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Fruit Extracts

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I'm looking to start making my own extracts. I've done the basic vanilla, coconut, mint, citrus peel, etc. My question is-- can i use fresh fruit to make an effective extract?  I've done some research on it, but I get such different accounts of it as to puzzle me exceedingly. Also, if anyone wants to give a technical clarification between an extract and a liqueur, I would appreciate it.  Particularly, I'm looking to make mango, pomegranate, blackberry, and raspberry extract. I don't want the mango to go bitter; that has been a frequent problem. 

 

I'm also doing kiwi concentrate with a puree and simple syrup combination; any opinions about the most ideal way to preserve the concentrate (without it going brown or losing flavor) would be helpful. 

post #2 of 9
I like the idea, but I will leave it to the experts to make. McCormick knows what they are doing.
post #3 of 9

A maceration is what you get when you soak or steep flavours (ie citrus peel, spices, etc) in alcohol

 

A liqueur is about 20-25% alcohol, up to 30% sugar, and flavouring and colouring.

 

An eau de vie is a fruit brandy.  Fruit (apples, cherries, plums, pears, etc) are made into a wine which is then distilled.  Calvados, Kirsch, Williams, etc. are all eau die vies.

 

Some delicate fruits like strawberries or raspberries are macerated in 100% alcohol, which, after a while, "waters down" the booze to maybe 30%, it is then distilled to back up to 40-50% alcohol.

 

Most of the citrus fruits and spices have their flavour in volatile oils.  This is isolated by distillation.  Peppermint oil, lemon oil, cinnamon oil, etc are all volatile oils by distillation.

 

It's a big world out there with flavourings and extracts.....

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post #4 of 9

Extract as in concentrated flavoring? If yes you're gonna need some pretty heavy duty equipment for making extracts like that. Distillers, centrifuges, and a filter down to the micron level. And these days they are making flavors and aromas completely in the lab "Apple wood smoked bacon" anyone? Yea that bacon was no where near any wood. Whats wrong with a liqueur or eau de vie made with dehydrated fruit?

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks, foodpump. Basically, I've been experimenting with tincture-style extracts--what youhavetaught me are called "macerations." As is probably obvious, i don't have all of my vocabulary straightened out yet. Basically, another way to phrase my question is: were i to make a tincture with vodka and fresh fruit, could i end up with an end product that would be useful to flavor baked goods and candies? Should i use dehydrated fruit instead? Or is the entire endeavor a waste of time and vodka? I know the tincture technique can be used with vanilla beans, fresh coconut, citrus peel, etc. i would just like some new ideas for flavor combinations...using a technique that will result in something more useful then pleasantly flavored booze.
post #6 of 9

Most of the flavouring for candies are artificial or distilled oils, mainly because you cook the sugar higher than 120 C and at that high of a temp, you will kill the flavour of most alcohol based flavourings.

 

Still, it's fun to experiment....

 

For some of my chocolates, I soak bits of dried fruit in the appropriate booze (apples to cavados, etc) and work this into the ganache.  With other varieties of bon-bons I line a ravioli tray with marzipan, and stuff a few grappa marinated raisins in the pocket, cover with marzipan and dip in couverture.

 

Now with baking, forget about booze for a minute.  You  must have made the mistake once by putting an unwrapped onion (or something just as stinky) next to a block of butter--or cheese--or even eggs in the shell, and then find out the butter tastes like onions.

 

This is why most products containing fat are packaged with some kind of an aluminum foil packaging-the foil is a decent barrier to blocking odours.

 

So, fats absorb flavours, and fats carry flavours just as well as booze.

 

I use this to my advantage.

 

When I do fruitcakes, for example, I cream a huge batch of butter with vanilla, spices, booze, and "selected" dried fruit, then package this up in amounts calculated for a 30 qt batch, and refrigerate for a few days.  When I make my cakes the butter is already flavoured, and the cakes develop good flavour right out of the oven.

 

All I can say is, have fun experimenting

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post #7 of 9
Quote:
When I do fruitcakes, for example, I cream a huge batch of butter with vanilla, spices, booze, and "selected" dried fruit, then package this up in amounts calculated for a 30 qt batch, and refrigerate for a few days.  When I make my cakes the butter is already flavoured, and the cakes develop good flavour right out of the oven.
 

 

That is genius!

 

Thanks a ton for sharing.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #8 of 9

But wait, there's more!

 

I didn't tell you about my "massage".

 

What I do with my dried fruit, is to toss it all in the 30 qt along with the  booze and orange juice.  Stick in the dough hook, and let it run for 15-20 minutes.  By that time the fruit has sucked up all the liquid from the "massage" and is plump enough to bake right away.  I usually do the above in one huge batch and then portion off the fruit in batches to fit a recipie sized for a 30 qt bowl.  That way I have my "meez" of butter and fruit so I can do a batch or two per day without all that messing around.  

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post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

But wait, there's more!

 

I didn't tell you about my "massage".

 

What I do with my dried fruit, is to toss it all in the 30 qt along with the  booze and orange juice.  Stick in the dough hook, and let it run for 15-20 minutes.  By that time the fruit has sucked up all the liquid from the "massage" and is plump enough to bake right away.  I usually do the above in one huge batch and then portion off the fruit in batches to fit a recipie sized for a 30 qt bowl.  That way I have my "meez" of butter and fruit so I can do a batch or two per day without all that messing around.  

Nice - I've always done the steep in juice and booze - never thought to throw it all in the mixer.

 

Will be doing that next time!

 

Thanks again!

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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