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Choosing a Culinary School on the East Coast

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
Hi, Im currently a business student at my community college, and working in a bar/ restaurant, and after i finish my business degree i plan on going to culinary school somewhere in the east.
My plan is to receive a business degree because when you see many restaurants fail it seems to me its because of mismanaged money problems.

I have started looking at culinary schools though, and i could really use some help from people who have been there and done that kinda thing, it just seems overwhelming to me with all the different schools, how to a determine which school really have the best teachers and best programs, but at the same time not throwing my self in K's of debt.

Any reviews of advise in going through this process would be greatly appreciated, along with recommendations of schools in the Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, D.C. area
post #2 of 3

First, you should visit some of the schools. Pick out a couple that appear to offer what you are looking for and pay them a visit. Or wait until you can move to the east coast, then visit. 

Figure out what you want from the school. You could approach this in a number of ways. Take a course at a time focusing on those things you really want to learn. You can work part time to alleviate some of the costs. Do not take out loans for living expenses. Get a job with the school doing anything if they have a free schooling offer for employees. 

As you stated, no two schools are alike. As a an example, CIA is a self contained campus, not really near any city pleasures so you would definitely need a car. Johnson and Wales is all over Providence and has a bus system of their own as well as the city bus system so classes, cafes, shops, etc are easy to get to without a car. 

Other schools will offer other benefits and drawbacks. Before spending any money, invest in a couple of visits. 

post #3 of 3
Honestly, you'll learn the same At most culinary schools. They're all expensive and overpriced. It's just going to come down to what you take away from it. This isn't an easy business. You have to have a passion to last. But if its what Hu want to do, I'd look into a trade school. Save money.
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