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What the heck is this caviar looking food?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

1000

 

The only thing I could find that even looks similar are tree frog eggs. However after looking up information on those, I can't find anyone who sells them or uses them. It looks too natural to be gastronomic in my opinion. Any ideas?

post #2 of 27

Could they be simply pea puree with tapioca pearls or a more congealed ball of puree rolled in cooked pearls and then flattened slightly?

post #3 of 27

looks like undercooked tapioca to me.

post #4 of 27

Where'd you get the pic? That could be a clue for us too.

post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meezenplaz View Post

Where'd you get the pic? That could be a clue for us too.

 

From a chef on Facebook. He doesn't tell people what's in his pictures and nobody in the comments knows either lol

post #6 of 27

You let that facebook chef know that people will make up stuff if they don't know.  I could very well take this picture and redit it and say it's tree frog eggs.

post #7 of 27

Tapioca. The white center does not mean it's uncooked.

 

A couple of dishes I made:

 

dcarch

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post

Tapioca. The white center does not mean it's uncooked.

 

A couple of dishes I made:

 

dcarch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What are those greens in the last two pictures ?

post #9 of 27

chive flowers.

post #10 of 27

never cooked it like that. i've always done it so only a small amount of white is visible. is it slightly crunchy?

post #11 of 27

Shazbot.. I really really thought they were Sargassum sp. berries.

post #12 of 27
Israeli couscous?

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #13 of 27

escargot eggs

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #14 of 27

Whatever...it is creepy looking and not something I would even want on my dish much less try to eat.

Gag,

Reminds me of my prom date Senior year and in dire need of a good skin care regimen.

 

mimi

post #15 of 27

You should be willing to try anything once! Otherwise you're only limiting yourself. 

Looks like snail roe, agreed.

post #16 of 27
Thanks cheflayne .....snail eggs of course! I should have known that Israeli couscous was too pedestrian given the 'seriousness' of the photo. I recently read how snail caviar is the new culinary darling, and at $100 an ounce, it's a steal!! I can only hope that between using snail secretion in expensive skin care products and their eggs as the new caviar, the snail population won't dwindle so low so as to never enjoy them again with lots of butter, garlic, and bread!!!!!! redface.gif

Joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #17 of 27

My first glance reaction was a sea urchin shell upside

2837112841_635aa0f8d1_q.jpg

I used to see them all the time when I lived in the BVI.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #18 of 27
Yeah, me too....did you ever eat one? I've stepped on a lot of the black spiny ones, but ever had the nerve or expertise to open one up to eat.......they were all the rage though.....as an aside, we use to pull 'poor man's' escargot (whelks) off the rocks in west end at low tide and have a feast!!!!!!!

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #19 of 27

check out cavi-art.com

post #20 of 27

it isn't caviar. if you look closely theres a small ring around the white center. snail caviar as far as im aware is completely clear.

 

it's almost certainly tapioca, i do want to try cooking it like in the photo above, i would have thought it would be chewy still.

post #21 of 27

I eat first with my eyes and am quite adventurous.

Still looks creepy and I still pass.

However, what is the long (half?) shell thingee in the second set of pix (and is that the protein from said shell or a veg? of some kind (white asparagus, shallot?).

THAT is something I could get my grub on with.

Chive flowers...so delicate and springtimish.

(yes I am aware that I invent words as I go along, part of my charm, don't 'cha know ;-)

 

mimi

post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

 

However, what is the long (half?) shell thingee in the second set of pix (and is that the protein from said shell or a veg? of some kind (white asparagus, shallot?).

 

 

Razor clams I think

post #23 of 27

That's it!

I knew it was a shellfish of some sort, but the name escaped me.

Thx twyst.

 

mimi

post #24 of 27

Still more creepy tapioca

 

dcarch lol.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 

Tapioca it is! I searched tapioca pearls and the first time I didn't see any images that looked like that. After going back and changing my wording in the search similar results show up. Dcarch, how do you cook yours to achieve a white center? I've actually never worked with the stuff before, but know about its existence.

post #26 of 27
Can tapioca pearls be eaten raw? Wouldn't that be like eating raw rice ? I would not sacrifice great flavor for looks. Just me.
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cookers View Post

Tapioca it is! I searched tapioca pearls and the first time I didn't see any images that looked like that. After going back and changing my wording in the search similar results show up. Dcarch, how do you cook yours to achieve a white center? I've actually never worked with the stuff before, but know about its existence.

 

There are generally small pearls (larger than a grain of rice) and large pearls (1/4" balls). The pictures show the large size pearls.

 

The key is to first soak over night, using boiling water. The next day cook in whatever your recipe is, sweet or savory. I don't think you can eat tapioca raw. As I remember, may not be good for health.

 

The white center does not mean it's not cooked.

 

Fun and delicious to eat.

 

dcarch

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