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Degree or Work Experience? - Page 2

post #31 of 38

If you choose a community college program, really investigate before you commit.

 

Two of the worst cooks (and one became an Exec) came out of our local CC. They couldn't cook worth a crap and from what I could see didn't learn anything that was useful other than boning chicken. They could bone the hell outta some chicken because that's all that the program could afford, there isn't the revenue that a larger school would have so they must teach with the basic ingredients. Knife skills weren't so hot either.

 

I found myself "teaching" them every day even my superior, like why gelatin won't set if fresh pineapple is used in it.  

 

Maybe the CCs in your area are better but around here I'm wary of the numbnuts they churn out.

post #32 of 38
Thread Starter 
In short, working first then decide on studying when work stablizes will be better.
post #33 of 38
Quote:
In short, working first then decide on studying when work stablizes will be better.

Conversely, wouldn't applying knowledge learned yield more "experience".  

 

Let's get away from egg cooking.  Do you know how to cook risotto?  No matter where you work, if you know how to make risotto, you can cook any risotto put in front of you regardless of the "this is how we do it" recipe.  Unless you are specializing in one area, be it short order or sushi, education on methodology will make you stronger.  Recipes change from place to place, but knowing the right methodology will open doors to any kitchen

post #34 of 38

Of course, that assumes that the school teaches how to cook risottocrazy.gif

 

There are far too many variables to answer the question with any degree of precision.

 

If you know the school teaches the culinary techniques that you will use in the future and the work experience does not, the answer is clear.

 

If the school teaches recipes and you know the work experience gives you the opportunity to learn culinary techniques, the answer is opposite.

 

If it is a question deciding between a competent school and work experience under competent and experienced culinarians, it is a toss-up.

 

If you learn the easiest by studying and working through fundamentals in a structured environment, the edge goes to the school.

 

If you have astute observation, are quick on the uptake, and enjoy frantic pressure, the work experience may lead the way.

 

There is no magic answer that fits everyone.
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

Of course, that assumes that the school teaches how to cook risottocrazy.gif

 

There are far too many variables to answer the question with any degree of precision.

 

If you know the school teaches the culinary techniques that you will use in the future and the work experience does not, the answer is clear.

 

If the school teaches recipes and you know the work experience gives you the opportunity to learn culinary techniques, the answer is opposite.

 

If it is a question deciding between a competent school and work experience under competent and experienced culinarians, it is a toss-up.

 

If you learn the easiest by studying and working through fundamentals in a structured environment, the edge goes to the school.

 

If you have astute observation, are quick on the uptake, and enjoy frantic pressure, the work experience may lead the way.

 

There is no magic answer that fits everyone.
 

 

Very well put.

 

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To the OP:

Sometimes the hardest thing in your life is deciding what you want to do with it.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #36 of 38
Thread Starter 
Nicely said. But I've decided to get work experience first then studying cos I don't have much work experiences yet..
post #37 of 38

That decision will prepare you better for, and during culinary school, believe it or not.  Is Shatec still around in S'pore?

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #38 of 38
Thread Starter 
It's still around. I graduated from there. Am in the industry working already. Just got a thought whether should I continue on for a degree or just to work my way up? But now I think I may have my answer already.
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