay away from. See the first post. Oh, and I too, have seen the movie "the bitter truth" about sugar. I am we'll aware as I am of many other things people put in their bodies on a daily basis which is poison for them. But I won't preach, this isn't the place for that. Lets cook! Where are those terrific recipies!

 

You must bare with us, we get questions about nutritionally driven recipes a lot around here and they always go down the route of arguing and protesting against a person's choices.  I really don't mean to preach but the carb issue is the dominant issue in my own personal life right now.  I've always been a foodie but I'm learning to cook for my health as well as my enjoyment and I've been in the no carb camp a few times... quite unsuccessfully.  Most people here are not willing to entertain the thought of dieting of any sort so I jump at the chance to talk healthy food vs. yummy food.  Some people can be Giada di Laurentis and eat pasta every day while maintaining a size 2 and there are the rest of us who by merely glancing at a slice of toast we gain weight lol.  Anyway, I'm not trying to preach I'm just pointing out that carrots and yams are vegetables too :( but I totally understand the need to back away from all carbs all together for a while.

 

Are you eating any legumes?  I find they are a good source of protein and toss them in many soups and salads.  I particularly like lentils, navy beans, black beans and kidney beans.  They do add a carb punch so I limit them.  Eggs like I said are a staple, you can load them with veggies.  Some people like to make pasta out of squash but I don't love it.  I love a zucchini, boiled whole and drizzled with olive oil and sea salt.  The texture is very buttery and I eat it with a fork and knife - it makes it more substantial.  Also a staple at our house is boiled greens, dandelions in particular now in the winter time.  You can also do this with chard or spinach.  Wash very well and then boil until tender.  Serve dressed with olive oil and lemon juice as a salad.  Don't throw out the liquid they were boiled in, it makes a great tea.  For a fun dinner make tacos with chicken or fish, and lots of veggies.  Instead of taco shells roll them up in butter lettuce.  I also love tuna salad served on endive leaves.  For a fancy dinner grill large portabellos, stuff them with real crab meat and bake until golden.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #16 of 17

I sometimes like to think about a meal as a set of dishes that complement each other rather than a main dish with sides. Some cuisines are better suited to this approach than others though. For instance I love imam bayildi (small aubergines stuffed with tomatoes, onion and garlic baked in olive oil - sounds simple, but if everything is right, it's fabulous), some meat and vegetable stew, a salad and freshly baked pita bread is all you need, really. I don't cook low-carb, but I do try to avoid those simple carbs, too. Indian cuisine has some nice dense flatbreads with low content of wheat flour, but using chickpea flour or lentil flour. Then stuffed tomatoes - a bit of old bread, crumbled, olive oil, lots of garlic, parsley or basil - a good side for grilled lamb or chicken. At the end of the day, the best thing would probably be to get inspiration from traditional cuisines like French, Italian, Greek, Turkish, Lebanese etc.

post #17 of 17

A bag of pork skins is your friend.smile.gif

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